Posts Tagged ‘concrete

11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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f_flick17653

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17701

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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17700

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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17758

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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17714

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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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470_1FLICK_07

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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17718

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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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12
May
12

Josef Schultz : Photography

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‘Form #16’
120 x 156 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Halle rot-grau #2’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2002
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‘Halle rot-grau #1’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2001
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‘Form #14’
120 x 160 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Rot-blau’
100 x 142 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Blau-rot’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2001
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Josef Schulz is a “photographer” of modern warehouses and factories – trite industrial buildings that nobody would want to consider to be of any major architectural interest. All over the world these buildings are mass-produced, built for all kinds of industrial production processes using identical plans and blueprints. Their exteriors offer no hint whatsoever of the specific purposes for which they are used, their facades vary only in terms of the materials selected – all of them pre-fabricated, such as slabs of concrete, corrugated sheet metal and other cheap building materials. Josef Schulz does not aim at exposing this architecture in any way nor does he want to venture into a critical analysis of its appearance. He simply uses the photographs of the buildings to study the grammar of his trade. Schulz starts by taking traditional photographs of the halls, storage facilities and industrial structures with large sized photographic plates. Using digital image processing, the analogue picture produced is then “cleansed” of the few remaining hints that point to the age, location or environment of the buildings…

All details that might possibly allow conclusions concerning the actual size, users, time or place of the buildings are completely removed. The physical reality of the buildings is changed in such a way that they seem to become virtual blueprints designed to perfection. Schulz focuses on colours and shapes reducing them to simple block-like structures. Particular emphasis is given to symmetries, colour contrasts and the overall structure of the image: they thus become dominant components of the picture. The buildings now resemble toy architecture; and suddenly appear to be benign counterparts of themselves. He uses this type of processing to eliminate the gap between “photographic” and “painted” reality for the benefit of optimizing the picture. He reverses the photographic process by reducing the physical buildings to their design concepts and the photographically “real” picture to its original “virtual” one. Schulz thus opts for an approach that is diametrically opposed to that of producers of digital images – to make the rendering of artificial pictures appear as real as possible. The viewer is somewhat confused: he seems to recognize parts that appear to be authentic without being able to distinguish whether they were truly located before the camera or generated with the tools of digital image processing. By doing so, he distances himself from the “objectivity” of photography and shows that pictures are always the construct of the visual power of imagination of the artist. – [Extract]

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Josef Schultz : Website

Josef Schultz : More Works

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28
Feb
12

Brancolina : ‘Jewish Museum in Berlin’ (Photography)

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Photo impressions of the Jewish museum in Berlin, designed by Daniel Libeskind.

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‘anxiety’
brancolina
2011
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‘agitation’
brancolina
2011
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‘fear’
brancolina
2011
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‘exile’
brancolina
2011
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‘remembrance’
brancolina
2011
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‘untitled feeling’
brancolina
2011
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Nothing is unimportant. There is no place without history, where you can just do what
you want. Every place speaks in a unique way. It needs to communicate a certain way
and to appeal to people. Architecture is an art of communication – not with words, but
with proportions and with an aura. Every building must tell a story. – Daniel Libeskind.

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Brancolina : Website

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17
Nov
11

Mark Valentine : Photography

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gashes

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‘gashes’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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dynamics of a moment

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‘dynamics of a moment’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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‘m1’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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shape paths

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‘shape paths’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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unfathomable

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‘unfathomable’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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pool rising

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‘pool rising’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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Mark Valentine : More Works

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12
Sep
11

Barbara Kasten : Studio Constructs (Photographs)

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“The process of capturing an image through a camera lens requires “an object.” This body of work addresses
the representational value of that object. By photographing a transparent plane, and its shadow, familiar
association with life experience is eliminated. The result is a “concrete photographic” abstract image.”[bk]

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Studio Construct 8
Archival pigment print
43.75 x 53.75 in
2007

Studio Construct 51
Archival pigment print
43.75 x 53.75 in
2008

Studio Construct 78
Archival pigment print
43.75 x 53.75 in
2009

Studio Construct 59
Archival pigment print
43.75 x 53.75 in
2008

Studio Construct 69
Archival pigment print
43.75 x 53.75 in
2008

Studio Construct 127
Archival pigment print
53 15/16 x 43 1/2 in
2011

Studio Construct 125
Archival pigment print
53 15/16 x 43 1/2 in
2011

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The occurrence of light hitting a plane is distinctive from the recording of the same light thru the lens of a camera. A unique vision occurs through the optical prism that can be captured and ultimately printed, yet cannot be seen by the naked eye. As I directed light on various parts of transparent planes and studied it in the back of a view camera, multicolored abrasions activating the surface appeared. The scratches become a color field of drawing over a normally invisible sheet of plastic.

The perception of a ‘thing’, a recordable reality of representation, is basic to the photographic process. In the series “Incidence”, the rendering of light becomes abstract interpretation of surface and form. However, I do not think of the photograph’s construction in terms of abstraction but as an event. Many abstract notions are conjured up as we view this unique recording of materiality. The synthesis of abstract form and our imagination presents a means of seeing the process of lighting. This phenomenon is the subject of my new work and exhibit ‘abstracting…light’. Barbara Kasten

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Barbara Kasten : Website

Almine Rech Gallery

Tony Wight Gallery

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09
Oct
10

Mark Valentine : Photography

mark valentine
“stretched plain”
photograph
2010

mark valentine
“blue streak”
photograph
2010

mark valentine
“off the beaten path”
photograph
2010

mark valentine
“critical mass”
photograph
2010

Mark Valentine : Photography




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