Posts Tagged ‘spaces

11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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f_flick17653

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17701

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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17700

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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17758

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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17714

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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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470_1FLICK_07

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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17718

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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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01
Aug
12

Aras Karimi : Photography Series

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“I was only 5 years old when light first grabbed my attention. I was sitting in a room by a window with shuttered heavy curtains, leaving only a small distance in between them, where a miracle was happening. Contrasting with the dark room a ray of light was brightening a narrow space, I could see the playful movement of dust in the air that was visible to me for the first time. I was mesmerized, not just for seeing the dust but for feeling something novel, powerful, and beautiful: – light.” ~ Aras Karimi

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aras karimi
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aras karimi
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aras karimi
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aras karimi
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photograph
aras karimi
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photograph
aras karimi
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aras karimi
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aras karimi
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Photography is a relationship between light and film: light as a playful actor and film as a serious recorder. A photographers job, experimental by nature, is to write the best scenario for this one-time instant play. A genuine play is inevitably the result of accurate eyes, free mind, and fundamentals of photography at heart. Light is the subject of my works. Unlike the usual process in photography that uses light as a mean to record a scene and tell its story, I’m interested in light as a story teller. In fact the scene in my works is the medium to picture light, its mood on different surfaces, and its personality in different spaces. My photographs are purposefully Untitled. I like to give a chance to the viewer to experience their own emotion while they’re coinciding with an expression of mine. It’s also unnatural to apply a rational meaning to something that is opposite from being a product of intellect as all of my works are pure reflections of my vision, and emotion at the moment the shot is taken.” Artist Statement

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Aras Karimi : Website

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06
Jan
12

William Eckersley : “Dark City” Series (Night Photography)

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Initially inspired by the stillness of London at night, photographer William Eckersley began experimenting in late 2007 and after four years of stunning large format photography, he’s published a book of these works called ‘Dark City’ which promise a compelling view of unseen London. –  view here

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‘Factory, Tree And Moon Behind Silhouette, RM9’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Spotlit Steps From Fire Exit, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Trolleys In Car Park, CR0’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Bridge Over Canal, E15’
(c-type print / 2009)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Bend In Pedestrian Tunnel, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Shopping Arcade, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Lake And Four Housing Blocks, SE2’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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At night, a once flat world illuminated by dull, grey daylight is transformed under the cloak of darkness. Garish spotlighting casts deep shadows and silhouettes, with hues of pink, cyan and orange. The stage is devoid of its human players and seems to showcase the scenery’s forgotten beauty, revealing a stark and otherworldly aesthetic in a city drained of its occupants. The built environment, deliberately contrived to service the needs and desires of humanity, makes sense in the context of teeming human life – without this however, its inherent functionality no longer visible, our urban spaces appeared to stand forlorn, waiting to be judged on their genius or folly, beauty or ugliness… [Extract : Stucco Press]

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William Eckersley : Stucco Press

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30
Aug
11

Aras Karimi : Photography

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“I was only 5 years old when light first grabbed my attention. I was sitting in a room by a window with shuttered heavy curtains, leaving only a small distance in between them, where a miracle was happening. Contrasting with the dark room a ray of light was brightening a narrow space, I could see the playful movement of dust in the air that was visible to me for the first time. I was mesmerized, not just for seeing the dust but for feeling something novel, powerful, and beautiful: light.” Aras Karimi

::

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

‘untitled’
photograph
aras karimi

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I look at photography as a relationship between light and film: light as a playful actor and film as a serious recorder. The job of a photographer, which is experimental by nature, is to write the best scenario for this one-time instant play. A genuine play is inevitably the result of accurate eyes, free mind, and fundamentals of photography at heart.

Light is the subject of my works. Unlike the usual process in photography that uses light as a mean to record a scene and tell its story, I am interested in light as a story teller. In fact the scene in my works is the medium to picture light, its mood on different surfaces, and its personality in different spaces.

All of my photographs are purposefully Untitled. I like to give a chance to the viewer to experience their own emotion while they are coinciding with an expression of mine. It is also unnatural to apply a rational meaning to something that is opposite from being a product of intellect as all of my works are pure reflections of my vision, and emotion at the moment the shot is taken.” [Aras Karimi : Statement]

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Aras Karimi : Website

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21
Mar
11

Marco Tirelli : Mixed Media on Paper

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“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

“Untitled”
mixed media on paper
140 x 112 cm
2008

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The artist attempted to draw our attention to the internal coherence that characterizes his work over time. While the consistent foundation for Tirelli’s art is geometric abstraction, his paintings are not rigidly rationalist, deterministic, aprioristic, or deductive. The artist does not devise disembodied schemas, and his forms, volumes, and spaces–while primary, even elementary–are not ideal essences but instead seem impregnated by the empirical concreteness of experience as we perceive it.

Tirelli often works with deviations of perspective, perceptual “slips,” and spatial incongruities of vision, from which optical ambiguities cannot help but arise. Many of his forms and volumetric planes result from the progressive purification and distillation of everyday objects such as boxes and drawers, stairs and shelves. And his colors are never pure or harsh but are subtly modulated with light and shade; in other words, they are colors of real life and not its projection or ideal model. [Extract : ArtForum]

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Marco Tirelli : Studio Trisorio

Marco Tirelli : Galleria dello Scudo

Marco Tirelli : Galleria Alessandro Bagnai

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29
Sep
10

Friederike von Rauch : Photography

Friederike von Rauch
Gent #20
Pigment print
2009

Friederike von Rauch
Berlin #5
C-print mounted on aluminium
2002

Friederike von Rauch
Brussels #2
C-print mounted on aluminium
2006

Friederike von Rauch
Brussels #6
C-print mounted on aluminium
2006

Friederike von Rauch
Dienerkammer #3
Pigment print
2008

Friederike von Rauch photographs buildings. A complete building or merely a detail. The building on its own, or within its surroundings. The interior or the exterior. Her photographs are meticulously stylized. The framing and the angle are chosen with care. She describes herself as an intuitive photographer. Her work is not so much about buildings. It’s about spaces. She looks for spots that to her are exceptional, but that most people walk by without even a glance.

In her photographs the silence is the first thing that strikes you. The silence, however, does not equal quiet. There is a tension to the silence. This tension grows from the absence of people; despite the unbreakable link between buildings and human beings. Buildings are made by people and are used by them. The lack of a human presence deprives the buildings of their functionality. The buildings in her photographs are no longer buildings, but monumental sculptures. [Extract : Gallery 51]

Friederike von Rauch : Website

Kunstagenten Gallery

Fifty One




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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