Posts Tagged ‘oil

27
Mar
12

Louise Belcourt : Paintings

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‘Mound 3’
Oil on Canvas
76 x 85 in
2011
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‘Hedgeland #19’
Oil on Canvas
57 x 67 in
2010
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‘Mound 2’
Oil on Canvas
61 x 67 in
2011
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‘Mound 1’
Oil on Canvas
30 x 41 in
2011
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‘Hedgeland #15’
Oil on Panel
22 x 28 in
2010
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‘Hedgeland #18’
Oil on Canvas
42 x 61 in
2011
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‘Hedgeland #16’
Oil on Panel
22 x 26 in
2010
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All of these paintings began with looking at real things in the world. For over a decade my focus has been on hedges and buildings for the simple reason that they are in my day to day periphery. Either in Brooklyn as the view out of the window or in Canada, where I go each year, these forms routinely are what are in my way by either blocking a ‘view’ or as a presence that I have to go around . They command my attention for their solidity and the way they sit on the earth’s surface. Constantly acknowledging these forms allows me to feel parallels with my own existence in the world.

Finding the color that will produce light, space and the feeling of hope, (goodness, elegance, rightness of purpose) in each work is part of my drive. But I also work with many of painting’s other elements to push for a physical sense of vastness. Through spatial and coloristic interplay, issues of space vs illusionism, conceptualism vs physicality, classicism vs newness, exist together. It’s in these co-existences that I hope to create in paintings, a freshness and a place where art, myself and the outer world, mesh. This is how I approach painting. It’s not that I’m painting a ‘landscape,’ it’s that I know I’m fundamentally a part of it and the reason for painting is to find out a bit more about that. – statement

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Louise Belcourt : Website

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10
Feb
12

Jai Llewellyn : ‘Inks’ Series (Works on Paper)

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‘What goes up must come down’
Ink & graphite on paper
40 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Immobility’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The calm after the storm’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Hot on your heels’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The land that time forgot’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Swiftly moving on’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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“My work is diverse. Predominantly I work in the field of abstract expressionism. The foundation of my work comes from an intensive study of the ‘nude’ and although the formal representation of the figure has completely vanished from my practice, there is an underlying system or structure that has it’s roots in the abstraction of the human form. I rarely plan or rehearse a piece, working intuitively I allow an image to evolve naturally, to have a life of its own. I am interested in the idea that when something is destroyed another is simultaneously created, as in reincarnation or rebirth. I often use surfaces that have previously been worked on, rather than a blank canvas, I react to existing marks or images. Working in this way produces results that I could not plan for or even imagine, and it is important that the ingredient which attracted me in the first instance is not completely lost but given a new life. Often I leave some of the original elements to pay respect to its contribution.” Jai Llewellyn : Artist Statement

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Jai Llewellyn : Website

Jai Llewellyn : RedBubble

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01
Feb
12

Jessica Houston : ‘The Times’ Series (Paintings)

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“My work is an investigation of ephemera and transformation of the everyday. I often use found materials that either reveal or subvert underlying formative principles. Whether I’m painting over newspapers, making installations from objects collected in the Arctic, intervening in public spaces, or inviting scientists to interact, I am driven by subtle shifts in perception and a rearrangement of form. I’m drawn to the fleeting experience that allows for impermanence, chance, unpredictability and tenuous stability. I’m looking for the possibility of revelation through simple means, a place and a moment where now. dissolves into always, and always into now.” – Jessica Houston : Artist Statement

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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2007
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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‘The Times’
Oil and Pencil on Newspaper
12″ x 16″ Wood Panel
2008
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Since 2006 I have been painting over newspapers adhered to wood panels – obliterating, whiting out, and rearranging the page. Working within the existing grid system to reveal and ultimately, undermine it, the act of painting echoes the ways in which the media selects, eliminates, and frames information. The paintings subvert and transform language, and create a new form made of line, mark, measure, and composition. In their multi-layered process of making these paintings become palimpsests, a place where chance and time collide. Alongside the trauma, beauty, and calamity of the everyday world, there is the possibility of silent observation. I also paint portraits of people from the newspaper. THis is largely a response to Susan Sontag’s ‘Regarding the Pain of Others’. I paint as a process of re-presenting the form, the information. In an era of information overload, painting offers a very different kind of response to the news, a human response, of the hand and the heart. – [Extract : J.H. Website]

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Jessica Houston : Website

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16
Nov
11

Lee Kaloidis : Paintings (Oil on Paper)

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#199, 07-21-11

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#199
07-21-11
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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#193, 06-07-11

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#193
06-07-11
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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#195, 06-12-11

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#195
06-12-11
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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#167 03-15-11

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#167
03-15-11
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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#163 03-04-11

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#163
03-04-11
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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#125 10-30-10

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#125
10-30-10
Lee Kaloidis
Oil 22×30-inch paper
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Lee Kaloidis is an improvisational composer and, like a lyric poet, works relatively quickly and without plan. From the first mark, a painting evolves towards a destination that is the byproduct of strongly intuited relationships. When excecuted, these relationships are intended to stand, though often are sacrificed as the work shifts and struggles to become an original whole. This unfolding makes each painting, and an entire series of paintings, an historic sequence of events. [extract : about the work]

“My painting is a direct byproduct of intense involvement in improvisational music and free-verse poetic composition. It is about change and movement, balance and unity, and ultimately about natural order. What drives movement is tension. I like to think of my paintings as places where the most divergent and surprising things collide, converging at just the right time into new expressions of unity.” Lee Kaloidis

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Lee Kaloidis : Website

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06
Oct
11

Hiroyuki Hamada : Sculpture

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#32
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 36 x 1.75 in
1998 – 2001

#64
hiroyuki hamada
28.5 x 4.5 in
1997 – 1998

#45
hiroyuki hamada
20 x 25 x 25 in
2002 – 2005

#37
hiroyuki hamada
36 x 12 in
1998 – 2002

#46
hiroyuki hamada
34 x 11 in
2003 – 2005

#53
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 14.5 in
2005 – 2008

#55
hiroyuki hamada
44 x 24 x 12.5 in
2005 – 2008

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Hiroyuki Hamada received his initial training as a painter and as such, the integration of form and surface are paramount to his process. He begins each sculpture by making a foam and wood core, builds it up with burlap and plaster, and finally applies a combination of enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, and wax to create an austere and mysterious finish.

His underlying forms imply a deep connection with the geometry of nature, but they remain non-representational. Basic shapes such as the circle, ellipse, and square are gently stretched and torqued under his hand. Hamada favors a limited palette, but he nonetheless conveys myriad ideas, objects, and emotional tones. It is perhaps one’s inability to “place” each work that makes it so richly allusive.

Indeed, Hamada’s sculpture may connote an archeological relic, a futuristic spaceship, or the microscopic worlds of cells and molecules, but these are the viewer’s personal speculations, not the artist’s deliberate intentions. The absence of descriptive titles – each work is numbered rather than titled – both frustrates and encourages these open interpretations. [Extract : Hiroyuki Hamada Blog]

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Hiroyuki Hamada : Website

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12
Jan
11

Lee Kaloidis : Paintings (Oil on Paper)

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’11-01-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’12-20-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’10-12-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’03-24-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’10-25-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis
Oil on paper
’12-30-10′
22″ x 30″

Lee Kaloidis is an improvisational composer and, like a lyric poet, works relatively quickly and without plan. From the first mark, a painting evolves towards a destination that is the byproduct of strongly intuited relationships. When excecuted, these relationships are intended to stand, though often are sacrificed as the work shifts and struggles to become an original whole. This unfolding makes each painting, and an entire series of paintings, an historic sequence of events. [extract : about the work]

“My painting is a direct byproduct of intense involvement in improvisational music and free-verse poetic composition. It is about change and movement, balance and unity, and ultimately about natural order. What drives movement is tension. I like to think of my paintings as places where the most divergent and surprising things collide, converging at just the right time into new expressions of unity.” Lee Kaloidis

Lee Kaloidis : Website




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