Posts Tagged ‘isolation

17
Jul
12

Jacob Aue Sobol : “I Tokyo” Series (Photography)

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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“Bangkok Encounter” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“Bangkok Encounter” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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“I, Tokyo” Series
Jacob Aue Sobol
Photograph
2008
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Photographs from the series I, Tokyo were taken between 2006 and 2008 while the artist lived in Tokyo. Overwhelmed by loneliness and isolation due to the unfamiliar culture and large city, the artist used the camera to find “individual human presence” in a swarming metropolis. The photographs offer a personal view of Tokyo, a result of the artist’s need to connect to the people and the city. – Yossi Milo

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Jacob Aue Sobol : Website

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16
Jul
12

Martin Usborne : “MUTE: the silence of dogs in cars” Series

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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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I was once left in a car at a young age. I don’t know when or where or for how long, possibly at the age of four, perhaps outside Tesco’s, probably for fifteen minutes only. The details don’t matter. The point is that I wondered if anyone would come back. It seems trivial now but in a child’s mind it is possible to be alone forever. Around the same age I began to feel a deep affinity with animals – in particular their plight at the hands of humans. I remember watching television and seeing footage of a dog being put in a plastic bag and being kicked. What appalled me most was that the dog could not speak back. It’s muteness absolutely terrified me. I should say that I was a well-loved child and never abandoned and yet it is quite clear that both these experiences arose from the same place deep inside me: a fear of being alone and unheard. Perhaps this is a fear we all share on some level, I am not sure.

The images in this series explore that feeling, both in relation to myself and to animals in general. The camera is the perfect tool for capturing a sense of silence and longing: the shutter freezes the subject for ever and two layers of glass are placed between the viewer and the viewed: the glass of the lens, the glass of the picture frame and, in this instance, the glass of the car window further isolates the animal. The dog is truly trapped. When I started this project I knew the photos would be dark. What I didn’t expect was to see so many subtle reactions by the dogs: some sad, some expectant, some angry, some dejected. It was as if upon opening up a box of grey-coloured pencils I was surprised to see so many shades inside. I hope that these pictures are engaging and perhaps a little amusing. I want to show that there is life in the dark places within us. I will stop writing now and you can stop reading. Words can only get us so far. After all, we are all animals. – Martin Usborne, September, 2010.

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Martin Usborne : Website

The Making of ‘Dogs in Cars’ : Vimeo

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29
Mar
12

Ikko Narahara : Photography

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One of the co-founders of the legendary photo agency VIVO ( Shomei Tomatsu, Eikoh Hosoe, Kikuji Kawada, and others ), which was to be the epicenter for a new generation of Japanese photographers.

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‘Hibiya’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1959
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‘Aoyama’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Shinjuku’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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Dress: Hanae Mori, Model: Hiroko Matsumoto
from the series: ‘Fashion’
silver print
1968
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‘Yurakucho’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Engraved arrow, Arizona’
‘Where Time Has Vanished’ Series
silver print
1972
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‘Shimbashi’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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In his early work Narahara focused on people who were living in isolation from the everyday world, such as monks in a Trappist monastery or the inmates of a women’s prison. His work aimed at creating a ‘personal document’, he aspired to ‘a process of laying bare the inner form by thoroughly depicting the exterior’ (Ikko Narahara). Walking a tightrope between description and abstraction, objectivity and a personal narrative, Narahara transcended the journalistic documentary photography then prevalent in Japan. Furthermore, Narahara displayed a particular facility for abstraction and the staging of everyday scenes in strict graphic compositions as in, for example, the series ‘Tokyo, the ‘50s’…

At the beginning of the 1970s Narahara went to the USA. This was the location of his best-known series ‘Where Time Has Vanished’. During extensive trips across the country he photographed the mythic sites of the American Dream, vast landscapes, Indian reservations, automobiles, motels and casinos. In contrast to fellow photographers Gary Winogrand and Robert Adams, Ikko didn’t take a critical approach to the American scene. Ikko Narahara’s work is primarily poetic with surreal elements

‘As I drove across the land in Arizona and Utah and New Mexico, I began to have hallucinations that this was not the earth at all and that I had been thrown onto some other planet…’  ~ (Ikko Narahara)

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Ikko Narahara : Galerie Priska

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13
Mar
12

Fan Ho : ‘Hong Kong Yesterday’ Series (Photography)

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‘Approaching Shadow’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Pattern’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘People Crossing’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Afternoon Chat’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘The Lonely Conductor’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Lonely Stroll’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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‘Inferno’
Photograph
Fan Ho
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Born in Shanghai, China in 1932, Fan Ho later moved to Hong Kong with his family, where he began to take photographs using a Rolleiflex camera given to him by his father. In the beginning, Fan Ho considered photography an engaging pastime. But as he roamed the streets and alleyways of Hong Kong, he was drawn to the city and its inhabitants. Whether it’s the slums of Hong Kong, its pulsing city streets, or its light-filled stairwells, the patterns of daily life are the inspiration for his still photographs.

Inspired by the Bauhaus point of view and a strong sense of abstraction, Fan Ho’s cosmopolitan, multicultural Hong Kong becomes a magical city of light and dark, shadow and substance, crowds and isolation. The experimental nature of Fan Ho’s vision is immediately apparent in these photographs, which are notable not only for their altered perspectives, dramatic compositions and surreal abstraction, but also for the view they provide of the markets, streets and slums of Hong Kong. – [Ext]

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Fan Ho : Modernbook

Fan Ho : More Works

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10
Jan
12

Hiro Yamagata : ‘Transient’ Series (Mixed Media)

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This new series, Transient, is a tour de force that celebrates the cosmic dance between tectonic forces and frail temporal overlays in a dizzying and cinematic symphony of monotones. This series ensures this kaleidoscopic artist will maintain his place at the forefront of the visual avant garde. [Ex – Bill Lowe]

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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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‘Transient’ Series
Hiro Yamagata
Mixed Media
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Japanese-American artist Hiro Yamagata marks a dramatic shift in aesthetic in his new series titled Transient. Known through the eighties and nineties as a master of Pop spectacle, Yamagata transforms his passion for dialogue between macrocosmic and microcosmic considerations into a distinctly new pictorial domain. The result is a profoundly introspective examination of the collective and individual psychic template. This interface is depicted in hauntingly beautiful works done in black and white on hand-made rice paper attached to canvas. Often monumental in scale, these works convey a sense of timelessness and impart an isolation that is both compelling and forbidding. This series speaks to the issue of time, place and perspective while its elements insinuate an unfolding apocalyptic splendor which lies just beneath or above our dimension. A global force in contemporary art for over thirty years, Yamagata stakes a claim in new philosophical terrain with this historic series of somber abstractions. The work calls upon his rich heritage and imbues it with his visionary grasp of the metaphysical and the spiritual. He couples this with an exacting mastery of technique and media to great theatrical effect. BL

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Hiro Yamagata : Website

Hiro Yamagata : Bill Lowe Gallery

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07
Jan
12

Kristina Lerner : ‘Isolation’ Series (Photography)

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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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Any series – are, in one way or another, the reflection of the author’s personal experience. For the past couple of months I very rarely left the house, when I did it was only at night when I went to work or in case of an urgent matter. I did not answer the phone and rarely checked my e-mails. Most of the time was spent attempting to answer the questions which had accumulated over the past years.

Everything surrounding us today is progressively becoming faster; gaining momentum with each day the superfluous amount of information is becoming more unbearable to withhold; it forces a man to retreat inside, to close off, to seek confinement within himself as a kind of temporary relief — a Psychological Isolation, if you may.

In creating these series I first and foremost aspired to capture and to convey the moment of internal displacement, its separation in two spheres — the objective and the subjective. Submerged in isolation, be it only a temporary or even a deliberate one, the human mind begins to operate in a seesaw-like motion; the consciousness shifts from objective reality to internal images: associations and memories. As if rummaging through an old archive, the mind drifts from the present moment to projections of the found memories and the feelings associated with them and then back again and so forth. [Ex Isolation]

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Kristina Lerner : Website

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