Posts Tagged ‘objects

05
Dec
12

Jaroslav Rössler : Abstract Photography

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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Komposition mit Apfel’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Ei mit Eiffelturm’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Bez názvu / Untitled’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Bez názvu / Untitled’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Zátiší s uzávěrem’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Surimprese jablka’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler
‘Kompozice s ozubeným kolem’
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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‘Loď’
Jaroslav Rössler
20.5 x 20 cm
photo
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Jaroslav Rössler (1902–1990) was one of the most important Czech avant-garde photographers and his work from the first half of the 1920s ranked amongst the earliest and most radical examples of the application of Abstract and Constructivist principles to photography. Rössler started as an assistant to František Drtikol, but quickly abandoned the pictorial style of his renowned teacher and began to focus on minimalist details of actual objects and on geometric paper cut-outs, abstract compositions with shadow and light, inventive photomontages, and Constructivist shots of modern engineering and architecture. In 1923 he was invited to join Devětsil, and thus became the only photographer in the most famous Czech avant-garde group of artists and writers. During his Paris sojourn, 1927–35, he worked in several important studios, mainly making modern photographs for advertisements, while continuing to experiment freely on his own. Later, after a long hiatus, he returned to experimentation in the mid-1950s, and once again contributed to the latest artistic trends in a truly original way. Extract

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Jaroslav Rössler : Abstract Photography (1923 – 1978)

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26
Aug
12

Mårten Lange : “Anomalies” Series (Photography)

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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“There is an optimal size of things,” Mårten Lange says. Lange believes in the power of the index. When viewed in sequence, his stark, black-and-white photographs of both natural and manmade phenomena resemble a meticulously assembled catalogue of objects whose common quality remains tantalizingly obscure, despite the undeniable sense that they are, somehow, related. Lange’s work underscores photography’s empiricism, its liberation from the subjectivity of other media. In his work, form is stripped of meaning and allowed to stand unadorned, ready for contemplation. Lange explains, “You’ve got this lens, which sees everything, but it understands nothing.” Perhaps his best-known work is Anomalies, his third self-published book. The format of the photos in Anomalies is very strict: all the images are squares (that most static and inert shape) with an object centered in the composition…

Shot in Sweden and Japan, the images in Anomalies are deliberately de-contextualized. Lange notes. “It’s not about a place. If you leave the place out of the story, the images can take on different weights. Places are really loud.” The objects that populate Anomalies, on the other hand, are suffused with a deep, seemingly impenetrable silence. Lange photographed most of the images in Anomalies with a medium format camera equipped with a large Metz flash that he hoped would help combat the inky darkness of the long Swedish winter. It had an even more powerful effect, he recalls. “The whole town became my studio,” he says. In many of the images in Anomalies, the harsh blanket of light effectively cleaves figure from ground, and a scalelessness pervades. An overturned bus, an origami crane, and a distant house could all be the same size, and all resonate with an uncanny strangeness…

Lange’s early interest in photography had more to do with the equipment than the images it could yield. “I was fixated on the machine,” he recalls. As a boy, he visited his grandfather, who had a darkroom in his basement. Lange took photographs of small birds amid the Swedish landscape using his grandfather’s telephoto lens. Traces of those early experiments remain in his current work, which resonates with the power of a focal object emerging from a scanned void. “Complexity resembles chaos,” Lange notes, adding, “Like reverse science, I’m creating the kind of evidence I need to prove my point.” Anomalies has in fact been compared to Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan’s seminal Evidence (1977), which similarly strips the context from the images it indexes. – [Extract : The Last Magazine #8]

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Mårten Lange : Website

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25
Apr
12

George Ramms : ‘Long Exposures’ Series (Photography)

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‘My passion is to capture the world around us in a way that reduces the object to its true appearance, with photographs of ordinary subjects enhanced by lines, contrasts and light, or absence of it.’ ~ G.R

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‘Diving Platform’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Swiss Lake’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Before Season’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Fish Trap’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Venice Morning’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Viewing Balcony’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Baywatch Tower’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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By using long exposures, George Ramms directs the viewers attention to the still object of the picture. Things and places that are not obvious, or even mostly ignored to be photographed, unveil their beauty in monochrome pictures with a smooth skin of light. Jetties, stones and rocks stand out among the constantly moving environment and disclose a powerful silence. [ Extract : George Ramms – About ]

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George Ramms : Website

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23
Apr
12

Azurebumble : ‘AI : Series’ (Photography Book)

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Recently, I’ve curated a number of image series by photographers from ‘Flickr’ on my blog ‘Aesthetic Investigations’. Subsequently, I thought it would be interesting to document these works in a book. Therefore, i’ve arranged a collection of ’39’ abstract and minimal photographic series by these ’32’ artists. A selection of pages from the book can be viewed below, a full book preview can be seen: HERE

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Thank you to everyone who contributed their images to this project.

All graphic content and curations by : Alan Wilson ( azurebumble )

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Book Cover
Front & Back Pages
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Introductory Pages
Copyright & Contents
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Introductory Pages
Tags, Artists & Series Thumbnails
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Photography Series
Gianni Galassi
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Photography Series
Teresa (Colourful Life) & roB_meL
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Photography Series
Camilo Todemann & Olli Kekäläinen
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Photography Series
Brancolina & Barbara Stumm
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Photography Series
Françoise Lucas & Leonie Polah
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Photography Series
Julian Gomez & Tom Mclaughlan
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Artists

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Alec Cheer……………………Annemie Hiele……………………..Azurebumble……………………Barbara Stumm

Brancolina………………….Camilo Todemann…………………..Daniel Molina…………………….Fernandoprats

Françoise Lucas…………….Gianni Galassi…………………….James Withey……………….John Kosmopoulos

Julian Gomez……………Krystina Stimakovits…………………Leonie Polah………………………….Lillykeeper

Lord Jezzer…………………..Lucie Bourassa…………………..Mark Valentine…………………..Olli Kekäläinen

Peter Moons…………………..Phédia Mazuc……………………..Rita Vita Finzi…………………………….roB_meL

Shari Baker……………………Steffen Tuck………………..Teresa (Colourful life)…………..Tom McLaughlan

Visualisarium…………………..Wilma Eras……………………Wouter Hogendorp……………………….Zel Nunes

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VIEW FULL BOOK PREVIEW AND PURCHASE HERE

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01
Mar
12

Yoonjin Jung : ‘Seeing the Unseen’ Series (Mixed Media)

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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2011
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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‘seeing the unseen’
mixed media
2010
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The main theme of Yoonjin’s work is ‘Seeing the Unseen’ which has been inspired by the emptiness in oriental painting. Her work explores the meaning of the empty space in oriental painting and the definition of invisibility in relation to the space. In fact some parts of her work seem unused. Yet they have been planned with as much care as the objects. What she wants to do in her work is to help the viewer to see the unseen and sense the invisible through both invisibility and visibility. Then the viewer is stimulated between the boundary of the invisibility and the visibility. – Yoonjin Jung : Artist Statement

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Yoonjin Jung : Website

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18
Feb
12

Anil Akkus : ‘Still Life’ Series (Photography)

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‘White Fruits’
Photograph
Still life
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‘Water Lily’
Photograph
Still life
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‘Razor’
Photograph
Still life
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‘Peeler’
Photograph
Still life
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‘Spoon II’
Photograph
Still life
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‘Not So Knife’
Photograph
Still life
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Anil specialises in still life and conceptual photography. In the studio his work revolves around playing with light and objects, where he uses ordinary day to day items and tries to reveal an unusual aspect…

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Anil Akkus : More Works

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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