Posts Tagged ‘China

25
Jul
12

Yasuhiro Ogawa : Photography Series

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“Tokyo is noisy, chaotic, but full of a strange silence” – Yasuhiro Ogawa

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“Train for Heihe, China”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“On a Commuter Train”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“Train for Qiqihar”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“Ferryboat Window, Hokkaido”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2009
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“Ferryboat Terminal”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2008
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“Hotel Window, Hokkaido”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2009
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“TV Monitor in a Park”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“On the Ferryboat”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“Under the Railway Bridge”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“Funeral, Aoyama”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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Born in 1968, Kanagawa, Japan. Started to take pictures at the age of 24, influenced by the work of Sebastiao Salgado. The first exhibition titled “Futashika-na-Chizu” was held at Ginza Kodak Photo-salon, Tokyo, in 1999. Since then, his work has appeared in many publications in Japan. This year Ogawa won the prestigious Newcomer’s Award from the Photographic Society of Japan for his Slowly Down the River work, from which a couple of these come. The work centers around the construction of the Three Gorges Dam in China, and the profound changes wrought by this massive development. Book

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Yasuhiro Ogawa : Website

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13
Mar
12

Fan Ho : ‘Hong Kong Yesterday’ Series (Photography)

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‘Approaching Shadow’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Pattern’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘People Crossing’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Afternoon Chat’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘The Lonely Conductor’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Lonely Stroll’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Inferno’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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Born in Shanghai, China in 1932, Fan Ho later moved to Hong Kong with his family, where he began to take photographs using a Rolleiflex camera given to him by his father. In the beginning, Fan Ho considered photography an engaging pastime. But as he roamed the streets and alleyways of Hong Kong, he was drawn to the city and its inhabitants. Whether it’s the slums of Hong Kong, its pulsing city streets, or its light-filled stairwells, the patterns of daily life are the inspiration for his still photographs.

Inspired by the Bauhaus point of view and a strong sense of abstraction, Fan Ho’s cosmopolitan, multicultural Hong Kong becomes a magical city of light and dark, shadow and substance, crowds and isolation. The experimental nature of Fan Ho’s vision is immediately apparent in these photographs, which are notable not only for their altered perspectives, dramatic compositions and surreal abstraction, but also for the view they provide of the markets, streets and slums of Hong Kong. – [Ext]

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Fan Ho : Modernbook

Fan Ho : More Works

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03
Dec
11

Qin YongJun : Photography

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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun
Photograph
2011
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Qin YongJun : Fotoblur

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22
Nov
10

Tan Ping : Etchings

“My works have a strong narrative component; I am reluctant to call them abstract art. Traditional abstract art has emphasised the meaning of dot-line paintings, colour, composition, and the value of negative space. Whenever I paint a painting, there is a strong narrative, but this narrative could be perceived by others as a feeling. Without this emotion, my works would indeed be spiritless.” Tan Ping

‘Untitled’
Etching
42 x 86 cm
2001

‘Untitled’
Etching
42 x 61 cm
2001

‘Untitled’
Etching
43 x 88 cm
2000

‘Untitled’
Etching
41 x 81 cm
1999

‘Untitled’
Etching
41 x 81 cm
1999

Tan Ping has developed his personal idiom in his introspective abstract painting and woodblock prints. His gestural style recalls the experiments of some of the Abstract Expressionists, but he is not heir to their pompous grandiosity. Tan gives us his enigmatic imagery in a format that invites us to consider it and is careful not to overwhelm his viewer. He also does not insist on two-dimensional reading of his canvas and notes that a viewer’s perception of depth in his work is purely personal and psychological. His recent work demonstrates his experimentation with a more diversified palette. These painterly oases on his monochromatic compositions are successful in balancing intense visual interest with the restrained sobriety that gives his canvases their mystical quality. [Extract : by Tally Beck]

Tan Ping : Red Gate Gallery

Tan Ping : Studio Rouge

30
Oct
10

Zhou Jun : The Red and the Black

Zhengyangmen, Beijing
Digital C – print
120 x 150 cm
2006

Daqianmen, Beijing
Digital C – print
120 x 150 cm
2006

Sanyuanqiao, Beijing
Digital C – print
120 x 150 cm
2006

Forbidden City #1, Beijing
Digital C – print
120 x 150 cm
2006

Scaffolding Series #2, Tianjin
Digital C – print
150 x 120 cm
2007

Dongzhimen, Beijing
Digital C – print
120 x 150 cm
2006

“The three decades of development China is experiencing – building to a crescendo with the Olympics – are unparalleled in history. The colour red, which I use to highlight specific parts of the photograph, can elicit different responses in people from different countries or cultures – at times, it can even have opposite meanings for people. I want my work to be interpreted differently by people depending on their response to the symbolic meaning of red. In this sense, the work has the potential to reveal international perspectives to common subject matter.” Zhou Jun

Zhou Jun : Red Gate Gallery

Zhou Jun : Galerie Paris-Beijing

Essay : City and Construction: The Works of Zhou Jun by Zhang Zhaohui

18
Sep
10

Robert Rauschenberg : Prints (The Lotus Series)

Lotus V (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus I (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus III (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus II (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus VI (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus IX (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

When we are looking at The Lotus Series, like most of Rauschenberg’s work, we never see a photograph in isolation. Even though he was an excellent photographer, at some level he must have felt that a single image would not be real enough, unable to convey all of the life and energy that he saw spinning around him. The single image was too fixed, too stable, too much about one-point perspective. By contrast, he wanted to convey what it felt like to be alive. He was not trying to make art with the prints, but he was trying to show you the art that surrounds us everyday. Almost anything can be art; you just have to look at it in a certain way. In an uncanny way, he had the incredible ability to find Combines no matter where he went. Early on in his career he made them himself, later he just took photographs when he encountered them during his travels. Rauschenberg was opening himself to the world around him, trying to be open to the potential for art latent in his every experience.

The new prints seem to be less about objects being photographed and transferred to a print, but more about the raw experience of a place. The original negatives from his trip to China (1983-85) were destroyed in a hurricane. Fortunately, small prints were discovered that would become the source images for these large-scale prints of The Lotus Series. These images were scanned by Bill Goldston who was able to enlarge the images and correct the color. The next step was to print out the source images in different sizes so that Rauschenberg would be able to arrange the images for the final prints. The enlarged photos of his trip to China were made with an ink that allows the image to be transferred to another piece of paper by use of a solvent. This process eventually created an original, which was scanned and reproduced for the final prints. For me, this is a critical part of the Rauschenberg’s process; the photographs were the starting point, not the end point. [Extract : Portland Art]

The Lotus Series : Larissa Goldston Gallery

Robert Rauschenberg : Greenfield Sacks Gallery




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