Posts Tagged ‘color

23
Jun
12

Ezra Stoller : Architectural Photography

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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1962
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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1959
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Louis Isidore Kahn, Olivetti Underwood Factory, Harrisburg
Gelatin Silver Print
Ezra Stoller
1966-1970
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Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1963
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Milwaukee War Memorial, Eero Saarinen
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1952
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Ezra Stoller’s gelatin silver prints include images of architectural interiors and iconic landmarks. Based on his background in architecture and industrial design, Stoller used a large-format camera to photograph monumental 20th century buildings, including the Guggenheim Museum, the TWA terminal at Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), the Seagram Building, the Salk Institute, Yale Art and Architecture Building and Fallingwater. In addition to well-known photographs of these locations, these works also include lesser-known photographs of small homes and guest houses which provide a fresh look at the masterful eye that established Stoller as the preeminent photographer of modern architecture. A pioneer in the field of architectural photography, Ezra Stoller was commissioned by architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Marcel Breuer and Richard Meier, because of his unique ability to capture the building according to the architect’s vision and to lock it into the architectural canon. His photographs convey a three-dimensional experience of architectural space through a two-dimensional medium, with careful attention to vantage point and lighting condition, as well as line, color, form and texture. – [Extract : Press Release – Yossi Milo Gallery]

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Ezra Stoller : Yossi Milo Gallery

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16
Apr
12

El Lissitzky : ‘Prouns’ Series

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the station where one changes from painting to architecture.” ~ El Lissitzky

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‘Announcer’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Globetrotter in Time’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Neuer (New Man)’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Untitled’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Tatlin at Work’
El Lissitzky
1921
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‘Proun G7’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’ was essentially El Lissitzky’s exploration of the visual language of suprematism with spatial elements, utilizing shifting axes and multiple perspectives; both uncommon ideas in suprematism. Suprematism at the time was conducted almost exclusively in flat, 2D forms and shapes, and El Lissitzky, with a taste for architecture and other 3D concepts, tried to expand suprematism beyond this. His Proun works spanned over a half a decade and evolved from straightforward paintings and lithographs into fully three-dimensional installations. They would also lay the foundation for his later experiments in architecture and exhibition design. While the paintings were artistic in their own right, their use as a staging ground for his early architectonic ideas was significant. In these works, the basic elements of architecture – volume, mass, color, space and rhythm – were subjected to a fresh formulation in relation to the new suprematist ideals. Through his Prouns, utopian models for a new world were developed. This approach, in which the artist creates art with socially defined purpose, could aptly be summarized with his edict “das zielbewußte Schaffen” – “task oriented creation.” ~ [Ext]

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El Lissitzky : More Works

El Lissitzky : Russian Constructivists

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17
Nov
11

Mark Valentine : Photography

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gashes

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‘gashes’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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dynamics of a moment

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‘dynamics of a moment’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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‘m1’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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shape paths

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‘shape paths’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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unfathomable

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‘unfathomable’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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pool rising

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‘pool rising’
mark valentine
photograph
2010
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Mark Valentine : More Works

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22
Dec
10

Chris Metze : mixed media on board

untitled
mixed media on board
27 x 20 inches
2010

untitled
mixed media on board
27 x 20 inches
2010

untitled
mixed media on board
27 x 20 inches
2010

untitled
mixed media on board
27 x 20 inches
2010

untitled
mixed media on board
27 x 20 inches
2010

I’m interested in the non-verbal dialogue that occurs between line, shape, and color. The elements in my paintings are composed of shapes that are indistinct. They may appear to be something specific, but that remains in question. This uncertainty, as well as their interaction within what appears to be a landscape, is at the core of my paintings. I’m interested in the line that divides the perceived rational world from the inner landscape. In my work I’m focusing on composing and dissolving of forms, creating paintings that are both organic and structured, often whimsical. I’m inspired by relationship that exists between land and sky and the forms that link the two together; the gaseous quality of smoke or a mist combined with the rigid form of a tower; the expansiveness of a body of water met with undecipherable man made structures; to make solid the space that lays between two elements creating a unique form. [artist statement]

Chris Metze : Website

Chris Metze : Kathryn Markel Fine Arts

09
Nov
10

Alex Posada : Making of ‘The Particle’

“The Particle” is a kinetic sculpture that experiments with color, sound and movement. The continuous rotation, speed and light create visual POV, effects that define the spatial structure of the object. The translucent skin created from the moving light becomes visible, creating shape and volume, both inside and outside the object. How light emerges from the limited movement of each of the rings when there is a change in external conditions (visitors) or there is a random mutation. The sculpture forms and reacts by generating events that modulate the sound and space, constantly changing atmosphere and perception. Given that the regulatory mechanism of the entire design is based on the decision making haphazard manner, the new models are emerging from the previous naturally. The vibration of sound, color and visual patterns evolve into chaos or order according to evolutionary algorithms that govern it. The structures generated in this process can not be anticipated and evolve through continual iterations involving alterations to the programs and exploring the changes through interaction with the visitor and the software. The object, at the same time is a space for sensory and kinesthetic experience, a body with its own internal resonance.

Technology
RGB leds, POV animation and robotic structure
Custom hardware with zigbee wireless controllers
Software for designing animation and controling lighting
3D sound

Support & credits
Technology of the Kinetic Sculpture: MID
Supported by hangar.org and Strobe Festival

Concept & Direction: Alex Posada
Design: Bartosz Zygmunt
Electronics: M. A. de Heras
Mechanics: Raul M. Beteta

Alex Posada : Blog

Alex Posada : Vimeo

21
Sep
10

Jenny Okun : Photography

Bergamot White Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Morphosis Beverly Building Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1988

Getty Shadows Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Getty Terrace Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Carmy House Floor Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1995

Okun records architectural structures through multiple exposures. Using a large-format Hasselblad camera, she takes a picture, then advances the film only slightly to achieve a layering effect. A single image may comprise six such overlays, which might then become part of a triptych. Okun’s background is in film, so it follows that the spatial information unfolds sequentially; the images are fragmented and superimposed, causing unexpectedly lyrical interpretations of buildings and space to emerge.

Yet for all their abstraction, what is also compelling about these images is their essentially traditional approach to the documentation of architecture. These days, architectural photography tends to consider circumstances beyond the built form:- climate, use, landscape, and human accessibility — to position the building in its social and environmental context. Okun, however, sticks to the structural facts; her images read as formal records and revelations of space, form, color, and light.

[Extract : Metropolis Magazine, May 1996 : Harmonious Fragments By Akiko Busch]

Craig Krull Gallery

Jenny Okun : Website

Kashya Hildebrand Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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