Posts Tagged ‘composition

04
Dec
12

William Klein : “Painted Contact Sheets” Series

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“The idea for the colour and graphics comes from the red lines
photographers put around their choices on a contact sheet.” W.K.

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106442

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William Klein_gordas

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William-Klein-Dakar-school’s-out-1985.-Painted-contact-1998-640x537

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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Gun-Gun-Gun-New-York-19551-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807247_8597808736_b-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5177807969_4d01b3b81a_z

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178409896_ce6bac97ae_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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5178408408_2a6ef687de_b

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
24 x 20″
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Klein returned to still photography in the 1980’s, ever progressive and unrelenting in his approach. Revisiting his work to that date, he made large-scale blow-ups of his photographic contact sheets, revealing on an unparalleled scale the frames before and after the decisive image. Liberally applying gloss brush strokes in bold colours to these mural-sized prints, Klein brought together key elements from his long career: graphic form, composition and colour from the early murals and paintings juxtaposed with ground-breaking fashion and street photos, along with the narrative and bold visual language of his experimental films. A defining moment where his unique vision came full circle. – Extract

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William Klein + Daido Moriyama : Tate Modern – Exhibition

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03
Apr
12

Cecil Touchon : ‘Nostalgic Regress’ – Fusion Series (Collage)

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I’m exploring the boundaries between art and poetry in these intimate papiers colles composed of bits of lettering and the empty spaces between. Stripped of literary meaning, they rely on composition, rhythm and visual movement to convey their meaning which is ambiguous and intuitive. These works are constructed from distressed street posters and billboards that have been edited into inlayed bits of printed matter creating passages that move from figure to ground and then reverse back to figure through gentle curves, irregular grids and subtle shading. Snippets of lettering almost become recognizable letters or perhaps proposals for a new poetic alphabet but always slip back into forms and spaces to create possibilities of enigmatic and open, simultaneously plausible interpretations. [CT]

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Fusion Series #2669
Collage on Paper
8 x 6 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2695
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2696
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2694
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2693
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2692
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2691
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Fusion Series #2690
Collage on Paper
5 x 4 in
2009
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Touchon’s work is a selection of collaged, acrylic paintings on either canvas or paper. There are several works from his Fusion Series, which present simple geometric shapes simply arranged, within illusionistic frames [framing devices]. There are overlapping rectangles, with rounded wedges that resemble irregularly cut pie sections. Occasionally he inserts bits of paper, spattered with Hebrew script or musical notations. Sometimes he paints paper then cuts out shapes. Other times, collage is in the form of paper applied to the surface, then painted over with solid color, so there is a ghost of a collage.

Most of these works contrast small areas of bright hue with overall neutrally colored surroundings. What is clear is the extent to which Cecil Touchon is in love with a formalism that, way back when, was loaded with revolutionary significance. That he does not think that those early experiments in pure shape and color have been improved upon at all is evident in the way he uses the motifs, and in the way he has antiqued them artificially with pencil shading and other means to make individual elements and the overall compositions into found artifacts…” ~ [Extract : Janet Tyson – Fort Worth Star-Telegram]

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Cecil Touchon : Website

Cecil Touchon : Photography

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29
Feb
12

Ishimoto Yasuhiro : ‘Katsura Imperial Villa’ (Photography)

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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘Katsura Imperial Villa’
Ishimoto Yasuhiro
Photograph
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‘I feel that there is a kind of fateful link between Bauhaus and me. I would like to donate fifty-five of my photographs to the Bauhaus Archive Berlin’, said Ishimoto Yasuhiro in a letter to the Bauhaus Archive…

Born in San Francisco, the son of Japanese immigrants, Ishimoto was trained as a photographer at the Chicago Institute of Design. He numbers among the few people who have ever received permission to photograph the interior and exterior spaces of the centuries-old architectural complex. The photos were mainly taken in the early 1950s and early 1980s. They portray the building, which was praised as exemplary by the architects Walter Gropius and Bruno Taut, within an intentionally modernist approach.

Many of the photographs that were mainly shot by Ishimoto in May 1954 were published in 1960 in the photobook Katsura together with texts by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius and the Japanese architect Kenzo Tange. The images deviate from the conventional standards of architectural photography, making no attempt to portray representative features. They show an eye for detail, often as abstract compositions in which lines organize the surface structure and textures fill the spaces between them…

The palace is segmented by Ishimoto into flat patterns that consist solely of grey tonal values. However, the subject of the photo always remains recognizable. Ishimoto fully exploits the available techniques of black-and-white photography with its dense black tones. His approach seems appropriate to the subject, yet also distant. [Ex : Between Japanese tradition and Western modernism]

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Remembering Modernisms Roots

Museum of Contemporary Art

Stephen Daiter Gallery

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01
Feb
12

Jessica Houston : ‘The Times’ Series (Paintings)

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“My work is an investigation of ephemera and transformation of the everyday. I often use found materials that either reveal or subvert underlying formative principles. Whether I’m painting over newspapers, making installations from objects collected in the Arctic, intervening in public spaces, or inviting scientists to interact, I am driven by subtle shifts in perception and a rearrangement of form. I’m drawn to the fleeting experience that allows for impermanence, chance, unpredictability and tenuous stability. I’m looking for the possibility of revelation through simple means, a place and a moment where now. dissolves into always, and always into now.” – Jessica Houston : Artist Statement

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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2007
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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Since 2006 I have been painting over newspapers adhered to wood panels – obliterating, whiting out, and rearranging the page. Working within the existing grid system to reveal and ultimately, undermine it, the act of painting echoes the ways in which the media selects, eliminates, and frames information. The paintings subvert and transform language, and create a new form made of line, mark, measure, and composition. In their multi-layered process of making these paintings become palimpsests, a place where chance and time collide. Alongside the trauma, beauty, and calamity of the everyday world, there is the possibility of silent observation. I also paint portraits of people from the newspaper. THis is largely a response to Susan Sontag’s ‘Regarding the Pain of Others’. I paint as a process of re-presenting the form, the information. In an era of information overload, painting offers a very different kind of response to the news, a human response, of the hand and the heart. – [Extract : J.H. Website]

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Jessica Houston : Website

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26
Jan
12

Virtual Republic : Z.K.O. Rollercoaster – ‘Great Emotions’

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Visualization of the 1st violin of the 2nd symphony, 4th movement by Ferdinand Ries in the shape of a rollercoaster. The camera starts by showing a close-up of the score, then focuses on the notes of the first violin turning the staves into the winding rail tracks of the rollercoaster. The notes and bars were exactly synchronised with the progression in the animation so that the typical movements of a rollercoaster ride match the dramatic composition of the music.[Extract : Vimeo]

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Client: Zurich Chamber Orchestra / Zürcher Kammerorchester
Creative Direction: Axel Eckstein, Frank Bodin
Agency: Euro RSCG, Zurich

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Created by virtual republic animation and visual effects
Animation: Marco Kowalik, Christian Marschalt
Animation Direction: President M. Klein
Technical Direction: Martin Chatterjee
Data Handling: Morris Willner
Compositing: Steffen Dünner
Producing: Gerhard Vetter
Modeling: Martin Sobott

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Making of Video : Vimeo

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04
Mar
11

Eric de Maré : Photography

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“a social conscience of visual values – more valid than ever”. Norman Foster

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Post Mill
Essex
Gelatin silver print
1960

Watermill
Halstead, Essex
Gelatin silver print
1960

Crumlin Viaduct
Ebbw Vale
Gelatin silver print
1954

‘Skyscraper’ fishermen’s sheds
the Stade, Hastings, Sussex
Gelatin silver print
1956

West Norwood cemetery
London
Gelatin silver print
1968

St Edward’s, Brotherton
Ferrybridge B power station
Gelatin silver print
1960s

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De Maré found beauty where it was least expected, in canal locks, viaducts, worn steps and boat sheds. These were utility structures with efficient design that appealed to many modern architects. His monochrome prints reveal textures that makes you want to reach out and grab the subjects of his images. The photos also presage the work of German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher, who made it their life work to chart the intricate differences and stark beauty of largely-ignored industrial architecture. Looking at his photos from the 50s and 60s, it’s particularly moving when you realise that many of the subjects no longer exist, swept away by the modernisation and “improvement” works of the following decades. Others have been neutered; for example, the warehouses at Gloucester Docks are now an antiques market and designer outlet. De Maré captured the last gasps of industrial Britain, with images softened by smoke and smog. It’s an unmissable trip down memory lane that has much to say for our present and future, particularly in terms of townscape and human-scale design. [G.Gardner}

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Eric de Maré : Riba

Eric de Maré : Guardian




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