Posts Tagged ‘Landscape

14
Jul
13

Robert Adams :: Photography

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Are there affirmable days or places in our deteriorating world? Are there scenes in life, right now, for which we might conceivably be thankful? Is there a basis for joy or serenity, even if felt only occasionally? Are there grounds now and then for an unironic smile?” ~ Robert Adams

For four decades Adams has photographed the changing landscape of the American West, finding there a fragile beauty that endures despite our troubled relationship with nature, and with ourselves. His photos are distinguished not only by their economy and lucidity, but also by their mixture of grief and hope. [Ext]

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‘Colorado Springs, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘A backyard, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘The New West series’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1979
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‘Eden, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1976-1982
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‘Untitled’
Robert Adams
photograph
1978
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Robert Adams was born in New Jersey in 1937. He was a professor of English literature for several years before turning his full attention to photography in the mid 1970s. His work is largely concerned with moments of regional transition: the suburbanization of Denver, a changing Los Angeles of the 1970s and 1980s, and the clear-cutting in Oregon in the 1990s. His many books, well-known to those concerned with the American Landscape, include The New West, From the Missouri West, Summer Nights, Los Angeles Spring, To Make It Home, Listening to the River, West From the Columbia, What We Bought, Notes for Friends, California, Summer Nights, Walking, What Can We Believe Where? and The Place We Live. [Ext]

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Robert Adams :: The Place We Live

Robert Adams :: Fraenkel Gallery

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11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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10
Jul
13

Henry Wessel :: ‘New Topographics’ (Photography)

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“You’re suddenly seeing the coherence and interconnectedness of everything, left to right, bottom to top, front to back. It’s all connected, and somehow, it’s all in balance. And that’s, when you go ‘Yes!’” H Wessel

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‘Waikiki No. 9’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1979
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‘Incidents No. 16’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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‘Pismo Beach, CA’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1974
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‘Berkeley, California’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1971
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‘Hollywood, California’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1972
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‘New Mexico III’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1969
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‘Tucson, Arizona’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1976
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‘Incidents No. 8’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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‘Incidents No. 6’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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HWE.045_email

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‘New Mexico’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1968
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Henry Wessel first gained recognition in the 1970s as part of the New Topographics, a group of photographers who challenged the conventions of documentary and landscape photography, capturing instead the poetry of seemingly mundane scenes and subjects—traffic lights, advertisements, empty landscapes, and suburbia. During the 1970s he moved to San Francisco from New York after falling in love with the brilliant quality of light in California. There, in both black-and-white and color film, he photographed the vernacular architecture and social landscape of his surroundings, in prints with long shadows and rich tonal variations… [Extract]

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gallery focus21

pace/macgill gallery

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12
Dec
12

Kevin Kemner : “Illustro Divum di Nevada” (Photography)

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Reflecting the spontaneous and temporal quality of the condensation trails, the images are recorded with an iPhone, the camera I almost always have ready at hand. This is in opposition to the larger traditional film formats I prefer for documenting architecture and the built environment. Images have been cropped to a square format. Since the contrails usually happen for a short period around dawn almost every image was shot within sight of my home. K Kemner

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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Kevin Kemner
“Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series
iPhone Photograph
2008 onwards
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Prior to moving to Las Vegas in 1995, the image I had of the southwestern United States was one of an endless landscape of canyons embraced by an equally endless sky of vertical cumuli. Having been raised in the Midwest this was an image formed from afar, largely through the works of iconic figures such as John Ford and Ansel Adams. On arriving here, however, I discovered an entirely other landscape not reflected in the images that I had become familiar with, a landscape of great scale and openness countered by an endlessly vacant sky; the landscape of the Great Basin and Mojave Deserts.

It is the sky of my new home, Nevada that I find most remarkable; often cloudless for weeks the Mojave sky makes one aware of subtleties in the emptiness, observant of things otherwise omitted in the tradition of classic western photography. Such are the condensation trails, threadlike clouds formed by the passage of commercial airliners that appear overhead from late fall to early spring when the air is cold and dry, a linear rather than billowing cloudscape. Having the appearance of being organized, the abstractness of the condensation trails leads one to seek hidden narratives, search for meanings as they are inscribed on and then dissipate in the sky. Introduction – “Illustro Divum di Nevada” Series

This work is part of an ongoing record of the sky above Las Vegas from 2008 to the present.

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Kevin Kemner : More Works

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11
Apr
12

Lola Guerrera : ‘Nebula Humilis’ Series (Photography)

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‘salinera’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘lengua-azul’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘volcan-rojo’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘jale-naranja’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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‘azufre’
‘nebula humilis’
photograph
2011
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Lola Guerrera : Website

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15
Mar
12

Sylvie Bonnot : ‘Eire’ Series (Photography)

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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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‘Untitled’
Inis Mor-Paris
18 x 24 cm
2006-07
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On looking closely at the genesis of Sylvie Bonnot’s work, we begin to realize that the photography is at first, if not a pretext, at least an auxiliary to a walk through a landscape, to pace up and down a territory, to submerge there physically, to merge into it, to embody it. And so, she has crossed alone through the Irish landscape in all weathers, for several years. When she photographs houses and natives there, it seems, in spite of a perceptible empathy, that we do not leave even for a second, the theme of the landscape. When she returns from these periods of immersion, she develops and hoards hundreds of photos, that she sometimes enlarges, even if, for most of the time she amasses them in boxes that she makes for that purpose. Which could be a way for her to appropriate, to contain and to own the territory she has just walked through. [Extract : Text – ‘Eros is a rock’ – Hubert Besacier, 2008]

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Sylvie Bonnot : Website

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