Posts Tagged ‘emotion

29
Jul
12

Christopher Anderson : “Capitolio” Series (Photography)

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“Emotion or feeling is really the only thing about pictures I find
interesting. Beyond that it is just a trick.” Christopher Anderson

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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2005
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2006
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2005
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2006
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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Capitolio is documentary photographer Christopher Anderson’s cinematic journey through the upheavals of contemporary Caracas, Venezuela, in the tradition of such earlier projects as William Klein’s New York (1954–55) and Robert Frank’s The Americans (1958). It presents a poetic and politicized vision, by one of todays finest documentary photographers, of a city and a country that is ripping apart at the seams under the stress of popular unrest, and whose turmoil remains largely unreported by Western media. No stranger to such fraught situations (he covered the 2006 conflict between Hezbollah and Israel from its inception), he notates the country’s current incongruities, where the violent and the sensual intermingle chaotically. “The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government,” he writes, elaborating on the title of this volume; “here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. Decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Chavez called a ‘revolution.'” X

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Christopher Anderson : Website

Christopher Anderson : Magnum Photos

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12
Jul
12

Masahisa Fukase : “The Solitude of Ravens” (Photography)

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Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII. Fukase growing up in a decade in which mannered self-control was not the ideal civic behavior. This new perspective, coupled with the effects of war, exploded into the avant-garde scene in Tokyo. Inelegant printing techniques emerged and the manic style of photography that he shared with his contemporaries, such as Eikoh Hosoe, Daidoh Moriyama, and Shomei Tomatsu, reflected the “reaction to a world turned upside down.”

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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase’s expressionist photo series on the species of ravens represents a ten-year-obsession with the dark-edged worlds of ravens, shot on annual trips from Tokyo to Hokkaido, Fukase’s birthplace. Clearly the omen of misfortune, that has been traditionally assigned to ravens in almost all cultures, reigns over the sombre photographs taken. These display isolated or massive groupings of ravens, variously appearing at night or by day throughout a diverse Japanese landscape. Sitting on telephone poles, at the beach or on the edges of villages, the ravens’ immutable and terrifying presence permeates these photographs with signs of potential, impending or sure loss. The darkened nature of the pictures might not be coincidental regarding that they were taken in a period of personal pain and suffering after the photographer’s divorce in 1976. Fukase’s works are part of the Japanese new photography that is wrenched into different forms based on the spirit of personal experience and contrasting the earlier ideal of mannered self-control [Extract : Artnet]

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Masahisa Fukase : Wirtz Gallery

Masahisa Fukase : Robert Mann Gallery

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02
May
12

Ben Ali Ong : Photography Series

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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Ballads of the Dead and Dreaming’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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Throughout my work I have been primarily interested in the suggestive possibilities between the images, and the open narrative I can create by juxtaposing the interior and exterior world beside each other. Portraits next to landscape, for example, and the tension between these two environments. Whilst there are reoccurring motifs and symbols that appear throughout, the importance is on mood, metaphor and emotion, and how different subjects can both carry these feelings and somehow come together, creating my own ambiguous black and white world – similar in a way to the surrealist 1920’s film noir. Birds are frequent symbols that appear throughout the work. Inspired by mythology, they assume a variety of roles. They have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages, and are seen to link the human world to the divine. Silhouetted birds in the cloud scape, brooding vistas, faces emerging from darkness, all come together in an attempt to produce an imaginative and mysterious landscape. Early visual influences for me have been Caravaggio and Francis Bacon, beginning with a general attraction to the darker sensibilities of each artists work and it’s sometimes macabre nature. The use of stark, direct lighting and heavy shadows in Caravaggio’s paieces, as well Bacon’s apparent painted ‘blur’ have both made their technical influences. By shooting 35mm black and white film and layering negatives together during the scanning stage, as well as the use of surface scratching and inscriptions to the negative, I try evoke a dream like detachment of an earlier age. BAO

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Ben Ali Ong : Website

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27
Apr
12

Charlotte Thoemmes : Photography

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We all may share the same sensual image of the environment. What we perceive, feel, and
reflect upon, however, may be as unique as every single person… ~ Charlotte Thoemmes

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‘White Doves for Sale’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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‘The Journey’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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‘White Doves for Sale’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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‘White Doves for Sale’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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‘The Journey’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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‘In Between’ Series
Charlotte Thoemmes
Photograph
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Natural environments and urbanized areas inspire my images, in which I present questions that range from identity to mortality. In my imagery, I attempt to explore places where a dialog emerges between the inner world of people and the environment . There I intuitively create my dream-like visions, make the unseen apparent, paint with light and shadow. In my images I’m not trying to frame my own subjective construction of reality, but rather try to animate the recipient to question their own perception. I want my images to provide a space where the viewers can project their own associations.

Experimental working techniques, either in-camera or in the darkroom often lead me to push the boundaries of photography. I create images with multiple exposures and selective haziness to capture feelings of loss and transformation through time. By painting on the light-sensitive paper or directly on the negative I create additional layers that were unseen by my eye, but felt emotionally. Photography provides possibilities to capture memories of the physical and the emotional state of people and places.

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Charlotte Thoemmes : Website

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28
Feb
12

Brancolina : ‘Jewish Museum in Berlin’ (Photography)

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Photo impressions of the Jewish museum in Berlin, designed by Daniel Libeskind.

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‘anxiety’
brancolina
2011
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‘agitation’
brancolina
2011
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‘fear’
brancolina
2011
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‘exile’
brancolina
2011
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‘remembrance’
brancolina
2011
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‘untitled feeling’
brancolina
2011
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Nothing is unimportant. There is no place without history, where you can just do what
you want. Every place speaks in a unique way. It needs to communicate a certain way
and to appeal to people. Architecture is an art of communication – not with words, but
with proportions and with an aura. Every building must tell a story. – Daniel Libeskind.

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Brancolina : Website

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23
Feb
12

Fernand Hick : Photography

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‘Roof window’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘Reading between the lines’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘Bench seat’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘On the wave…’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘Deckchairs’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘A nice roof’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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‘Triangle’
Fernand Hick
Photograph
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“I am a very personal and original photographer, whose working-method aims to transfer in my images the feelings I experienced while shooting. I am above all an atmosphere photographer. My atmosphere captures results from a subtle mixture between fuzzy zones and perfectly sharp ones.” – Fernand Hick

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Fernand Hick : More Works

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