Posts Tagged ‘Steel

11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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f_flick17653

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17701

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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17700

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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17758

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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17714

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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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470_1FLICK_07

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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17718

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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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25
Jan
12

Kristján Gudmundsson : Paintings in Gray and White Frames

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“I’m trying to work within the field of tension that exists between nothing and something.” — K.G.

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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
70 3/4″ x 7 3/4″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2009
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2009
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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Kristján Gudmundsson is an important and central figure of the first generation of Icelandic conceptual artists – intelligent, severe, humoristic and poetic. Gudmundsson began his career in the 1960s as a member of SÚM, a group of young artists, many of who were influenced by then-new currents in conceptual and installation art, mainly through the Fluxus movement. Kristján’s seemingly meandering oeuvre consisted of a series of works that were surprising in their manifestations and, despite their different appearance, formed an uncompromisingly consistent whole that respected the same values.

For his debut solo exhibition with Quint Contemporary Art, Gudmundsson exhibited new sound absorbing paintings. These works consisted of canvases painted in a single color and covered by mass-manufactured perforated grids normally used in the construction of sound-absorbing walls for building interiors. The result was simple but, as always with Kristján’s work, quite beautiful and multi-layered, evoking questions about the relationship of our different senses, the function of art and its possibilities.

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Kristján Gudmundsson : Quint Contemporary Art

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01
Dec
11

Kendall Buster : ‘New Growth’ (Architectural Structures)

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An inventory of architectural models that operates in the territory where architecture and biology might meet; an imagined city where old forms generate new forms through processes that suggest germination, budding, merging, hybridization, or absorption. This model city is a single organism conceived of as a functioning system of interdependent parts. It is also a grouping of autonomous structures that operate like competitive independent organisms in a loose highly provisional community. Some are connected by passageways that suggest either umbilical cords or parasitic invasions. Contiguous membranes create distinct regions in the city and the transparency of these membranes allow inner layer to be visible through outer shell. These porous membranes also operate as a continuous plane where an exterior protective shell wall folds to become an interior vessel lining wall.

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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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I have long been fascinated by the way in which architectural structures embrace, contain, shelter, frame, and even control the individuals who inhabit them, and explore this notion by building sculptures that for me operate both as scale models for imaginary buildings and as sites of enclosure with accessible spaces. My initial study in microbiology and my interest in the history of architecture results in works informed by both details of buildings from various historical periods and by biological morphologies. My aim is to build a sculpture that appears to have been built with a precise blueprint, while at the same time contradict this notion with some demonstration of that structure (or grouping of structures) as a dynamic system.

Though my sculptures reside in a place between object and architecture, most have human-scale chambers and all are constructed with a play between interior and exterior space. Some works are autonomous and singular, and these lone forms are typically designed with radial symmetry to suggest an enormous vessel or an isolated building. Here my design seems driven by a need for an almost classical sense of order and a ‘true center’ in the interior space of the form. However, in New Growth, as in most of my more recent works I build with heterogeneous parts in fields or in asymmetrical groupings, and this is for me resonant not only with the notion of biological growth, but also with the manner in which architectural structures form and re-form the fabric of cities over time. This new work reflects an expanded vocabulary of architectural sources and an interest in a shift towards greater complexity in the combination and collision of components in my design. [Extract : ‘New Growth’ Project]

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Kendall Buster : Website

Kendall Buster : Preparatory Work

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27
Feb
11

Elena Cazzaniga : Photography

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“il vero viaggio di scoperta non consiste nel cercare nuove terre ma nell’avere nuovi occhi “

(Marcel Proust)

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.....

“…..”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2009

<<<<<<<<

“<<<<<<<<”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2010

5x5

“5×5”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2010

\=\=\=\=\

“\=\=\=\=\”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2009

Love Boat

“Love Boat”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2010

stairs, lines and shadows

“Stairs, Lines and Shadows”
Elena Cazzaniga
Photograph
2010

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Elena Cazzaniga : More Works

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17
Aug
10

Christopher Conte : Sculpture

Steam Insect, 2007
Casted Bronze with Stainless components.
3 “wide x 5” tall x 3.5″deep (7.5cm x 12.5cm x 9cm)

Steam II Insect, 2009
Cast bronze with machined brass and stainless steel.
2.5 “tall x 6″ x 6” (6.5cm x 15cm x 15cm)

Articulated Singer Insect by Christopher Conte, 2005
Antique mechanical parts and vintage Singer sewing attachment.
8 “x 6″x 4” (20cm x 15cm x 10cm)

BLUE WIDOW by Christopher Conte
Steel, aluminum, carbon-fiber and glass-filled nylon recycled parts.
10″ x 8″x 4″ (25cm x 20cm x 10cm)

STEEL WIDOW II , 2009
Stainless Steel, Plated Brass and Aluminum components.
6 ” x 6″ x 2″ tall (15cm x 15cm x 5cm)

STEEL WIDOW I, 2008
[Based on concepts provided by Sirris]
Stainless steel, carbon steel, glass-filled nylon, aluminum, and brass
8 ” x 8 “x 2 ” (20 cm x 20 cm x 5 cm)

Born in Bergen, Norway, Christopher Conte was raised and currently lives in New York. After earning a Bachelors Degree in Fine Art (BFA) from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, he began working in the prosthetics field making artificial limbs for amputees which he did for 16 years as a Certified Prosthetist. Throughout his time in the field, Chris worked in obscurity creating biomechanical sculptures which reflected his love for biomechanics, anatomy and robotics. In June 2008, he left the field to begin his career as a full-time artist.

Christopher uses a wide range of experience along with diverse materials and construction techniques to create his unique one-of-a-kind pieces. The work is usually a combination of original cast components with found/recycled parts using materials ranging from bronze to carbon fiber. Many of the exotic materials used in both the aerospace industry and the medical field have found their way into his work. While a strong connection with future technologies is present in all of Chris’ work, ancient techniques such as lost-wax bronze casting have become an integral part of the process as well. The process involved in creating just one sculpture can often take weeks or even months.

[Extract : Christopher Conte Website Bio]

Christopher Conte Website




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