Posts Tagged ‘volume

16
Apr
12

El Lissitzky : ‘Prouns’ Series

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the station where one changes from painting to architecture.” ~ El Lissitzky

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‘Announcer’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Globetrotter in Time’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Neuer (New Man)’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Untitled’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Tatlin at Work’
El Lissitzky
1921
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‘Proun G7’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’ was essentially El Lissitzky’s exploration of the visual language of suprematism with spatial elements, utilizing shifting axes and multiple perspectives; both uncommon ideas in suprematism. Suprematism at the time was conducted almost exclusively in flat, 2D forms and shapes, and El Lissitzky, with a taste for architecture and other 3D concepts, tried to expand suprematism beyond this. His Proun works spanned over a half a decade and evolved from straightforward paintings and lithographs into fully three-dimensional installations. They would also lay the foundation for his later experiments in architecture and exhibition design. While the paintings were artistic in their own right, their use as a staging ground for his early architectonic ideas was significant. In these works, the basic elements of architecture – volume, mass, color, space and rhythm – were subjected to a fresh formulation in relation to the new suprematist ideals. Through his Prouns, utopian models for a new world were developed. This approach, in which the artist creates art with socially defined purpose, could aptly be summarized with his edict “das zielbewußte Schaffen” – “task oriented creation.” ~ [Ext]

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El Lissitzky : More Works

El Lissitzky : Russian Constructivists

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09
Nov
10

Alex Posada : Making of ‘The Particle’

“The Particle” is a kinetic sculpture that experiments with color, sound and movement. The continuous rotation, speed and light create visual POV, effects that define the spatial structure of the object. The translucent skin created from the moving light becomes visible, creating shape and volume, both inside and outside the object. How light emerges from the limited movement of each of the rings when there is a change in external conditions (visitors) or there is a random mutation. The sculpture forms and reacts by generating events that modulate the sound and space, constantly changing atmosphere and perception. Given that the regulatory mechanism of the entire design is based on the decision making haphazard manner, the new models are emerging from the previous naturally. The vibration of sound, color and visual patterns evolve into chaos or order according to evolutionary algorithms that govern it. The structures generated in this process can not be anticipated and evolve through continual iterations involving alterations to the programs and exploring the changes through interaction with the visitor and the software. The object, at the same time is a space for sensory and kinesthetic experience, a body with its own internal resonance.

Technology
RGB leds, POV animation and robotic structure
Custom hardware with zigbee wireless controllers
Software for designing animation and controling lighting
3D sound

Support & credits
Technology of the Kinetic Sculpture: MID
Supported by hangar.org and Strobe Festival

Concept & Direction: Alex Posada
Design: Bartosz Zygmunt
Electronics: M. A. de Heras
Mechanics: Raul M. Beteta

Alex Posada : Blog

Alex Posada : Vimeo

17
Sep
10

Norbert Frensch : Paintings

SO 2-01
Oil on Dammar on Canvas
170 x 210 cm
2001

WI 3-01
Oil on Dammar on Canvas
110 x 135 cm
2001

F-10-01
Oil on Dammar on Canvas
110 x 135 cm
2001

Norbert Frensch’s paintings do not merely record what is to be seen. The fact that the viewer finds orientation only gradually, very slowly recognising the outline of a bowl bathed in pale light against the dark background, beginning to sense the presence of a volume, is trivial in and on itself. The point is not the object itself. What appears to the eye is merely the point of departure for an unusual kind of painting that articulates the process of becoming visible. By concealing what appears but revealing how something appears, painting transforms itself from a mode of depiction to a form of art that visibly reflects upon what it brings forth itself. [Extract : Thomas Wagner : catalogue Wiesbaden, 2002, pp50]

Norbert Frensch : Galerie-m-Bochum

29
Aug
10

Peter K Koch : No-Form-System

No-Form-System (Rules the World)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2007

No-Form-System (Magie)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2007

No-Form-System (Honor)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2008

No-Form-System (Gespenst)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2007

No-Form-System (Side to side)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2008

No-Form-System (Kanone)
piezo pigment print
170 x 122 cm
2008

“No-Form System” is the title of a series of images by Berlin based artist Peter K. Koch. He folds and cracks printed or colored paper from different sources, scans the results and blows up the data for final print. During the creative process of each particular work the borders between both surface and volume as well as those between presentation and representation are first resolved and then blurred.

Peter K Koch : Selected Works

12
Jul
10

Donald Judd : ‘The Simple Expression Of Complex Thought’.

Donald Judd
Cloth in Illustrated Jacket
1993

Donald Judd
Untitled
1987

Donald Judd
Menziken 87-55
1987

Donald Judd
Untitled
1974

Donald Judd
Untitled
1971

Donald Judd
Untitled (Core Piece)
1969

Donald Judd
Untitled
1972

One of the most significant American artists of the post-war period, Donald Judd changed the course of modern sculpture. Working in New York in the 1960s, Judd became known as one of the key exponents of ‘Minimalism’, but it was a label that he strongly rejected. Although he shared many of the principles identified with Minimalist art — the use of industrial materials to create abstract works that emphasise the purity of colour, form, space and materials — he preferred to describe his own work as ‘the simple expression of complex thought’.

In the late 1940s he began to practice as a painter, but by the late 1950s was working to free his painting of traditional ‘European’ preoccupations with composition and illusionism. In the early 1960s, Judd began to introduce three dimensional elements onto the surface of his works, at first creating reliefs, and then moving towards entirely free-standing structures which he called ‘specific objects’. By 1963 he had established an essential vocabulary of forms — ‘stacks’, ‘boxes’ and ‘progressions’ — which preoccupied him for the next thirty years.

Judd broke new ground in his exploration of volume, interval, space and colour . He rejected the tradition of artistic expression and craftsmanship by using industrial materials such as Plexiglas, sheet metal and plywood, and from the mid-1960s his works were fabricated by external manufacturers. By encouraging concentration on the volume and presence of the structure and the space around it, Judd’s work draws particular attention to the relationship between the object, the viewer, and its environment. This relationship became a central focus of Judd’s career, and he devoted much of his later life to the sympathetic installation of his own work.

Judd’s engagement with philosophy, architecture, design and politics informed his own work, and influenced succeeding generations of artists and designers. His pared-down forms and sensuous use of industrial materials remain a feature of much contemporary art, architecture and design. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Donald Judd : Tate Collection

Nick Serota on Donald Judd : Videos

12
Jul
10

Chris Cornish : Project Cube

cube 001, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 002, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 001 (detail), 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 003, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 003, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 003, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 004, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 004, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

cube 004, 2009,
plaster, 18cm x 18cm x 18cm

A cube primitive is fractured and exposed to physical dynamics. A sequential test, exploring notions of space, volume and time, resulting in an object that is both poetic, turbulent and null. A collaboration with Alison Moffett.

Chris Cornish Website




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