Posts Tagged ‘enamel

11
May
12

Graham Gillmore : Paintings (Works on Panel)

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‘Sunset Applause’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 60 in
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‘Answers To The Questions To The Answers’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘After You’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Trash the Planet’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 72 in
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‘Damp Wounds Sorely Mist’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
90 X 72 in
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‘Don’t be so Naive’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Wash Away Yovr Tears’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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The nature of my project has never been about boiling anything down, but rather exposing the complexities of human experience; particularly one’s self as subject and the world as object. The ‘self’ and the ‘other’ play a pivotal role as subject matter within my manipulations with language – locating, defining and ultimately obscuring any kind of singular ‘meaning’ behind or beneath the surfaces of the world. These games (self imploding sentences, misreadings , backfirings revisions, second thoughts etc.) offer access to the hope for authentic – if flawed – communication while confronting the indeterminacy of language, both literary and abstract. I use these self-conscious devices for a ‘defamiliarizing’ effect. Text allows the work to maintain a narrative thread while maintaining an allegiance to non-figurative imagery. I play the role of scavenger when it comes to the texts I use. I think of these selected fragments as a kind of linguistic ‘road kill’ – skeletons on which to hang the material of the painting. I am engaged with texts that evoke a certain prickliness or an emotional angle that is slightly askew, with an emphasis on themes rooted in an emotional or psychological realm rather than intellect. Sensation overides thought, just as fantasy takes the place of history. Statement

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Graham Gillmore : Monte Clark Gallery

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25
Jan
12

Kristján Gudmundsson : Paintings in Gray and White Frames

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“I’m trying to work within the field of tension that exists between nothing and something.” — K.G.

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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
70 3/4″ x 7 3/4″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2009
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2009
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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acrylic on canvas, steel, enamel
15 3/4″ x 23 1/2″ x 1 3/4″
kristján gudmundsson
2008
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Kristján Gudmundsson is an important and central figure of the first generation of Icelandic conceptual artists – intelligent, severe, humoristic and poetic. Gudmundsson began his career in the 1960s as a member of SÚM, a group of young artists, many of who were influenced by then-new currents in conceptual and installation art, mainly through the Fluxus movement. Kristján’s seemingly meandering oeuvre consisted of a series of works that were surprising in their manifestations and, despite their different appearance, formed an uncompromisingly consistent whole that respected the same values.

For his debut solo exhibition with Quint Contemporary Art, Gudmundsson exhibited new sound absorbing paintings. These works consisted of canvases painted in a single color and covered by mass-manufactured perforated grids normally used in the construction of sound-absorbing walls for building interiors. The result was simple but, as always with Kristján’s work, quite beautiful and multi-layered, evoking questions about the relationship of our different senses, the function of art and its possibilities.

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Kristján Gudmundsson : Quint Contemporary Art

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01
Nov
11

Karl Haendel : Works on Paper

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Abstract Chicago #1
charcoal on paper
60 x 49 in
2010

Abstract Chicago #3
charcoal on paper
60 x 49 in
2010

Abstract Chicago #2
charcoal on paper
60 x 50 in
2010

WK #4
Pencil and spray paint
30 x 22 in
2009

Somewhat Cubist #10
pencil and enamel
30 x 22 in
2009

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Los Angeles-based artist Karl Haendel works with large-scale graphite drawings. The themes of his works, largely appropriated, include political commentary, personal narrative, and Modernist forms.

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Karl Haendel : Tony Wight Gallery

Karl Haendel : Noma Gallery

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17
Oct
11

Michelle Mackey : Paintings

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“I’m currently working in black and white, on black, shiny, resin-coated panels.
Not unlike a hologram, the viewer must move around the surface, so the spatial
depth will be revealed. I am exploring what memory looks like – memory of place.”

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‘Keys’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘Dénouement’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘Trefoil’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘In the Hollow’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘Leap’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘Intermezzo’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

‘Duality’
acrylic and enamel
on resin-coated panel
47″ x 47″

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In the mind, individuals have a stockpile of images and feelings that merge undaunted by time and space separation. As I walk to the train, I smell the scent of the dogwood blossoms in the crisp morning air; the fresh smell immediately brings me to the front yard of my grandparents house, full of the voices, sounds, and colors so familiar. Likewise, in a painting, the coalescence of different images and actions on one planar surface confounds time, space, and sequence. Layers of images and ideas from different sources co-exist in paint; the associations brought into dialogue with each viewing become a part of the piece. What causes a particular memory (such as my grandparent memory) at a particular time and not at other times is beyond complete explanation; yet, it is not beyond understanding. Sensory understanding exists through experience, not through the medium of words.

The images in my paintings are mainly from the physical structures in my environment. I look at the surface mix of cracked mortar, shiny metal, peeling paint, and rusty scaffolds; I hear the rhythmic distance from chimney to chimney, branch to branch, and window to window; I think of the structural soundness of repetition, from the frame to the brick. As I work, I periodically refer back to these environmental sources, as well as conversations, books, music, patterns and other sources for ideas on color, form, and composition. The story of my process is embedded in layers of paint (layers of choices) visible on the canvas: a trail of past decisions shutting off certain paths to allow other possibilities. I’m searching, tweaking, scratching, both my mind and the image on the canvas, to uncover what I am really seeing and the process of how I see. On my microcosmic-level, I am looking into a larger system beyond the individual. I do not believe in chance or events without purpose, so I do feel that my search will reveal certain truths or aspects of a larger truth. [artist statement]

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Michelle Mackey : Website

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06
Oct
11

Hiroyuki Hamada : Sculpture

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#32
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 36 x 1.75 in
1998 – 2001

#64
hiroyuki hamada
28.5 x 4.5 in
1997 – 1998

#45
hiroyuki hamada
20 x 25 x 25 in
2002 – 2005

#37
hiroyuki hamada
36 x 12 in
1998 – 2002

#46
hiroyuki hamada
34 x 11 in
2003 – 2005

#53
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 14.5 in
2005 – 2008

#55
hiroyuki hamada
44 x 24 x 12.5 in
2005 – 2008

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Hiroyuki Hamada received his initial training as a painter and as such, the integration of form and surface are paramount to his process. He begins each sculpture by making a foam and wood core, builds it up with burlap and plaster, and finally applies a combination of enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, and wax to create an austere and mysterious finish.

His underlying forms imply a deep connection with the geometry of nature, but they remain non-representational. Basic shapes such as the circle, ellipse, and square are gently stretched and torqued under his hand. Hamada favors a limited palette, but he nonetheless conveys myriad ideas, objects, and emotional tones. It is perhaps one’s inability to “place” each work that makes it so richly allusive.

Indeed, Hamada’s sculpture may connote an archeological relic, a futuristic spaceship, or the microscopic worlds of cells and molecules, but these are the viewer’s personal speculations, not the artist’s deliberate intentions. The absence of descriptive titles – each work is numbered rather than titled – both frustrates and encourages these open interpretations. [Extract : Hiroyuki Hamada Blog]

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Hiroyuki Hamada : Website

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02
Sep
11

Christopher Wool : Silkscreens

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Untitled
Christopher Wool
Silkscreen ink on linen
2009

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Enamel on linen
2010

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Silkscreen ink on paper
2008

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Enamel on linen
2009

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Enamel on linen
2006

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Enamel on linen
2008

Untitled
Christopher Wool
Enamel on linen
2009

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Christopher Wool is best known for his paintings of large, black, stenciled letters on white canvases. However, Wool possesses a wide range of style – using a combined array of painterly techniques, including spray paint, silkscreen, and hand painting. Christopher provides tension between painting and erasing, gesture and removal, depth and flatness. [Extract : Gagosian Gallery]

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Christopher Wool : Luhring Augustine

Christopher Wool : Website

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