Posts Tagged ‘transparency.

30
Nov
12

James Bourret : “Winter’s Veil” Series (Photography)

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“I seek to create richly evocative, emotional images from nature,
reflecting the mood, form, colors, and patterns of a scene.” J Bourret

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‘Winter’s Veil’ #10
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #26
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #28
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #27
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #2
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #6
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #44
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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The water’s edge has been a source of fascination for me since I can remember. The changing landscape, the effects of current and water volume, light, and temperature all make the river’s edge different from day to day. Seasonal progression brings further changes, with winter bringing the growing and changing veil of ice along the bank, increasing until the surface is solid. Even then, the ice changes in shape and transparency on a daily basis, thinning, clearing, cracking, buckling, melting and freezing again, and eventually moving tectonically downstream.

These highly abstract images seek to transcend boundaries of formal and scale recognition. Flowing lines and curved forms in the ice are interrupted by spiky, angular forms and layered textures. The seemingly random crystalline forms and structures evoke associations with landforms (aerial photography) and microcrystalline structures (photomicrography) and leave room for endless possibilities of interpretation. Therefore, as a photographer, they offer the opportunity to find and make strongly graphic yet highly detailed, rich images. [artist statement]

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James Bourret : Portfolio

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 1)

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Friedlander began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. His photographs bring to the surface the juxtapositions of everyday life that comprise our modern world. Beyond the vigorous outward eye he turns to the world around him, Lee is also recognized for his investigation of the self.

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Lee Friedlander is internationally recognized as one of America’s most important contemporary photographers. In the 1960’s his silver print photographs, described as “open-ended alternatives to normal seeing,” provided a shockingly new aesthetic of asymmetrical and fragmented images of the United States. Lacking defined borders and layered with a disjointed profusion of architectural and advertising elements, his photographs were visually equivalent to the broken, improvisational rhythms of jazz. Working within the tradition of Eugene Atget, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Robert Frank, Lee was one of the first modern photographers to portray the “social landscape” of America as a complex mixture of order and chaos, warmth and alienation, refinement, and commercialism. [Extract]

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Lee Friedlander : Atget Photography

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 2)

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Friedlander often included oblique references to himself by including his own reflection or shadow in the photographs. – “I suspect it’s for one’s self-interest that one looks at one’s surroundings and one’s self. This search is personally borne and is indeed my reason and motive for making photographs.”

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Lee Friedlander’s unique vision underscores the two-dimensionality of the picture plane and the potential for photographs to contain varying levels of reflection, opacity, and transparency. Like Atget’s photographs, Friedlander’s images of shop windows evoke a certain ambiguity, an oscillation between reflected and actual reality, that invite inspection of the space and the meaning of the image. Similar responses are encouraged by Friedlander’s street photographs, in which shadows of figures (usually Friedlander himself) and other subjects overlap in the photographic image. The projected outline of Friedlander’s body as within the picture frame implies the notion that the photographer can be both behind the camera and in front of it. Interpreted further, Friedlander’s shadow can be taken to represent the imposition of the photographer upon his world and his subject. [Extract : MoCP]

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Lee Friedlander : MoMA

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01
Dec
11

Kendall Buster : ‘New Growth’ (Architectural Structures)

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An inventory of architectural models that operates in the territory where architecture and biology might meet; an imagined city where old forms generate new forms through processes that suggest germination, budding, merging, hybridization, or absorption. This model city is a single organism conceived of as a functioning system of interdependent parts. It is also a grouping of autonomous structures that operate like competitive independent organisms in a loose highly provisional community. Some are connected by passageways that suggest either umbilical cords or parasitic invasions. Contiguous membranes create distinct regions in the city and the transparency of these membranes allow inner layer to be visible through outer shell. These porous membranes also operate as a continuous plane where an exterior protective shell wall folds to become an interior vessel lining wall.

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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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‘New Growth’
Shadecloth, Steel
Boise Art Museum
2007
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I have long been fascinated by the way in which architectural structures embrace, contain, shelter, frame, and even control the individuals who inhabit them, and explore this notion by building sculptures that for me operate both as scale models for imaginary buildings and as sites of enclosure with accessible spaces. My initial study in microbiology and my interest in the history of architecture results in works informed by both details of buildings from various historical periods and by biological morphologies. My aim is to build a sculpture that appears to have been built with a precise blueprint, while at the same time contradict this notion with some demonstration of that structure (or grouping of structures) as a dynamic system.

Though my sculptures reside in a place between object and architecture, most have human-scale chambers and all are constructed with a play between interior and exterior space. Some works are autonomous and singular, and these lone forms are typically designed with radial symmetry to suggest an enormous vessel or an isolated building. Here my design seems driven by a need for an almost classical sense of order and a ‘true center’ in the interior space of the form. However, in New Growth, as in most of my more recent works I build with heterogeneous parts in fields or in asymmetrical groupings, and this is for me resonant not only with the notion of biological growth, but also with the manner in which architectural structures form and re-form the fabric of cities over time. This new work reflects an expanded vocabulary of architectural sources and an interest in a shift towards greater complexity in the combination and collision of components in my design. [Extract : ‘New Growth’ Project]

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Kendall Buster : Website

Kendall Buster : Preparatory Work

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07
Mar
11

AVPD : Transparency White (D)

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“We define our spatial works as meta-architectures where the normal perception of the spectator is challenged and displaced and a new experience of space is made possible. In our works, we try to rethink the triangular constellation of the subject, the object and the context. We are interested in how spatial constructions effect the perception of the spectator and how she/he grasps the space in a cognitive, emotional and intellectual way. Our domain is reality and our artistic praxis is a spatial laboratory.” avpd

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Transparency White – TW01D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW02D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW03D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW04D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW05D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW06D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW07D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Only by the use of A4 transparency film (which is normally used for overhead projectors) mounted in several layers in different combinations this series of works examines the perception of how the light penetrates the layered transparency film creating vibrant light differentiated surfaces/tones. The visibility of the works depends on the light angle which makes the perception of each work physical because the viewer has to move the body to find the right angle to make the work appear. [AVPD]

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AVPD : Website

AVPD : Galeria Leme

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20
Dec
10

László Moholy-Nagy : Photography

Stairway in the Bexhill Seaside Pavillion
gelatin silver print
50.5 x 40.3 cm
1936

View from the Pont Transbordeau, Marseille – Iron Column
gelatin silver print
49.9 x 40.0 cm
1929

special effects for the H.G. Wells – A. Korda film, “Things to Come”
gelatin silver print
18.6 x 23.4 cm
1936

Light display mobile
gelatin silver print
27.3 x 20.8 cm
ca. 1925

László Moholy-Nagy
Light Space Modulator
1922-1930
Model

Light painting on hinged celluloid, (position 1)
gelatin silver print
19.1 x 24.0 cm
1936

But what of his camera photography? Even today Moholy’s published and exhibited camera photographs are invariably images he made in Europe. Photo historians appear to assume that Moholy gave up camera photography after he arrived in Chicago. Yet he did continue to photograph, primarily with a 35 mm Leica camera he had acquired in England. The main cause of this historical misconception is that Moholy no longer appeared interested in bringing his camera images before the public. Although a few black and white images intended as advertisements have survived, most are personal records of his family. Another important factor is that during the 1940s, Moholy photographed primarily in color. He continued to experiment with the new Kodachrome slide film that had come on the market in 1937. He made hundreds of 35 mm color slides, of which a remnant has survived. They depict all of the subjects of his earlier black/white photographs: travel pictures, portraits, formalist compositions, as well as documentation of the activities of the School. He made beautiful abstract images, successfully creating works of art from nothing but light and color. But the processes of color reproduction of that time were simply not up to his standards and so his latest camera photography is still virtually unknown.

[Extract : Biography The Moholy-Nagy Foundation]

László Moholy-Nagy : George Eastman House

The Moholy-Nagy Foundation




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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