Posts Tagged ‘viewer

05
Feb
12

Felice Varini : Site-Specific Installations (Paintings)

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‘Ellipse in red trapezoid’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Trapezoid in red ellipse’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Red ellipse for the window’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1995
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‘Eight eccentric circles No.1’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1998
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‘Three red triangles’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2001
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‘Ellipse on two points’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1997
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‘Ellipse with six circular holes’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2000
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“My field of action is architectural space and everything that constitutes such space These spaces are and remain the original media for my painting. I work “on site” each time in a different space and my work develops itself in relation to the spaces I encounter. I generally roam through the space noting its architecture, materials, history and function. From these spatial data and in reference to the last piece I produced, I designate a specific vantage point for viewing from which my intervention takes shape.

The vantage point is carefully chosen: it is generally situated at my eye level and located preferably along an inevitable route, for instance an aperture between one room and another, a landing… I do not, however, make a rule out of this, for all spaces do not systematically possess an evident line. It is often an arbitrary choice. The vantage point will function as a reading point, that is to say, as a potential starting point to approaching painting and space.

The painted form achieves its coherence when the viewer stands at the vantage point.When he moves out of it, the work meets with space generating infinite vantage points on the form. It is not therefore through this original vantage point that I see the work achieved; it takes place in the set of vantage points the viewer can have on it. If I establish a particular relation to architectural features that influence the installation shape, my work still preserves its independence whatever architectural spaces I encounter. I start from an actual situation to construct my painting. Reality is never altered, erased or modified, it interests and seduces me in its complexity. I work “here and now”. – Felice Varini

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Felice Varini : Website

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28
Sep
10

Pierre Soulages : Paintings

“I think I make paintings so that those who look at them, myself like everybody else,
can find themselves in front of them, alone with themselves,” Pierre Soulages

Pierre Soulages
Walnut stain 76 x 54 cm, 2004 B-
Walnut stain on paper
2004

Pierre Soulages
Walnut stain, 108 x 75 cm, 2004 A-7
Walnut stain on paper
2004

Pierre Soulages
Walnut stain, 108 x 75 cm, 2004 A-
Acrylic on canvas
2004

Pierre Soulages
Painting, 22nd April 2002
200 x 220 cm
2002

In 1979 after three decades as an internationally successful artist, Soulages embarked upon a new type of painting. Having always been interested in light he began to make paintings which were totally black. These new works he described as Outre Noir (beyond black). With contrasting areas of matt and gloss paint and ridges and gashes across their surface, these paintings draw focus on light’s reflection – changing with the light conditions and with the position of the viewer in front of the painting.

Now 90 years old, Pierre Soulages has been recently honoured by having a painting exhibited in the Louvre and a major retrospective of his work at the Centre Pompidou in Paris, currently on tour in Mexico, before heading to Berlin in the autumn. In Paris the retrospective was seen by over 500,000 people, making it the 4th most visited exhibition in the history of the Pompidou (after Dali, Matisse and Kandinsky), an astounding feat for an abstract minimalist painter. [Extract : Bernard Jacobson Gallery]

Pierre Soulages : Bernard Jacobson Gallery

Pierre Soulages: Black and Light (minimal exposition)

Pierre Soulages : New Work (Audio)

12
Jul
10

Donald Judd : ‘The Simple Expression Of Complex Thought’.

Donald Judd
Cloth in Illustrated Jacket
1993

Donald Judd
Untitled
1987

Donald Judd
Menziken 87-55
1987

Donald Judd
Untitled
1974

Donald Judd
Untitled
1971

Donald Judd
Untitled (Core Piece)
1969

Donald Judd
Untitled
1972

One of the most significant American artists of the post-war period, Donald Judd changed the course of modern sculpture. Working in New York in the 1960s, Judd became known as one of the key exponents of ‘Minimalism’, but it was a label that he strongly rejected. Although he shared many of the principles identified with Minimalist art — the use of industrial materials to create abstract works that emphasise the purity of colour, form, space and materials — he preferred to describe his own work as ‘the simple expression of complex thought’.

In the late 1940s he began to practice as a painter, but by the late 1950s was working to free his painting of traditional ‘European’ preoccupations with composition and illusionism. In the early 1960s, Judd began to introduce three dimensional elements onto the surface of his works, at first creating reliefs, and then moving towards entirely free-standing structures which he called ‘specific objects’. By 1963 he had established an essential vocabulary of forms — ‘stacks’, ‘boxes’ and ‘progressions’ — which preoccupied him for the next thirty years.

Judd broke new ground in his exploration of volume, interval, space and colour . He rejected the tradition of artistic expression and craftsmanship by using industrial materials such as Plexiglas, sheet metal and plywood, and from the mid-1960s his works were fabricated by external manufacturers. By encouraging concentration on the volume and presence of the structure and the space around it, Judd’s work draws particular attention to the relationship between the object, the viewer, and its environment. This relationship became a central focus of Judd’s career, and he devoted much of his later life to the sympathetic installation of his own work.

Judd’s engagement with philosophy, architecture, design and politics informed his own work, and influenced succeeding generations of artists and designers. His pared-down forms and sensuous use of industrial materials remain a feature of much contemporary art, architecture and design. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Donald Judd : Tate Collection

Nick Serota on Donald Judd : Videos




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