Posts Tagged ‘red

04
Dec
12

William Klein : “Painted Contact Sheets” Series

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“The idea for the colour and graphics comes from the red lines
photographers put around their choices on a contact sheet.” W.K.

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106442

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William Klein_gordas

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William-Klein-Dakar-school’s-out-1985.-Painted-contact-1998-640x537

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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Gun-Gun-Gun-New-York-19551-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807247_8597808736_b-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807969_4d01b3b81a_z

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178409896_ce6bac97ae_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178408408_2a6ef687de_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
24 x 20″
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Klein returned to still photography in the 1980’s, ever progressive and unrelenting in his approach. Revisiting his work to that date, he made large-scale blow-ups of his photographic contact sheets, revealing on an unparalleled scale the frames before and after the decisive image. Liberally applying gloss brush strokes in bold colours to these mural-sized prints, Klein brought together key elements from his long career: graphic form, composition and colour from the early murals and paintings juxtaposed with ground-breaking fashion and street photos, along with the narrative and bold visual language of his experimental films. A defining moment where his unique vision came full circle. – Extract

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William Klein + Daido Moriyama : Tate Modern – Exhibition

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09
Jul
12

Cristian del Risco : ‘Solamente…’ Series (Artworks)

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In his works Cuban artist Cristian del Risco blends painting, drawing, graphic design and photography.

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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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‘Untitled’
Pigment Print on Canvas
50 x 75 cm
2005
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Cristian del Risco says that he’s always taking new photographs, which he exposes and scans as part of his process, ultimately becoming part of his finished works It’s a lot of mixing and experimentation, he explains. “They are like a combination of graphic design with photography, there are some illustrations, but I tend to combine graphic design with photographs more, I also use old photographs.”

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Cristian del Risco : ‘Solamente…’

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02
Jul
12

Joachim Ljunggren : ‘Atom Boy’ (Motion Graphics)

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Playing with physics and other ideas in Cinema 4D.

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Music is by Hecq – Steeltongued (Tobias Lilja remix)

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Joachim Ljunggren : Website

Joachim Ljunggren : Vimeo

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14
May
12

Alvin Lustig : Illustrations (The Ghost in the Underblows)

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“Ghost in the Underblows” (1940) for Ward Ritchie Press, echoed Constructivist typecase
experiments from the early twenties yet revealed a distinctly native American aesthetic.

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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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Alvin Lustig introduced principles of modern art to graphic design that have had a long-term influence on contemporary practice. He was in the vanguard of a relatively small group who fervently, indeed religiously, believed in the curative power of good design when applied to all aspects of American life. He was a generalist, and yet in the specific media in which he excelled he established standards that are viable today. If one were to reconstruct, based on photographs, Lustig’s 1949 exhibition at The Composing Room Gallery, in New York, the exhibits on view and the installation would be remarkably fresh, particularly in terms of the current trends in art-based imagery. Lustig created monuments of ingenuity and objects of aesthetic pleasure. Whereas graphic design history is replete with artifacts that define certain disciplines and are also works of art, for a design to be so considered it must overcome the vicissitudes of fashion and be accepted as an integral part of the visual language. Though Lustig would consider it a small part of his overall output, no single project is more significant in this sense than his 1949 paperback cover for Lorca: 3 Tragedies. It is a masterpiece of symbolic acuity, compositional strength and typographic craft that appears to be, consciously or not, the basis for a great many contemporary book jackets and paperback covers. [Extract : Born Modern by Steven Heller]

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Alvin Lustig : Website

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12
May
12

Josef Schultz : Photography

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‘Form #16’
120 x 156 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Halle rot-grau #2’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2002
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‘Halle rot-grau #1’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2001
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‘Form #14’
120 x 160 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Rot-blau’
100 x 142 cm
C-Print
2004
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‘Blau-rot’
100 x 133 cm
C-Print
2001
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Josef Schulz is a “photographer” of modern warehouses and factories – trite industrial buildings that nobody would want to consider to be of any major architectural interest. All over the world these buildings are mass-produced, built for all kinds of industrial production processes using identical plans and blueprints. Their exteriors offer no hint whatsoever of the specific purposes for which they are used, their facades vary only in terms of the materials selected – all of them pre-fabricated, such as slabs of concrete, corrugated sheet metal and other cheap building materials. Josef Schulz does not aim at exposing this architecture in any way nor does he want to venture into a critical analysis of its appearance. He simply uses the photographs of the buildings to study the grammar of his trade. Schulz starts by taking traditional photographs of the halls, storage facilities and industrial structures with large sized photographic plates. Using digital image processing, the analogue picture produced is then “cleansed” of the few remaining hints that point to the age, location or environment of the buildings…

All details that might possibly allow conclusions concerning the actual size, users, time or place of the buildings are completely removed. The physical reality of the buildings is changed in such a way that they seem to become virtual blueprints designed to perfection. Schulz focuses on colours and shapes reducing them to simple block-like structures. Particular emphasis is given to symmetries, colour contrasts and the overall structure of the image: they thus become dominant components of the picture. The buildings now resemble toy architecture; and suddenly appear to be benign counterparts of themselves. He uses this type of processing to eliminate the gap between “photographic” and “painted” reality for the benefit of optimizing the picture. He reverses the photographic process by reducing the physical buildings to their design concepts and the photographically “real” picture to its original “virtual” one. Schulz thus opts for an approach that is diametrically opposed to that of producers of digital images – to make the rendering of artificial pictures appear as real as possible. The viewer is somewhat confused: he seems to recognize parts that appear to be authentic without being able to distinguish whether they were truly located before the camera or generated with the tools of digital image processing. By doing so, he distances himself from the “objectivity” of photography and shows that pictures are always the construct of the visual power of imagination of the artist. – [Extract]

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Josef Schultz : Website

Josef Schultz : More Works

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28
Apr
12

Manuel Geerinck : Conceptual Photography

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‘Untitled PH 2107’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2007
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‘Untitled’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2012
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‘Untitled PH 211’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2011
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‘Untitled PH 2709’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2011
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‘Untitled PH 1605’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2010
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‘Untitled PH 108’
140 x 120 cm
C-print
2011
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This work represent the most recent stage on my personal artistic path. From compositions on paper and paintings, I have expanded my research into conceptual photographs. Selected from raw, elemental works on paper, some drawings are cut apart and set into motion to become the basis of these images devised through a solely analogical method. In the act of displacement, these light sculptures are defined by a gesture of substitution as time caught on a surface. Originating from nameless forms, intact drawings and their constructed counterparts appear in fetish form. As the photographic support contracts and hardens, the transformed image gains strength through the radicalization of the process which progresses from manual drawing to mechanical reproduction. This experiment stands at the limit of this most contemporary field and leads the viewer to re-examine the image’s inner nature; the choreography of its pictorial elements gives it a new status as the dancing parts of the painted image become a photograph in its own original genre. ~ Extract : Artist Statement

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Manuel Geerinck : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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