Posts Tagged ‘construction

20
Mar
12

Sarah McKenzie : Construction Paintings

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‘Big Box’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2010
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‘Black Box’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2010
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‘Interior 2’
Oil on Canvas
60 x 60 in
2008
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‘Construction 6 pile’
Oil on Wood
20 x 20 in
2008
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‘Fixture’
Oil on Wood
36 x 36 in
2010
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‘Seam’
Oil on Canvas
72 x 72 in
2008
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‘Construction 4’
Oil on Wood
20 x 20 in
2007
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For many years, until 2005, I painted aerial views of suburban sprawl. In my recent work, I have “zoomed in,” to focus on individual tract homes and commercial structures captured in a state of partial construction. These paintings explore the building process and, in it, find a metaphor for the activity of painting. I hope to draw a connection between the construction of a building out of raw materials ( lumber, steel, concrete ) and the construction of a picture out of raw materials ( paint, canvas, wood.)

My paintings are informed both by three-dimensional architectural space and by the pictorial “space” of twentieth century Modernist painting. The generic forms of suburban architecture provide a convenient framework through which I explore the basic structures and issues of geometric abstraction — stripes, grids, flatness vs. depth, color relativity, and so forth. Many of my recent works are marked by distinct moments of visual rupture, where the picture as a whole becomes fragmented.

I am applying paint to the surface in any number of incongruent ways, juxtaposing various painting “styles,” leaving sections of the painting support unpainted, and otherwise undermining the potential for illusionistic space. This disruption of the viewer’s experience is disorienting, but in a good way, for it enables the viewer to see the picture with fresh eyes – to see the picture itself as a construction. The underlying structure of the image is revealed, like the skeletal frame of a building.

At this point, my work is only peripherally about suburbia. Tract homes and strip malls provide the fodder for the paintings and help to place them in a specific cultural moment in time, but the work is ultimately about paint and the nature of pictures. To the extent that my paintings still comment on suburbia, it is through the moments of visual rupture described above, which may be interpreted as revealing the cracks in the suburban American dream. ~ [ Extract : Sarah McKenzie – Artists Statement ]

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Sarah McKenzie : Website

Sarah McKenzie : Jen Bekman Gallery

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26
Jan
12

Elín Hansdóttir : ‘Path’ (Site-Specific Installation)

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Elín Hansdóttir’s site-specific installations take many forms, including auditory or optical illusions, labyrinthian tunnels and motion-activated architectural elements. Hansdóttir creates self-contained worlds that seem to operate under their own set of rules, completely transforming a benign space into one that defies expectations and seems only to exist at a particular moment in time. Though her site-specific installations are complex in construction and technical craft, they take on a stark aesthetic, so that her work operates as a kind of blank slate for viewer experience and interaction.

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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Elín Hansdóttir
Sound: Úlfur Hansson
‘Path’ : Site-Specific Installation
Construction : Jeannot Dupont & Ulf Sturhann
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Path is a site-specific labyrinthine structure that weaves through each space it inhabits, filling the physical area with its winding course. Each exhibition site dictates the form of the zigzagging tunnel. Working with the boundaries determined by the external space, the structure is outlined directly on the floor, with the objective of having the structure occupy as much of the site as possible, thus creating a unique shape each time. The only light source emanates from vertical and horizontal slits throughout the construction. Due to the structure´s sharp edges, the light is dispersed in such a way that one mistakes shadows for walls, walls for space, and light for walls…

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Elín Hansdóttir : Website

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02
Dec
11

Alexis Cladière (36recyclab) : ‘PARASIT’ (Street Art)

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The work of Alexis Cladière (36recyclab) incorporates architecture, design and engineering as well as sculpture, graphic arts and skateboards culture. He builds everything himself from 3D structures, photos, fonts and logos to large scale street exhibitions of tape cutting and 3D modelling. His style has become synonymous with clean, contemporary architectural design and structured visceral compositions, which use the interplay between angles and solidity to create fresh perspectives. [Ext]

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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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36RECYCLAB
Alexis Cladière
‘Poster’
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“These posters you see in the streets of Paris (Bastille-Gare De Lyon) are urban grafts that represent an architecture project of mine, started in 2004 called ‘PARASIT’: it’s an independent structure which is fixed on a building, that lives due to an existent apparatus and lives off of it’s resources (water, electricity, gas, communication networks).

The little part is the inside apartment, the biggest part outside, in front of the building, and it houses the tubes and piping that it feeds off of. I made 3D models of ‘PARASIT’ recently and put them in the streets, completely assembled. Passers by seemed to think that they were machines, photocopiers or survelliance cameras. That is the brilliance of art….People see what they want to see.” Alexis Cladière

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36recyclab

Alexis Cladière : Interview

Alexis Cladière : Galerie Lasecu

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28
Oct
11

Brancolina : Photography

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20052011 14:32

‘20052011 14:32’
photograph
2011

agitation

‘agitation’
photograph
2011

tea for three

‘tea for three’
photograph
2011

parts

‘parts’
photograph
2011

gehry's tune

‘gehry’s tune’
photograph
2011

daydreaming

‘daydreaming’
photograph
2011

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brancolina : it is what it is

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01
Feb
11

Yvonne Lacet : “Movements of a City” (paper sculptures)

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Starting point of this project is the ever-changing urban environment. Places where things are constantly built, demolished and rebuilt. Places where old and new merge in extraordinary ways. By creating transparent paper sculptures of buildings and their surroundings during different periods in time, thus creating locations that are, that will be or that have been, I want to map different eras of a city in a single image. By layering the transparent sculptures you will be able to see the vague shadows of many faces of the city through time. [Extract : Yvonne Lacet – Movements of a City]

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‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

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I am fascinated by city surroundings, nature and interiors where a strong artificial character appears. A shopping mall decorated with flower boxes and lights. A lawn with rows of the same plants, a reception room with orange colored trash bins. Similarity, patterns and construction are keywords to my work. From my observations I create sketches which I develop into paper sculptures. Eventually these sculptures are photographed, which places them back into ‘reality’.

My work is about simplifying things – sights, objects and situations, to images of basic shapes and structures. It’s about removing context and reference from them, and then recreating them with nothing more than basic shapes and materials, like paper squares or sheets. I like to work with paper and cardboard because of the simplicity of the material. A white piece of paper almost stands as a symbol for empty or blank. My work can be seen as models without paint or decoration, a characterless blankness, though with strong resemblance to the living world. [artist statement]

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Yvonne Lacet : Website

23
Nov
10

Mark Citret : Photography

“Photography is simply a function of noticing things.” Elliott Erwitt

Construction Series
Hines Projects
six tubes matson building
1993

Construction Series
UCSF Mission Bay
worker with caulking gun
2005

Construction Series
UCSF Mission Bay
spattered fireproofing
2001

Construction Series
UCSF Mission Bay
footprints
2001

Construction Series
UCSF Mission Bay
unfinished wall
2001

Artifacts Series
Peaked Roof, Sunset District
San Francisco
1999

Construction Series
UCSF Mission Bay
garage-abstract
2005

In the early 1990s, having been a full time photographer for over 25 years, I began carrying a 35mm camera with me at all times. Hardly a radical action, but given how I was “raised” as a photographer—in the tradition of the large format tripod mounted camera, it was a move that went somewhat “against the grain” (if you’ll pardon the expression). Photographing was something that I had always done with deliberation and sustained concentration, and a large and bulky camera. What I began realizing was that I was missing a lot of pictures. I was constantly seeing photographs I wanted to make, and usually in situations where the thought of making photographs was far from my mind—while driving the kids to school or doing any number of day to day errands. In those circumstances it would be impractical to have my camera gear with me and, even if I did, impossible to take the time to stop.

So the idea was to use the small camera to make a quick “sketch” of whatever it was that had caught my eye, and subsequently make an effort to get back to the scene with ample time and the big camera to “do it right”. Seemed like a good plan, but there were a couple of problems with it. The first was that it was simply impossible to “get back to” all the spots where I had jumped out of the car and quickly “sketched”. There were just too many of them. The second, and more profound problem, was that when I did go back with the view camera, even if the time of day was the same, the light similar, and I was standing in the same spot, the picture I had “sketched” before was nowhere to be found on the ground glass. Something intangible was always missing. (Perhaps it was nothing more than the spontaneity of the initial reaction, an ingredient I’ve learned to trust and rely upon).

This would have been unbearably frustrating were it not for the realization that I already had the picture I wanted– on 35mm film exposed “on the fly” with a hand held camera. How absurdly simple—why go on looking for something I had already found? Another thought suggested itself to me: the obvious, (though given my photographic “upbringing”, startling), realization that quantity of negative has nothing to do with quality of seeing. We are constantly surrounded by what the photographer Lou Stouman eloquently referred to as “ordinary miracles” (the title of one of his books). The Camera is a wonderful means of bearing witness. Which particular camera doesn’t really matter.

The photographs in this exhibit and catalogue were made with big cameras on tripods and small cameras handheld. What they have in common is that they all point in a direction to which I have always been drawn. It’s perhaps best described as a fascination with the mundane and the commonplace, which for a moment, because of a quirk of the light, some momentary whimsy or fleeting recognition, become, for lack of a better word, beautiful. In such moments, Daly City, California (my home) or Kanab, Utah become every bit as alluring and stimulating as Paris or New York. And New York or Paris, in the myriad and utterly ordinary masks they usually wear, can be every bit as exotic as Kanab or Daly City. Mark Citret – 2002 [Extract : Artists Statement]

Mark Citret : Website




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