Posts Tagged ‘wood

23
Aug
12

antonia low : “gewicht des sehens” installation (on paper)

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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
::

::
“gewicht des sehens”
20 x 29 cm
C-print
2012
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The exhibition pavillion designed by the Irish artist Stephen Craig is set inside an old factory building. The floor of the pavillion is covered entirely with mirror glass and a black spray-painted scaffolding is installed on top of the fragile surface. The modernistic architecture of the building, which refers to Mies van de Rohe‘s pavillion, is reflected in the floor. The visitiors can see themselves, the space from the top of the scaffolding structure and observe the entire space in a completely different way. But through the installation and with each movement of the spectators the weight of the structure cause a continous destruction of the mirror surface. A few scaffolding elements are even thrown over onto the cracking glass while other elements remain either partly constructed or partly deconstructed in the space. Seeing their own reflections the spectators become aware of themselves, they see the caused damage and realise that the perfection was gone instantly, or had never even been achieved. [Extract]

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Antonia Low : Website

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09
Feb
12

Michael Zelehoski : Mixed Media Assemblages (Artwork)

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“Each epoch always has and always needs its oppositions of destruction and construction.” Mondrian

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‘Burned Pallet’
Assemblage
50 x 50″
2011
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‘Box’
Assemblage
22 x 27″
2008
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‘Burned Pallet’
Assemblage
Detail
2011
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‘Folding Chairs’
Assemblage
24 x 37″
2009
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‘Human Lobster Trap’
Assemblage
63 x 93″
2009
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‘Folding Chairs’
Assemblage
28 x 41″
2008
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My recent work involves the literal collapse of three-dimensional objects and structures into the picture plane. This simple gesture – which is basically just taking things apart and putting them back together flat – is at the heart of what we think of as two-dimensional, representational art. I’m just doing it in a very literal way and whereas the whole point of Magritte’s pipe was that it wasn’t. The whole point of these objects is that they are what they are.

I work almost exclusively with found, utilitarian objects such as shipping pallets and boxes. I deconstruct the objects, cutting them into sometimes hundreds of abstract fragments before reassembling the pieces two-dimensionally. The negative space is filled with carefully fitted pieces of wood, creating a solid plane in which the object is trapped in a parody of its former perspective. The object’s concreteness is in direct contrast to the spatial illusionism of its composition not to mention the perceived autonomy of the picture plane.

By unifying the picture plane and the spatial environment, I’m trying to reconcile the dichotomy between pictorial and physical space, art and object, sculpture and painting. Sculpture has been defined as a three-dimensional object in space. These are three-dimensional objects in two-dimensional space and although they find themselves trapped, unable to perform their original functions, they remain active and productive on the level of our experience. These objects, which have always been thought of as means to other ends, have become ends in themselves. – Artist Statement

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Michael Zelehoski : Website

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07
Feb
12

Gregory Whyte : ‘Tryptophan Haze’ Series (Sculptures)

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‘Sculpture’
Wood, pigment, wax
Gregory Whyte
2010
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‘Sculpture’
Wood, pigment, wax
Gregory Whyte
2010
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‘Sculpture’
Wood, pigment, wax
Gregory Whyte
2010
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‘Sculpture’
Wood, pigment, wax
Gregory Whyte
2010
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Wall Street research analyst turned sculptor.

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Gregory Whyte : Website

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06
Oct
11

Hiroyuki Hamada : Sculpture

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#32
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 36 x 1.75 in
1998 – 2001

#64
hiroyuki hamada
28.5 x 4.5 in
1997 – 1998

#45
hiroyuki hamada
20 x 25 x 25 in
2002 – 2005

#37
hiroyuki hamada
36 x 12 in
1998 – 2002

#46
hiroyuki hamada
34 x 11 in
2003 – 2005

#53
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 14.5 in
2005 – 2008

#55
hiroyuki hamada
44 x 24 x 12.5 in
2005 – 2008

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Hiroyuki Hamada received his initial training as a painter and as such, the integration of form and surface are paramount to his process. He begins each sculpture by making a foam and wood core, builds it up with burlap and plaster, and finally applies a combination of enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, and wax to create an austere and mysterious finish.

His underlying forms imply a deep connection with the geometry of nature, but they remain non-representational. Basic shapes such as the circle, ellipse, and square are gently stretched and torqued under his hand. Hamada favors a limited palette, but he nonetheless conveys myriad ideas, objects, and emotional tones. It is perhaps one’s inability to “place” each work that makes it so richly allusive.

Indeed, Hamada’s sculpture may connote an archeological relic, a futuristic spaceship, or the microscopic worlds of cells and molecules, but these are the viewer’s personal speculations, not the artist’s deliberate intentions. The absence of descriptive titles – each work is numbered rather than titled – both frustrates and encourages these open interpretations. [Extract : Hiroyuki Hamada Blog]

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Hiroyuki Hamada : Website

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01
Nov
10

Mayumi Terada : ‘Dollhouses’ (Photography)

‘Window with Trees and Cup’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2006

Skylight and Ladder
gelatin silver print
54.5 x 40 inches
2005

Eggs on Glass table
gelatin silver print
20 x 24 inches
2007

‘View of Blossoms from Basement’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2008

‘Rocking Chair and Window’
gelatin silver print
40.5 x 55 inches
2005

‘View of Moon and Bottle ‘
gelatin silver print
20 x 24 inches
2007

There is a feeling of distinct absence about these spaces, a lingering absence, an intentional view of a reality that once existed, but has since disappeared. Terada’s photographs defer any rational sense of scale, lending a peculiar, less than ordinary, perspective to the rooms and an uncanny sense of proportion. Her practice is a composite of self-taught techniques that belong equally to sculpture, painting, architecture, and photography. Together they work to express a profound tension of time and space, emitting a mystery that purposely eludes our sensory perception. Terada constructs her dollhouse rooms from foam-core, cardboard, and wood, with tiny furnishings cut and glued from paper, fabrics, plastic, and metals. The end result is not these intimate constructions in themselves, but the black-and-white photograph that Terada makes of it, using only natural light. Like childhood doll’s play, Terada’s miniature sanctuaries are contemplative reflections that refer both directly and indirectly to the body. The conceptual aspect of her work oscillates between the virtual and tactile realities that underpin contemporary life. What is curious about these photographs is the extent to which their visual tensions depend on the coordination of hand and eye. [Extract : ‘Mayumi Terada’ by Robert C. Morgan]

Mayumi Terada : Robert Miller Gallery

Mayumi Terada : James Hyman Gallery

06
Sep
10

Milan Klic : Sculpture (vehicles series)

Shelter
52″ x 73″ x 25″
Bamboo, Thread
2005

Dogma
83″ x 49″ x 69″
Bamboo
2004

Habitat
67″ x 93″ x 29″
Bamboo, Thread
2005

Opium War
71″ x 88″ x 29″
Bamboo, Thread
2007

Mission #2
89″ x 98″ x 23″
Bamboo, Thread
2004

Mission
67″ x 79″ x 17″
Bamboo, Thread, Wood
2003

“The theme of wheel, vehicle, to me the most mysterious and intriguing of human contraptions, and spiritual entanglements associated with it, offer intrinsic metaphor of existence. Dreamlike constructs, primitive and frail in their execution and use of organic materials, they refer back to the origins of travel and to the dominance of automobiles in contemporary society. In their fragility they express the psychological toll we pay for living in a world which at every moment seems to be obsessed with relentless mobility. In composition they seem to many viewers like spatial drawings, reduced to bare essentials and bizarre in their non-functionality, as if time and motion were suspended from within their very essence.” Milan Klic

Milan Klic : Website




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