Posts Tagged ‘dynamic

04
Dec
12

William Klein : “Painted Contact Sheets” Series

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“The idea for the colour and graphics comes from the red lines
photographers put around their choices on a contact sheet.” W.K.

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106442

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
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William Klein_gordas

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

William-Klein-Dakar-school’s-out-1985.-Painted-contact-1998-640x537

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

Gun-Gun-Gun-New-York-19551-640x533

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William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

5177807247_8597808736_b-640x533

::
William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

5177807969_4d01b3b81a_z

::
William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

5178409896_ce6bac97ae_b

::
William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
20 x 24″
::

5178408408_2a6ef687de_b

::
William Klein
‘painted contact’ series
silver gelatin print with paint,
24 x 20″
::

Klein returned to still photography in the 1980’s, ever progressive and unrelenting in his approach. Revisiting his work to that date, he made large-scale blow-ups of his photographic contact sheets, revealing on an unparalleled scale the frames before and after the decisive image. Liberally applying gloss brush strokes in bold colours to these mural-sized prints, Klein brought together key elements from his long career: graphic form, composition and colour from the early murals and paintings juxtaposed with ground-breaking fashion and street photos, along with the narrative and bold visual language of his experimental films. A defining moment where his unique vision came full circle. – Extract

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William Klein + Daido Moriyama : Tate Modern – Exhibition

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19
Oct
10

Lars Teichmann : Paintings

o.T.
acrylic on canvas
90 x 70 cm
2009

o.T.
acrylic on canvas
90 x 70 cm
2009

o.T.
acrylic on canvas
90 x 70 cm
2009

o.T.
acrylic on canvas
90 x 70 cm
2009

The new paintings of Lars Teichmann reflect the ambiguity that is culturally allotted with the color black. Black is central in the use of line and color as a way of forming meaning in the large-sized canvases. Teichmann’s paintings are just as melancholic as they are dynamically alive. The reduced color palette flows into vibrant energetic brush strokes: In a powerful gesture monochrome black is punctuated by white lines, wide swings, speckles and dissolving surfaces.

The striking chiaroscuro bridges the gap to Rembrandt, but also to the dramatic mood lighting of Caravaggio or the mystical, mysterious, almost expressionistic acting late Mannerist pictures of El Greco, the tense relationship of light and shadow comes in, to represent the full range of mental sensations. At the same time, Teichmann’s painting always remains semi-abstract. His visual worlds act objectively, without being too caught up in the concrete. [Extract : Kunstagenten]

Lars Teichmann : Website

12
Oct
10

Hélio Oiticica : Metaesquemas Series (1957–58)

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
550 x 640 mm
1958

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
250 x 324 mm
1958

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
295 x 387 mm
1959

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
293 x 387 mm
1959

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
295 x 387 mm
1958

Metaesquema
Gouache on cardboard
295 x 387 mm
1958

In the Metaesquemas series, Oiticica developed his ideas with what he described as ‘an obsessive dissection of space’ by means of colour. The series comprises over 350 works; its title combines the Portuguese words ‘meta’ (beyond vision) and ‘esquema’ (structure). Oiticica considered these works as ‘something that lies in-between that is neither painting nor drawing. It is rather an evolution of painting’. By reducing his vocabulary to a series of monochrome shapes – mainly squares and rectangles – Oiticica creates an interplay between shapes and their background that generates a sense of instability and movement, challenging their two-dimensionality.

This is partly achieved by the use of the ‘mirror effect’. Whatever rhythmic sequence the artist achieves on one side of the grid he repeats on the other side. This creates a dynamic composition, and a sense of ambivalence as to which are the painted forms (the ‘figures’) and which are the in-between areas (the ‘background’). By the end of 1958, this series evolved into black/white, blue/white, red/white, and white/white compositions in which squares, rectangles and even the grid have been eliminated. The series of white-on-white paintings represents both the end of one stage of chromatic investigations and a new beginning for the artist. [Extract : Tate Exhibition Guide]

Hélio Oiticica : Tate Modern : The Body of Colour




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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