Posts Tagged ‘destruction

23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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10
Feb
12

Jai Llewellyn : ‘Inks’ Series (Works on Paper)

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‘What goes up must come down’
Ink & graphite on paper
40 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Immobility’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The calm after the storm’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Hot on your heels’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘The land that time forgot’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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‘Swiftly moving on’
Ink & graphite on paper
30 × 40 cm
2011
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“My work is diverse. Predominantly I work in the field of abstract expressionism. The foundation of my work comes from an intensive study of the ‘nude’ and although the formal representation of the figure has completely vanished from my practice, there is an underlying system or structure that has it’s roots in the abstraction of the human form. I rarely plan or rehearse a piece, working intuitively I allow an image to evolve naturally, to have a life of its own. I am interested in the idea that when something is destroyed another is simultaneously created, as in reincarnation or rebirth. I often use surfaces that have previously been worked on, rather than a blank canvas, I react to existing marks or images. Working in this way produces results that I could not plan for or even imagine, and it is important that the ingredient which attracted me in the first instance is not completely lost but given a new life. Often I leave some of the original elements to pay respect to its contribution.” Jai Llewellyn : Artist Statement

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Jai Llewellyn : Website

Jai Llewellyn : RedBubble

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17
Jan
12

Heidi Leverty : ‘Outbox’ Series (Photography)

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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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“This body of work is about recycled and discarded items that no longer perform the functions for which they were intended. What appears to be without value is in fact a source of inspiration, a bounty of objects d’art. Removed from their first use, these materials of paper, metal, plastic and fabric secrete an unexpected visual richness, the product of chance. My art focuses on items that are part of our daily lives, art that is integrated into the culture and community. My intention is to portray the unique and extraordinary in the seemingly ordinary.

Up close, these mundane and discarded objects become poetic abstractions of strength and emotion. As I see these objects condemned to destruction, I experience the conflict between human classification of uselessness, a sense of loss in wasted function and the unexpected attraction of sublime beauty in overlooked places. Bales of shredded paper, cartons, boxes of varied hues and metal sliced like luncheon meat give way to a collage of life in which we all take part.

Unique and ephemeral works, sculptured forms with an intense beauty, all emerge from piles of rusty metal objects and roll of sheet metal. Their colour markings suggesting comparisons with the splashes of Jackson Pollock. Although these images are abstracts in approach, they are documentary in their representation, and powerful enough to create public awareness and make one reflect on the eventual metamorphosis of these used and unwanted products. Simple objects retired from use in passage from refuse to trash to recycled material.” — Heidi Leverty

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Heidi Leverty : Website

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09
Apr
11

Gerry Judah : 3D Paintings

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

Gerry Judah
Relief Paintings
2011

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Judah’s equal parts ominous and alluring three-dimensional paintings take war and destruction as their subject, giving us in dramatic aerial view. He lovingly builds his unlovable buildings with model-maker’s care only to deconstruct the resulting forlorn, innards-spewing wrecks with equally meticulous destructiveness. The monochrome, painterly alloverness of these architectural funerary portraits is aestheticizing, almost indeed ethereal, despite their ash-strewn sense of doom. And yet Judah’s chromophobia also operates non-metaphorically, sparking stark associations of grainy satellite images. The destruction detailed is remote and visceral, dainty and monumental, abstract and chillingly real.

[Extract : David Cohen, artcritical.com, 25 January 2011]

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Gerry Judah : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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