Posts Tagged ‘structures

11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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f_flick17653

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17701

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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17700

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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17758

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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17714

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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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470_1FLICK_07

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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17718

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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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19
Dec
12

Jean Gaumy : “Polaroids” Series (Photography)

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“Taking pictures is like fishing or writing. It’s getting out of the
unknown that which resists and refuses to come to light.” – Jean Gaumy

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PAR62298

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62290

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62289

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“Haute-Normandie”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62288

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62301

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62291

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR74978

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR62292

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1994
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PAR154535

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“Le Havre”
Jean Gaumy
Polaroid
1995
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Photographer Jean Gaumy invites us to discover another facet of his work on ports, which he has come to know very well over time, a set of polaroïds with poetic views of industrial zones of ‘Le Havre’ docks.

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Jean Gaumy : Magnum Photos

Jean Gaumy : Full “Polaroids” Series

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27
Nov
12

Cathrin Schulz : “Poolside” Series (Photography)

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POOLSIDE is a series which is part of a long-term project called AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA documenting my vision of America as a German Photographer. Immersing myself in the urban scenery of the United States I perceive its authenticity and diverseness’ and embrace it in soul places. With POOLSIDE I sense a piece of Atlanta’s soul, discovering a part of its culture. The series’ subject matter is a community pool. A location of diverse social environments. It was a collective, public experience to capture it. The energy of the pools, a flat continuation of water obscuring what’s below the surface, was a distinctive emotional atmosphere, sensed intuitively: solitary, still and private. [artist statement]

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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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AUTHENTI©ITY of AMERICA
‘POOLSIDE’ Series
waterolor print
2011
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I spend a lot of time finding the perfect place, the purest energy. I return several times to capture an unusual situation – without staging a setting. The images are captured with one and the same camera, no filter, usually short exposure times, same lens. Through the formal reduction and accentuation of particular colors in my photographs, and by using a reduced visual language, careful choice of motifs and precise cropping of the image, I condense singular moments in their own authenticity. The clarity is intensified further through digital manipulation. By heightening contrasts, colors and saturations, I allow individual details and structures that would otherwise escape our attention to emerge in palpable relief. The black background provides a blank canvas, and isolates the subject from time and distance. The aesthetic qualities of my subject matter are placed in the foreground. ~ [ Cathrin Schulz : Process ]

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Cathrin Schulz : Website

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22
Nov
12

Mattia Mognetti : “Istigkeit” Series (Digital Constructions)

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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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“In 2010 I began to ride my congenital attraction for architecture: its huge volumes and gigantism, its shapes and textures… Fascinated by perspective I was taking photographs without fully understanding what my attention was being attracted too, what I was trying to represent with a shot and subsequent post-production. Photography was an opportunity to take a fragment of reality and give it a meaning, but also, conversely, as an expedient to let a significance take possession of reality to bring out himself. The contrast between these two visions became the source of my own reflections. Slowly I realized that psychology was an integral part of my creative experience. That I was not trying to represent architecture, but to use a photograph as way to strike and confuse my perceptive system. Therefore I started producing the first works that were later to be structured in the “Istigkeit” series…

While creating these images i realized that i was getting ever closer to the idea which was guiding me. Trying to invalidate the perceptual and cognitive mechanisms involved in the conceptualization of a given entity by our brains. At first sight each work in the “Istigkeit” series seems different from what it is; and what it is; is not always visible, or at least not clear and obvious. Volumes are artificially combined in the shadows and give rise to solids whose meticulous analysis reveals their illusory value. You follow a surface which then splits. You focus on walls and windows, but these interact and merge into conflicting objects and paradoxical perspectives. The sight is lost in the complexity of textures, intersections and overlays. Nothing is what it is and everything is what it seems. And sometimes, during the perception of what it seems, inside the mental mechanisms that lead to the interpretation of any given scenario, it’s possible your Ego cannot impose itself on a more primitive interpretation, rooted both in individual, collective, cultural and archetypal symbolic components…” ~ Mattia Mognetti

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Mattia Mognetti : Website

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21
Nov
12

Evan Caminiti : “Absteigend” (super 8mm film)

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from Dreamless Sleep : available now for pre-order – Thrill Jockey Label

The first 500 Dreamless Sleep LPs are pressed on maroon vinyl.

Super 8mm film by Paul Clipson – Within Mirrors

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17
Sep
12

Ryuji Miyamoto : “Cardboard Houses” Series (Photography)

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“All I can do is train my eyes and keep watching the world
as it goes on changing, scene after scene, again and again.”

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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Yokohama’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1996
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Osaka’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘London’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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Ryuji Miyamoto’s series of photographs called ‘Cardboard Houses’ depicts the living spaces created by the city’s organized homeless. The project began in the late 1980s but came to full fruition in the mid-1990s, just as Japan suffered from an economic crisis and the homeless population of Tokyo grew rapidly. Miyamoto is mainly known as an architectural photographer which might explain why he concentrated on the structures created by the organized homeless, rather then the homeless themselves. His cardboard houses are a typology of structures reminiscent of the ‘Water Towers’ by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Even his choice of black and white film, plate camera and silver gelatin printing techniques are an homage to the New Objectivity propagated by the Bechers. The view is supposed to be detached, objective, straight, uncompromising and cold. The images are meant to be documents that might inform the viewer on the cardboard chosen for the shacks or where the shacks have been built. Ryuji observed that the houses are predominantly located in the cracks that the megalopolis Tokyo supplies in abundance. While Becher’s water towers are fully exposed to light, space and the lens of the camera, Ryuji’s cardboard houses are usually next to, under or in between structures. [VCB]

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Ryuji Miyamoto : Michael Hoppen Gallery

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