Archive for the 'installation' Category

23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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16
Aug
12

U-Ram Choe : ‘Custos Cavum’ (Sculpture Video)

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Custos Cavum, 2011
size : 220(h) x 360(w) x 260(d)cm
material : metallic material, resin, motor, gear, custom CPU board, LED

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Once upon a time, there were two worlds. Each connected to the other through a number of small holes, as if the worlds were breathing through these holes. However, the holes had a tendency to close up, so there were guardians next to each one to keep them open. The guardians were called “Custos Cavum.” They took the form of seals and had large front teeth, which they used to gnaw the holes to prevent them from closing up. Whenever a Custos Cavum felt the generation of a new hole somewhere, it fell into a deep sleep. From the body of the quietly sleeping Custos Cavum grew winged spores called “Unicuses.” These spores took flight and each flew to a new hole, giving rise to a new Custos Cavum. As time went on, the people of each world forgot about the other. The guardians lost their power and died. When the last Custos Cavum died, the last hole closed, separating the two worlds completely. The existence of the other world was entirely erased from people’s memories. – [X]

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U-Ram Choe : Website

U-Ram Choe : Vimeo

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09
Jul
12

Cristian del Risco : ‘Solamente…’ Series (Artworks)

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In his works Cuban artist Cristian del Risco blends painting, drawing, graphic design and photography.

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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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Cristian del Risco says that he’s always taking new photographs, which he exposes and scans as part of his process, ultimately becoming part of his finished works It’s a lot of mixing and experimentation, he explains. “They are like a combination of graphic design with photography, there are some illustrations, but I tend to combine graphic design with photographs more, I also use old photographs.”

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Cristian del Risco : ‘Solamente…’

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13
May
12

FUTURE SELF : Project Film

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FUTURE SELF studies human movement, mirroring interaction in dance, light and sound, while exploring the self, present and future. Bringing together a media artist collective, rAndom International, a choreographer, Wayne McGregor, and a composer, Max Richter in a unique interdisciplinary clash at MADE. The FUTURE SELF Project Film documents the creative working process, which began in London, England, continued in Berlin, Germany and culminated in three wonderful performances at MADE. Vimeo

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22
Apr
12

Anthony McCall : Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture (Installation)

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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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“Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture”
Installation/Projections
Anthony McCall
2012
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Anthony McCall became known at the beginning of the 1970s for his unique light installations, the so-called solid light films. Hamburger Bahnhof is presenting the largest exhibition of his work to date. A selection of his works from the past ten years will be shown in the historic central hall of the museum. The spacious former railway station with its numerous windows will be transformed for the duration of the exhibition into a cinema space (black box), filled only with haze and veils of light.

McCall has developed a signature technique for his work: animated lines, drawn in white on black, are projected into a room filled with fine haze (originally smoke and dust) so that the two-dimensional drawings are articulated as seemingly tangible, sculptural forms in real space. The artist began this series with the influential film ‘Line Describing a Cone’ and then continued to develop the concept in installations like ‘Long Film for Four Projectors’ (1974).

Originally inspired by the filmic avant-garde, from the very beginning the artist turned cinema on its head, slowed it down, and created a fully traversable, populist space. Thus, his works exist at the borders of cinema, sculpture and drawing. The works are ephemeral, yet they seem tangible and physical. Projected horizontally through the space onto the wall, or – as in his most recent works – from the ceiling to the floor, they engulf the viewer in singular, slow-moving cones of light.

The horizontal works are still reminiscent of the viewing situation in the cinema, where the projector beam is cast lengthwise onto the screen. The vertical projections however, shine light from the ceiling and can be circumnavigated by the viewer, thus moving more fully into the sphere of sculpture. Here too, McCall uses organic, sinuous lines; many works also make direct reference to the body, as illustrated by titles like ‘Between You and I’ and ‘Meeting You Halfway’. Despite his conceptual and formal rigour, McCall always creates an open space where viewers can move around freely, interact with the works, communicate with each other or simply just stroll around. ~ Extract : Exhibition Concept

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Anthony McCall : ‘Five Minutes of Pure Sculpture’

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09
Mar
12

Berndnaut Smilde : ‘Nimbus’ Series (Probe – Exhibition)

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Probe is an exhibition space, with walls no higher then 1,10m and a surface of 6m2. It’s a test lab, an artistic skinner box. Its small and practical dimensions enables artists, to create works on scale, that are unthinkable in real life. The architecture of the space is flexible and wholly subservient to the exhibition: walls can be extended, doors can be removed, a floor made of glass, mirrors or wood, even the lighting situation can be fully controlled. Albeit a physical space, Probe is only accessible on the internet. The registration of the exhibition is the exhibition. Probe’s flexible dimensions proposes questions, as to the nature of space, seeing for example, that Probe can be wholly absorbed by the installation it contains. Exterior or interior, architecture or sculpture become relative notions. Probe can also be used as an exhibition making tool. The height, size and sequence of several works can be researched without having to drill a hole. Sketches used as dummies, scale warps achieved in seconds.

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Berndnaut is fascinated by anything in between… Corridors and clouds, not yet there
and not yet solid. What if a sculpture were to be nothing but thin air, smoke or scent?
We’d discuss the merits of one cloud over the other or would we just shut up in awe.

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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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Interview with Artist

1. How different was it to work in the space of Probe compared to other exhibition spaces?

I usually make a maquette of the space I’m going to work in. A maquette helps me to control and visualize an idea. It provides a clear overview. Probe itself is a model space, and worked for me in the same way: The manner of working is very direct and functional, and being so close to the subject changes the conception of materials and reality. The space is being emphasized. You create an ideal situation and therefore I think the model can stand for an idea. Working in Probe provides an additional point of view to exhibition making and that is an almost god-like position in which you have control over everything. I think it is similar to why people like model-train-landscaping. It’s having total power.

2. What did you want to create in Probe?

I imagined walking into a museum hall with just empty walls. The place even looked deserted. On the one hand I wanted to create an ominous situation. You could see the cloud as a sign of misfortune. You could also read it as an element out of the Dutch landscape paintings in a physical form in a classical museum hall. At the same time I wanted to make (for once) a very clear image, an almost cliché and cartoon like visualisation of having bad luck.

3. What obstacles did you run into?

The idea I had was going to be an ephemeral work. It would only exist as a photo. I thought this would work very well with the idea of Probe, as the exhibitions only exist in the form of documentation. I didn’t realize there is in fact a very physical aspect about Probe’s presentation. The 9 different perspectives of documentation make it possible for the spectator to wander around the space and create the opportunity of visiting the exhibition. Therefore with every shoot we had to make a new cloud and keep in account approximately the same lighting and position to create the illusion of physically walking through the space.

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Berndnaut Smilde : Website

Project Probe

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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