Posts Tagged ‘documentary

10
Jul
13

Henry Wessel :: ‘New Topographics’ (Photography)

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“You’re suddenly seeing the coherence and interconnectedness of everything, left to right, bottom to top, front to back. It’s all connected, and somehow, it’s all in balance. And that’s, when you go ‘Yes!’” H Wessel

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artwork_images_168878_675461_henry-wessel

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‘Waikiki No. 9’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1979
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jhddg

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‘Incidents No. 16’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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artwork_images_138625_267827_henry-wessel

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‘Pismo Beach, CA’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1974
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HWE.049_email

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‘Berkeley, California’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1971
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1276634365

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‘Hollywood, California’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1972
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13_new-mexico-iii

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‘New Mexico III’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1969
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tumblr_mgbnfmJu5r1qex654o1_1280

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‘Tucson, Arizona’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1976
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khggg

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‘Incidents No. 8’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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gghk

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‘Incidents No. 6’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
16 × 20 in
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HWE.045_email

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‘New Mexico’
silver gelatin print
Henry Wessel
1968
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Henry Wessel first gained recognition in the 1970s as part of the New Topographics, a group of photographers who challenged the conventions of documentary and landscape photography, capturing instead the poetry of seemingly mundane scenes and subjects—traffic lights, advertisements, empty landscapes, and suburbia. During the 1970s he moved to San Francisco from New York after falling in love with the brilliant quality of light in California. There, in both black-and-white and color film, he photographed the vernacular architecture and social landscape of his surroundings, in prints with long shadows and rich tonal variations… [Extract]

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gallery focus21

pace/macgill gallery

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17
Sep
12

Ryuji Miyamoto : “Cardboard Houses” Series (Photography)

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“All I can do is train my eyes and keep watching the world
as it goes on changing, scene after scene, again and again.”

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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Yokohama’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1996
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Osaka’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘London’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1995
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‘Tokyo’
silver-gelatin print
16 x 20 in
1994
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Ryuji Miyamoto’s series of photographs called ‘Cardboard Houses’ depicts the living spaces created by the city’s organized homeless. The project began in the late 1980s but came to full fruition in the mid-1990s, just as Japan suffered from an economic crisis and the homeless population of Tokyo grew rapidly. Miyamoto is mainly known as an architectural photographer which might explain why he concentrated on the structures created by the organized homeless, rather then the homeless themselves. His cardboard houses are a typology of structures reminiscent of the ‘Water Towers’ by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Even his choice of black and white film, plate camera and silver gelatin printing techniques are an homage to the New Objectivity propagated by the Bechers. The view is supposed to be detached, objective, straight, uncompromising and cold. The images are meant to be documents that might inform the viewer on the cardboard chosen for the shacks or where the shacks have been built. Ryuji observed that the houses are predominantly located in the cracks that the megalopolis Tokyo supplies in abundance. While Becher’s water towers are fully exposed to light, space and the lens of the camera, Ryuji’s cardboard houses are usually next to, under or in between structures. [VCB]

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Ryuji Miyamoto : Michael Hoppen Gallery

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29
Jul
12

Christopher Anderson : “Capitolio” Series (Photography)

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“Emotion or feeling is really the only thing about pictures I find
interesting. Beyond that it is just a trick.” Christopher Anderson

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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2005
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2006
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2005
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2006
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“Venezuela, Caracas”
Christopher Anderson
‘Capitolio’ Series
2004
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Capitolio is documentary photographer Christopher Anderson’s cinematic journey through the upheavals of contemporary Caracas, Venezuela, in the tradition of such earlier projects as William Klein’s New York (1954–55) and Robert Frank’s The Americans (1958). It presents a poetic and politicized vision, by one of todays finest documentary photographers, of a city and a country that is ripping apart at the seams under the stress of popular unrest, and whose turmoil remains largely unreported by Western media. No stranger to such fraught situations (he covered the 2006 conflict between Hezbollah and Israel from its inception), he notates the country’s current incongruities, where the violent and the sensual intermingle chaotically. “The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government,” he writes, elaborating on the title of this volume; “here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. Decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Chavez called a ‘revolution.'” X

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Christopher Anderson : Website

Christopher Anderson : Magnum Photos

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25
Jul
12

Yasuhiro Ogawa : Photography Series

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“Tokyo is noisy, chaotic, but full of a strange silence” – Yasuhiro Ogawa

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“Train for Heihe, China”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“On a Commuter Train”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“Train for Qiqihar”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2011
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“Ferryboat Window, Hokkaido”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2009
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“Ferryboat Terminal”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2008
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“Hotel Window, Hokkaido”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2009
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“TV Monitor in a Park”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“On the Ferryboat”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“Under the Railway Bridge”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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“Funeral, Aoyama”
Yasuhiro Ogawa
Photograph
2010
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Born in 1968, Kanagawa, Japan. Started to take pictures at the age of 24, influenced by the work of Sebastiao Salgado. The first exhibition titled “Futashika-na-Chizu” was held at Ginza Kodak Photo-salon, Tokyo, in 1999. Since then, his work has appeared in many publications in Japan. This year Ogawa won the prestigious Newcomer’s Award from the Photographic Society of Japan for his Slowly Down the River work, from which a couple of these come. The work centers around the construction of the Three Gorges Dam in China, and the profound changes wrought by this massive development. Book

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Yasuhiro Ogawa : Website

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04
Mar
12

Christophe Agou : Street Photography

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‘Under a Cloud Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Under a Cloud Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Reel Fiction Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Life Below Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Life Below Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Life Below Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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‘Reel Fiction Series’
Christophe Agou
Photograph
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Since the early 1990s, Christophe has been building a body of work that takes an allusive approach to the human condition, he’s noted for his intimate and personal documentary black and white and colour photographs. He’s extended his expression into making assemblages and short films, always working intuitively. His intimate images both haunt and intrigue us, creating an rich, layered visual language. bio

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Christophe Agou : Website

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17
Jan
12

Heidi Leverty : ‘Outbox’ Series (Photography)

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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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“This body of work is about recycled and discarded items that no longer perform the functions for which they were intended. What appears to be without value is in fact a source of inspiration, a bounty of objects d’art. Removed from their first use, these materials of paper, metal, plastic and fabric secrete an unexpected visual richness, the product of chance. My art focuses on items that are part of our daily lives, art that is integrated into the culture and community. My intention is to portray the unique and extraordinary in the seemingly ordinary.

Up close, these mundane and discarded objects become poetic abstractions of strength and emotion. As I see these objects condemned to destruction, I experience the conflict between human classification of uselessness, a sense of loss in wasted function and the unexpected attraction of sublime beauty in overlooked places. Bales of shredded paper, cartons, boxes of varied hues and metal sliced like luncheon meat give way to a collage of life in which we all take part.

Unique and ephemeral works, sculptured forms with an intense beauty, all emerge from piles of rusty metal objects and roll of sheet metal. Their colour markings suggesting comparisons with the splashes of Jackson Pollock. Although these images are abstracts in approach, they are documentary in their representation, and powerful enough to create public awareness and make one reflect on the eventual metamorphosis of these used and unwanted products. Simple objects retired from use in passage from refuse to trash to recycled material.” — Heidi Leverty

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Heidi Leverty : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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