Posts Tagged ‘linear

14
May
12

Alvin Lustig : Illustrations (The Ghost in the Underblows)

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“Ghost in the Underblows” (1940) for Ward Ritchie Press, echoed Constructivist typecase
experiments from the early twenties yet revealed a distinctly native American aesthetic.

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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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‘The Ghost in the Underblows’
Typographical illustrations
Alvin Lustig
1940
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Alvin Lustig introduced principles of modern art to graphic design that have had a long-term influence on contemporary practice. He was in the vanguard of a relatively small group who fervently, indeed religiously, believed in the curative power of good design when applied to all aspects of American life. He was a generalist, and yet in the specific media in which he excelled he established standards that are viable today. If one were to reconstruct, based on photographs, Lustig’s 1949 exhibition at The Composing Room Gallery, in New York, the exhibits on view and the installation would be remarkably fresh, particularly in terms of the current trends in art-based imagery. Lustig created monuments of ingenuity and objects of aesthetic pleasure. Whereas graphic design history is replete with artifacts that define certain disciplines and are also works of art, for a design to be so considered it must overcome the vicissitudes of fashion and be accepted as an integral part of the visual language. Though Lustig would consider it a small part of his overall output, no single project is more significant in this sense than his 1949 paperback cover for Lorca: 3 Tragedies. It is a masterpiece of symbolic acuity, compositional strength and typographic craft that appears to be, consciously or not, the basis for a great many contemporary book jackets and paperback covers. [Extract : Born Modern by Steven Heller]

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Alvin Lustig : Website

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14
Mar
12

Richard Stultz : ‘Almost Monochrome’ Series (Photography)

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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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‘Almost Monochrome’
Richard Stultz
Photograph
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Artist Statement

The urban landscape with its man-made structures confronts us all the time. We live, work, and play in it, but it’s so ordinary that we often don’t really see it. Our eyes take it in, but nothing registers internally, perhaps because the urban landscape seems rather unremarkable. With so many of these urban visual images continually flowing through our consciousness, we don’t see that there is more there. My interest is in making the unremarkable remarkable.

What a fascinating place the urban landscape is, with its intersection of architectural shapes, light, and color. Using these elements, I strive to create a structure within an image that’s especially satisfying. Sometimes the scene is mostly geometrical, consisting of trapezoids, rectangles, triangles, and circles. Sometimes it’s sweeping curves punctuated by straight lines and smooth gradations of light.

The interplay of these forms moves the eye to sense the interrelatedness of all of the shapes. The repetition of identical elements points, consolidates, and directs the eye toward other interesting elements. The shapes all vie for position, all want to take center stage, yet are unable to move. But the eye can move, the eye can see the relationships, and the eye can pull the image together into a whole.

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Richard Stultz : Website

Modernbook Gallery

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01
Mar
12

Yoonjin Jung : ‘Seeing the Unseen’ Series (Mixed Media)

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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2011
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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The main theme of Yoonjin’s work is ‘Seeing the Unseen’ which has been inspired by the emptiness in oriental painting. Her work explores the meaning of the empty space in oriental painting and the definition of invisibility in relation to the space. In fact some parts of her work seem unused. Yet they have been planned with as much care as the objects. What she wants to do in her work is to help the viewer to see the unseen and sense the invisible through both invisibility and visibility. Then the viewer is stimulated between the boundary of the invisibility and the visibility. – Yoonjin Jung : Artist Statement

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Yoonjin Jung : Website

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28
Oct
11

Brancolina : Photography

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20052011 14:32

‘20052011 14:32’
photograph
2011

agitation

‘agitation’
photograph
2011

tea for three

‘tea for three’
photograph
2011

parts

‘parts’
photograph
2011

gehry's tune

‘gehry’s tune’
photograph
2011

daydreaming

‘daydreaming’
photograph
2011

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brancolina : it is what it is

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03
Oct
11

Azurebumble : “Blue & Green” Series (Artworks)

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‘blue diamonds’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘zigzag blues’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘blue sky’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘greens meet blues’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘green pathway’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘blue note’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

‘green bird blues’
digital artwork
azurebumble
2011

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Azurebumble : Website

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25
Sep
11

Reinoud Oudshoorn : Sculptures

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“A sculpture must generate more space than it consumes”

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Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
size unknown
2008

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
85 x 90 x 17 cm
2008

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
65 x 87 x 17 cm
2005

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
72 x 93 x 18 cm
1999

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
72 x 93 x 18 cm
1999

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
70 x 49 x 19 cm
2003

Reinoud Oudshoorn
iron and matte glass
103 x 46 x 29 cm
1996

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Reinoud Oudshoorn takes the perspective of the illusory language in painting and applies it to his sculptures. He creates a bridge between the spatial illusion of the flat surface and the concrete reality of the three-dimensional sculpture. [Extract : Introduction]

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Reinoud Oudshoorn : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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