Posts Tagged ‘grids

12
Jul
13

Azurebumble :: ‘Folds and Forms’ series (Photography)

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folds 1

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‘fold a’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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forms 1

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‘form a’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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folds 2

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‘fold b’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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forms 2

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‘form b’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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caged 5

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‘fold c’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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forms 3

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‘form c’
photograph
azurebumble
2013
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Azurebumble :: Ipernity

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11
Jul
13

Robbert Flick :: ‘Arena’ Series (Urban Photography)

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f_flick17653

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‘AR77159-21’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17701

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‘AR77159-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17700

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‘AR77156-22’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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flick 9

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‘AR79032-13’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17707

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‘AR78119-12A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17758

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‘AR77166-30’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1977
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f_flick17709

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‘AR79026-33’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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f_flick17714

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‘AR79044-10A’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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470_1FLICK_07

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‘AR78101-32’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1978
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f_flick17718

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‘AR79060-19’
‘Arena’ series
16 x 20 in
1979
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What Ansel Adams did for Yosemite, Los Angeles photographer Robbert Flick did for a parking garage in Inglewood. He made the place into the object of his obsession and the focus of his commanding technical skill, and in the process he transformed it into a site of exquisite wonder for us. Obviously there are some differences between Half Dome and parking level 3. One is unique, the other prosaic. But the humdrum anonymity of Flick’s raw subject matter only serves to makes his gorgeous prints more impressive. The subject of parking structures is universal in the modern world, while also standing as an icon for the distinctive urban experience that Los Angeles represents. Flick’s notion of photographing inside a parking garage was not a gimmick or a passing fancy. For more than two years — 1977 through 1979 — he lugged his cameras, lenses, tripods and other equipment to the multistory concrete structure near his studio, and he photographed no other landscape. No cars or people intrude upon the pristine wilderness of this parking structure. It is “an unsettled, uncultivated region left in its natural condition,” as my dictionary defines it…

And it’s gorgeous — a complex construction of imposing planar walls, taut steel cables and orthogonal spaces composed on a multidimensional grid. The labyrinth is infused with a mixture of natural and fluorescent light, which the artist manipulates in the rich tonalities of his exquisite black and white prints. Scuffed pavement, cinder block walls, concrete pillars and directional signs emerge with the physical dignity and emotional gravity of the Pantheon in Rome or the Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan. Except for an occasional glimpse of sky, nothing but a man-made environment is ever seen. That’s probably the biggest difference between Flick’s parking structure and Adams’ Yosemite. The Angeleno is incisively photographing within a landscape shaped by the organizing principle of the automobile, rather than the organic template of nature. This is its shrine. In fact two modern machines intersected in the making of Flick’s art — the car and the camera. He calls attention to both simultaneously — the unseen car through subject matter and the unseen camera through a combination of obviously artful composition, exquisite printing technique and frank visual acknowledgment of the pictorial tradition of artistic landscape photography (including Watkins and Adams). Never coy, condescending or ironic, the photographs are instead epic — even primeval. His pictures record the junction of car and camera with sincerity and reverence. And, why not? It is the monumental landscape within which we live… [ Extract :: Christopher Knight – The Los Angeles Times ]

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Robert Mann Gallery

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22
Nov
12

Mattia Mognetti : “Istigkeit” Series (Digital Constructions)

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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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Mattia Mognetti
“Istigkeit” Series
digital collage
2010
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“In 2010 I began to ride my congenital attraction for architecture: its huge volumes and gigantism, its shapes and textures… Fascinated by perspective I was taking photographs without fully understanding what my attention was being attracted too, what I was trying to represent with a shot and subsequent post-production. Photography was an opportunity to take a fragment of reality and give it a meaning, but also, conversely, as an expedient to let a significance take possession of reality to bring out himself. The contrast between these two visions became the source of my own reflections. Slowly I realized that psychology was an integral part of my creative experience. That I was not trying to represent architecture, but to use a photograph as way to strike and confuse my perceptive system. Therefore I started producing the first works that were later to be structured in the “Istigkeit” series…

While creating these images i realized that i was getting ever closer to the idea which was guiding me. Trying to invalidate the perceptual and cognitive mechanisms involved in the conceptualization of a given entity by our brains. At first sight each work in the “Istigkeit” series seems different from what it is; and what it is; is not always visible, or at least not clear and obvious. Volumes are artificially combined in the shadows and give rise to solids whose meticulous analysis reveals their illusory value. You follow a surface which then splits. You focus on walls and windows, but these interact and merge into conflicting objects and paradoxical perspectives. The sight is lost in the complexity of textures, intersections and overlays. Nothing is what it is and everything is what it seems. And sometimes, during the perception of what it seems, inside the mental mechanisms that lead to the interpretation of any given scenario, it’s possible your Ego cannot impose itself on a more primitive interpretation, rooted both in individual, collective, cultural and archetypal symbolic components…” ~ Mattia Mognetti

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Mattia Mognetti : Website

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23
Apr
12

Azurebumble : ‘AI : Series’ (Photography Book)

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Recently, I’ve curated a number of image series by photographers from ‘Flickr’ on my blog ‘Aesthetic Investigations’. Subsequently, I thought it would be interesting to document these works in a book. Therefore, i’ve arranged a collection of ’39’ abstract and minimal photographic series by these ’32’ artists. A selection of pages from the book can be viewed below, a full book preview can be seen: HERE

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Thank you to everyone who contributed their images to this project.

All graphic content and curations by : Alan Wilson ( azurebumble )

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Book Cover
Front & Back Pages
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Introductory Pages
Copyright & Contents
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Introductory Pages
Tags, Artists & Series Thumbnails
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Photography Series
Gianni Galassi
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Photography Series
Teresa (Colourful Life) & roB_meL
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Photography Series
Camilo Todemann & Olli Kekäläinen
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Photography Series
Brancolina & Barbara Stumm
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Photography Series
Françoise Lucas & Leonie Polah
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Photography Series
Julian Gomez & Tom Mclaughlan
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Artists

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Alec Cheer……………………Annemie Hiele……………………..Azurebumble……………………Barbara Stumm

Brancolina………………….Camilo Todemann…………………..Daniel Molina…………………….Fernandoprats

Françoise Lucas…………….Gianni Galassi…………………….James Withey……………….John Kosmopoulos

Julian Gomez……………Krystina Stimakovits…………………Leonie Polah………………………….Lillykeeper

Lord Jezzer…………………..Lucie Bourassa…………………..Mark Valentine…………………..Olli Kekäläinen

Peter Moons…………………..Phédia Mazuc……………………..Rita Vita Finzi…………………………….roB_meL

Shari Baker……………………Steffen Tuck………………..Teresa (Colourful life)…………..Tom McLaughlan

Visualisarium…………………..Wilma Eras……………………Wouter Hogendorp……………………….Zel Nunes

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VIEW FULL BOOK PREVIEW AND PURCHASE HERE

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20
Mar
12

Sarah McKenzie : Construction Paintings

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‘Big Box’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2010
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‘Black Box’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2010
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‘Interior 2’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2008
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‘Construction 6 pile’
Oil on Wood
20 x 20 in
2008
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‘Fixture’
Oil on Wood
36 x 36 in
2010
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‘Seam’
Oil on Canvas
72 x 72 in
2008
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‘Construction 4’
Oil on Wood
20 x 20 in
2007
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For many years, until 2005, I painted aerial views of suburban sprawl. In my recent work, I have “zoomed in,” to focus on individual tract homes and commercial structures captured in a state of partial construction. These paintings explore the building process and, in it, find a metaphor for the activity of painting. I hope to draw a connection between the construction of a building out of raw materials ( lumber, steel, concrete ) and the construction of a picture out of raw materials ( paint, canvas, wood.)

My paintings are informed both by three-dimensional architectural space and by the pictorial “space” of twentieth century Modernist painting. The generic forms of suburban architecture provide a convenient framework through which I explore the basic structures and issues of geometric abstraction — stripes, grids, flatness vs. depth, color relativity, and so forth. Many of my recent works are marked by distinct moments of visual rupture, where the picture as a whole becomes fragmented.

I am applying paint to the surface in any number of incongruent ways, juxtaposing various painting “styles,” leaving sections of the painting support unpainted, and otherwise undermining the potential for illusionistic space. This disruption of the viewer’s experience is disorienting, but in a good way, for it enables the viewer to see the picture with fresh eyes – to see the picture itself as a construction. The underlying structure of the image is revealed, like the skeletal frame of a building.

At this point, my work is only peripherally about suburbia. Tract homes and strip malls provide the fodder for the paintings and help to place them in a specific cultural moment in time, but the work is ultimately about paint and the nature of pictures. To the extent that my paintings still comment on suburbia, it is through the moments of visual rupture described above, which may be interpreted as revealing the cracks in the suburban American dream. ~ [ Extract : Sarah McKenzie – Artists Statement ]

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Sarah McKenzie : Website

Sarah McKenzie : Jen Bekman Gallery

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05
Mar
12

Jan Gravekamp : ‘Zwaardstraat 16’ Series (Photography)

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Building designed by Netherlands architect Jan Duiker

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‘Zwaardstraat 16’
Jan Gravekamp
Photograph
2011
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‘Zwaardstraat 16’
Jan Gravekamp
Photograph
2011
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‘Zwaardstraat 16’
Jan Gravekamp
Photograph
2011
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‘Zwaardstraat 16’
Jan Gravekamp
Photograph
2011
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‘Zwaardstraat 16’
Jan Gravekamp
Photograph
2011
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Jan Gravekamp : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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