Posts Tagged ‘photographs

07
Jul
12

Cristian Del Risco & Martin Fojtek : ‘Dreamless’ Series

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‘Dreamless’ Series
giclée print & acrylics
95 x 95 cm
2004
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‘Dreamless’ Series
giclée print & acrylics
95 x 95 cm
2004
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‘Dreamless’ Series
giclée print & acrylics
95 x 95 cm
2004
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‘Dreamless’ Series
giclée print & acrylics
95 x 95 cm
2004
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‘Dreamless’ Series
giclée print & acrylics
95 x 95 cm
2004
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These five portraits (giclée prints on canvas) were made by Martin Fojtek and then hand finished with acrylic paint by Cristian Del Risco, making each and every photograph a real original. Both artists worked independently on them with very little influence on each other. The final results are a very interesting combination of minimalistic black and white portraits (two Arabic, Belgian, Italian and Czech personalities, all with particular emotional expression) and colored acrylic ‘J.M.Basquiat’ style paintings.

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Cristian Del Risco & Martin Fojtek : Fotografic

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07
May
12

Janet Jones : ‘Notations’ Series (Collages)

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‘Notations #41’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #7’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #48’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #21’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #37’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #42’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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‘Notations #39’
6 x 6 inches
Collage
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“My series is called Notations, and reflects my love of letter forms and typography, of words and language, and a delight in the visual and tactile properties of old books and documents, especially those that are creased, stained and foxed. I’m interested in surface variations and the play of light on shiny areas contrasting with the velvety softness of old papers. In a larger sense, they’re about communication, nuance and layers of meaning. I’ve stencilled some letters in shiny etching ink, occasionally adding metal leaf, and printed letterpress ornaments and a Chinese character. Some papers have been prepared by pouring and splattering India ink. The tiny photographs are my mother at ages 20 months, 3 years, and 25. Other images are from dictionaries and old steel engravings.” ~ JJ

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Janet Jones : Website

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20
Apr
11

Azurebumble : Fragmental (Book)

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AZUREBUMBLE : FRAGMENTAL (BOOK)

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Back/Front Cover

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“Fragmental” consists of ‘six’ series of digital artworks, each having evolved from small sections cut from photographs. A process where these basic elements have been combined and recombined numerous times to produce an extensive vocabulary of shapes and forms. With no preconceived ideas, I begin to play and improvise with these pieces allowing my imagination to create compositions, perhaps based on a simple pattern, an interesting association or architectural element, or maybe they’ll suggest some surreal narrative. These constructions can then form the basis for a continuation of this process, whereby selecting the most interesting aspects of these new images and placing them into the original pool, can create possibilities for fresh combinations and different ideas. This continual process of deconstruction and reconstruction also makes it possible to trace the evolution of specific elements throughout a number of incarnations and series. Despite the multiple choices this technique allows, I think it’s also important to introduce source material from outside the pool. Lately, using a similar process, I have been ‘remixing’ works by another photographer (Fernandoprats) and ‘refurbishing’ and ‘reimagining’ an old photograph by Andreas Feininger. In time, certain aspects of these series could possibly be integrated with earlier works to produce new and interesting hybrids.

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EXTRACTS

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‘Red Constructions’ Series
Digital Collage
2009

‘Constructions’ Series
Digital Collage
2009-10

‘Postcards for Fernando’ Series
Digital Collage
2010

‘Fernando Remixed’ Series
Digital Collage
2011

‘Feininger Reimagined’ Series
Digital Collage
2011

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VIEW FULL BOOK ONLINE

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Azurebumble : Website

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01
Feb
11

Yvonne Lacet : “Movements of a City” (paper sculptures)

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Starting point of this project is the ever-changing urban environment. Places where things are constantly built, demolished and rebuilt. Places where old and new merge in extraordinary ways. By creating transparent paper sculptures of buildings and their surroundings during different periods in time, thus creating locations that are, that will be or that have been, I want to map different eras of a city in a single image. By layering the transparent sculptures you will be able to see the vague shadows of many faces of the city through time. [Extract : Yvonne Lacet – Movements of a City]

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‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

‘Movements of a City’
Photograph
66 x 80 cm
2010

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I am fascinated by city surroundings, nature and interiors where a strong artificial character appears. A shopping mall decorated with flower boxes and lights. A lawn with rows of the same plants, a reception room with orange colored trash bins. Similarity, patterns and construction are keywords to my work. From my observations I create sketches which I develop into paper sculptures. Eventually these sculptures are photographed, which places them back into ‘reality’.

My work is about simplifying things – sights, objects and situations, to images of basic shapes and structures. It’s about removing context and reference from them, and then recreating them with nothing more than basic shapes and materials, like paper squares or sheets. I like to work with paper and cardboard because of the simplicity of the material. A white piece of paper almost stands as a symbol for empty or blank. My work can be seen as models without paint or decoration, a characterless blankness, though with strong resemblance to the living world. [artist statement]

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Yvonne Lacet : Website

18
Sep
10

Robert Rauschenberg : Prints (The Lotus Series)

Lotus V (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus I (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus III (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus II (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus VI (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

Lotus IX (The Lotus Series)
Pigmented ink-jet with photogravure on Somerset velvet
45 3/4 x 60 x 1 3/4 inches
2008

When we are looking at The Lotus Series, like most of Rauschenberg’s work, we never see a photograph in isolation. Even though he was an excellent photographer, at some level he must have felt that a single image would not be real enough, unable to convey all of the life and energy that he saw spinning around him. The single image was too fixed, too stable, too much about one-point perspective. By contrast, he wanted to convey what it felt like to be alive. He was not trying to make art with the prints, but he was trying to show you the art that surrounds us everyday. Almost anything can be art; you just have to look at it in a certain way. In an uncanny way, he had the incredible ability to find Combines no matter where he went. Early on in his career he made them himself, later he just took photographs when he encountered them during his travels. Rauschenberg was opening himself to the world around him, trying to be open to the potential for art latent in his every experience.

The new prints seem to be less about objects being photographed and transferred to a print, but more about the raw experience of a place. The original negatives from his trip to China (1983-85) were destroyed in a hurricane. Fortunately, small prints were discovered that would become the source images for these large-scale prints of The Lotus Series. These images were scanned by Bill Goldston who was able to enlarge the images and correct the color. The next step was to print out the source images in different sizes so that Rauschenberg would be able to arrange the images for the final prints. The enlarged photos of his trip to China were made with an ink that allows the image to be transferred to another piece of paper by use of a solvent. This process eventually created an original, which was scanned and reproduced for the final prints. For me, this is a critical part of the Rauschenberg’s process; the photographs were the starting point, not the end point. [Extract : Portland Art]

The Lotus Series : Larissa Goldston Gallery

Robert Rauschenberg : Greenfield Sacks Gallery

09
Jul
10

Richard Long : Textworks

Click Images For Text On  White Background

Nature has always been recorded by artists, from pre-historic cave paintings to 20th century landscape photography. I too wanted to make nature the subject of my work, but in new ways. I started working outside using natural materials like grass and water, and this evolved into the idea of making a sculpture by walking. Walking itself has a cultural history, from Pilgrims to the wandering Japanese poets, the English Romantics and contemporary long-distance walkers.

My first work made by walking, in 1967, was a straight line in a grass field, which was also my own path, going ‘nowhere’. In the subsequent early map works, recording very simple but precise walks on Exmoor and Dartmoor, my intention was to make a new art which was also a new way of walking: walking as art. Each walk followed my own unique, formal route, for an original reason, which was different from other categories of walking, like travelling. Each walk, though not by definition conceptual, realised a particular idea. Thus walking – as art – provided an ideal means for me to explore relationships between time, distance, geography and measurement. These walks are recorded or described in my work in three ways: in maps, photographs or text works, using whichever form is the most appropriate for each different idea. All these forms feed the imagination, they are the distillation of experience. Richard Long

TEXTWORKS

EXHIBITION WORKS

HEAVEN AND EARTH : TATE BRITAIN




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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