Posts Tagged ‘resin

16
Aug
12

U-Ram Choe : ‘Custos Cavum’ (Sculpture Video)

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Custos Cavum, 2011
size : 220(h) x 360(w) x 260(d)cm
material : metallic material, resin, motor, gear, custom CPU board, LED

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Once upon a time, there were two worlds. Each connected to the other through a number of small holes, as if the worlds were breathing through these holes. However, the holes had a tendency to close up, so there were guardians next to each one to keep them open. The guardians were called “Custos Cavum.” They took the form of seals and had large front teeth, which they used to gnaw the holes to prevent them from closing up. Whenever a Custos Cavum felt the generation of a new hole somewhere, it fell into a deep sleep. From the body of the quietly sleeping Custos Cavum grew winged spores called “Unicuses.” These spores took flight and each flew to a new hole, giving rise to a new Custos Cavum. As time went on, the people of each world forgot about the other. The guardians lost their power and died. When the last Custos Cavum died, the last hole closed, separating the two worlds completely. The existence of the other world was entirely erased from people’s memories. – [X]

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U-Ram Choe : Website

U-Ram Choe : Vimeo

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06
Oct
11

Hiroyuki Hamada : Sculpture

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#32
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 36 x 1.75 in
1998 – 2001

#64
hiroyuki hamada
28.5 x 4.5 in
1997 – 1998

#45
hiroyuki hamada
20 x 25 x 25 in
2002 – 2005

#37
hiroyuki hamada
36 x 12 in
1998 – 2002

#46
hiroyuki hamada
34 x 11 in
2003 – 2005

#53
hiroyuki hamada
38 x 14.5 in
2005 – 2008

#55
hiroyuki hamada
44 x 24 x 12.5 in
2005 – 2008

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Hiroyuki Hamada received his initial training as a painter and as such, the integration of form and surface are paramount to his process. He begins each sculpture by making a foam and wood core, builds it up with burlap and plaster, and finally applies a combination of enamel, oil, plaster, resin, tar, and wax to create an austere and mysterious finish.

His underlying forms imply a deep connection with the geometry of nature, but they remain non-representational. Basic shapes such as the circle, ellipse, and square are gently stretched and torqued under his hand. Hamada favors a limited palette, but he nonetheless conveys myriad ideas, objects, and emotional tones. It is perhaps one’s inability to “place” each work that makes it so richly allusive.

Indeed, Hamada’s sculpture may connote an archeological relic, a futuristic spaceship, or the microscopic worlds of cells and molecules, but these are the viewer’s personal speculations, not the artist’s deliberate intentions. The absence of descriptive titles – each work is numbered rather than titled – both frustrates and encourages these open interpretations. [Extract : Hiroyuki Hamada Blog]

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Hiroyuki Hamada : Website

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11
Sep
11

Rachel Whiteread : Sculpture

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‘Untitled (Rubber Torso)’
High Density Rubber
3 1/2 x 7 1/8 x 10 3/8 in
1994

‘Index’
Plaster (two units)
10 5/8 x 11 5/8 x 10 1/4 in
2005

‘Hold’
Plaster, wood and aluminum
9 1/4 x 23 5/8 x 9 7/8 in
2005

‘Cabinet II’
Metal and plaster (one metal cupboard and 43 plaster units)
17 3/4 x 18 1/2 x 17 1/2 in
2006

‘Study’
Plaster and wood
36 x 73 5/8 x 21 1/4 in
2005

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The artist Rachel Whiteread creates elegant and poetic sculptures which explore architecture, space, absence and memory. Often inspired by the physicality of the human body, her works are poignant for their exploration of intimate domestic spaces and household objects. Whiteread typically uses industrial materials such as plaster, resin and rubber to cast the negative space surrounding or within an object – the murky darkness beneath a bed frame, the void within a humble cardboard box, the space in and around a myriad collection of books. The resulting sculptures retain the texture and shape of the original objects, yet are eerie ghosts of their former selves.

Whiteread is perhaps best known for several large-scale public commissions such as House, a sculpture cast from the interior of a condemned Victorian house in London’ s East End, Water Tower, a resin cast of the water towers ubiquitous to the New York City skyline, Monument, an inverted pedestal placed upon an empty plinth in Trafalgar Square and the Holocaust Memorial in Vienna, an impenetrable library of books turned inwards in commemoration of the thousands of Austrian Jews who perished during World War II. Like her smaller sculptures, these monumental works are distinguished by their minimalist sensibility and their capacity to evoke stillness and contemplation.

Rachel Whiteread has a long list of international distinctions which include winning the 1993 Turner Prize for House, representing Great Britain in the 1997 Venice Biennale and presenting solo exhibitions at such prestigious institutions as the Kunsthalle Basel, the Reina Sofia, The Serpentine Gallery and the Deutsche Guggenheim. Her work is housed in museums and private collections around the world, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York, the Stedelijk van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, the Tate Modern, London and the Centre Pompidou, Paris. The artist lives and works in London, England. [Bio]

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Rachel Whiteread : Luhring Augustine

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22
Aug
10

Do Ho Suh : Home Within A Home

Commissioned by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Museum of Fine Arts Houston,
Resin for the exhibition Your Bright Future: 12 Contemporary Artists from Korea

Do Ho Suh
Home Within a Home
2009

Do Ho Suh
Home Within a Home
2009

Do Ho Suh
Home Within a Home
2009

Do Ho Suh
Home Within a Home (detail)
2009

Do Ho Suh
Home Within a Home
2009

‘Home Within a Home’ is literally a house within a house. Within his current apartment building, when looked at up close, we see that inside the complex is the “Traditional” Korean home he grew up in. This tells us no matter where he lives he will always have those roots embedded inside him. They will always be there to remind him of his humble beginnings. When looking at this composition, it is amazing to see the complex and intricate detail the artist went through to portray such a moving and life altering portion of his life. It takes a lot of guts to put oneself out there and to bare ones inner most workings to give us a glimpse of what it is like to assimilate from one culture to the next.

[extract : Museum of Fine Arts, Houston]

Do Ho Suh : Lehmann Maupin Gallery

Do Ho Suh : Blueprint(designboom)

07
Jul
10

Eva Hesse : Artist

“Confidence in my understanding of formal aesthetics is not the problem.
Those things are solvable. I solved them beautifully”. (Eva Hesse)

H + H
1965 (June)
Varnish, ink, gouache, enamel, cord, metal, wood, papier-câché,
unknown modeling compound, particle board, wood

Oomamaboomba
1965 (May)
Tempera, enamel, rope, cord, metal,
unknown modeling compound, particle board, wood

Sans II (One Unit)
October 1968
Fiberglass and polyester resin

Aught
1968
Latex, canvas, polyethylene sheeting, rope and unidentified materials; metal grommets
Installation variable, 4 units

Contingent
November 1969
Fiberglass, polyester resin, latex, cheesecloth

Right After
1969
Fiberglass, polyester resin, wire

Expanded Expansion
1969
Reinforced fiberglass poles and rubberized cheesecloth.

Eva Hesse was one of the great artists of the 1960s, and her major sculptural works stand out as singular achievements of that era. At once drawing on Minimalist strategies of repetition and seriality, and pushing non-traditional materials toward new modes of expression, Hesse created an art that evoked emotion, absence, and contingency. [Extract : The Jewish Museum]

The Estate Of Eva Hesse




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