Posts Tagged ‘woodcuts

28
Jul
10

Wassily Kandinsky : Klänge (Sounds)

Front Cover
from Klänge (Sounds)

Judgement Day
from Klänge (Sounds)

Black Spot
from Klänge (Sounds)

Improvisation 19
from Klänge (Sounds)

Riding path
from Klänge (Sounds)

Motif from Improvisation 25
from Klänge (Sounds)

Klänge (Sounds)

Sounds comprised thirty-eight prose poems which were accompanied by twelve colour and forty-four black and white woodcuts, each hand-printed under Kandinsky’s supervision. It was published in an edition of 345 c.1912.

The poems contained in the album draw attention to and manipulate the sounds of words in such a way as to destabilise their conventional meanings. ‘Words’, Kandinsky wrote in On the Spiritual in Art, ‘are inner sounds … Skilful use of a word (according to poetic feeling) – an internally necessary repetition of a word twice, three times – can lead [to] unrealised spiritual qualities of the word. Eventually, manifold repetition … makes it lose its external sense as a name’. With this quest for ‘inner meaning’, ‘great possibilities open up for the literature of the future’ as language breaks from the constraints of its traditional usage.

As we read the poems, acoustic rhythms couple with spatial ones to halt our progress through them: we find ourselves re-reading, our eyes moving around the poems, attempting to re-engage or re-enter the works. The sound of the words and the unconventional spacing of words across the page, as well as the remnants of narrative, both ‘articulate’ and ‘dis-articulate’ the whole. The process of re-reading and moving visually around the poem seems to make the text more open: syntax and narrative are lost; the spaces between and beyond words, lines and stanzas, appear to threaten the unity of the text; and – according to Kandinsky’s claims – the words may evoke psychological, synaesthetic or even spiritual associations beyond their literal meanings. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Tate Papers : A Consideration of the Album ‘Sounds’

14
Jul
10

Georges Braque : Birds

“Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry” Georges Braque

Georges Braque
October bird
1962
Lithograph

Georges Braque
If I died over there
Wood Engraving
1962

Georges Braque
Birds
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
Birds on Blue
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
The white bird
1961
Lithograph

Georges Braque
The Library is on fire
1956
Etching

Georges Braque
Night Flight
1957
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two birds on blue background
1960
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two Birds
1958
Serigraph

Georges Braque
The Duck
1956
Oil and gouache on panel

Throughout his life, Braque produced numerous prints, mastering the techniques of etching, lithography, aqua-tint and woodcut. Unlike etching however, which relies more on the technique of drawing, lithography leans more toward painting allowing the artist to use color in his compositions. Braque’s lithographs however are not merely imitations of his paintings. In his early lithographs he reacted to the possibilities offered by the medium and achieved a texture that was foreign to his etchings and a transparency quite different from the density of his oil paintings.

In 1945, after a short hiatus, Braque returned to lithography and he continued to pursue this until the end of his life. This time his approach to the medium is different in that he no longer allows the grain but only the color to speak. He rejects the accurate capabilities of the line and instead deliberately thickens his strokes to give them a more painterly feel. The stroke is sufficiently thick so that even when black is used, it will have the impact of a color. This unusual quality of line should not be mistaken for mishandling or inexperience but rather a shift to a more painterly style and point of view.

Georges Braque Prints

Georges Braque Lithographs

07
Jul
10

Kitagawa Utamaro : Ukiyo-e

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Kitagawa Utamaro : Woodcut

Utamaro produced over two thousand prints during his working career, along with a number of paintings, surimono, as well as many illustrated books, including over thirty shunga books, albums, and related publications. Among his best known works are the series Ten Studies in Female Physiognomy; A Collection of Reigning Beauties; Great Love Themes of Classical Poetry (sometimes called Women in Love containing individual prints such as Revealed Love and Pensive Love); and Twelve Hours in the Pleasure Quarters. He alone, of his contemporary ukiyo-e artists, achieved a national reputation during his lifetime. His sensuous female beauties generally are considered the finest and most evocative bijinga in all of ukiyo-e. He succeeded in capturing subtle aspects of personality and transient moods of women of all classes, ages, and circumstances. His reputation has remained undiminished since; his work is known worldwide, and he is generally regarded as one of the half-dozen greatest ukiyo-e artists of all time. [extract : wikipedia]

Kitigawa Utamaro




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aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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