Posts Tagged ‘transience

17
Jan
12

Stanko Abadzic : Photography

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“The faster we live, the less emotion is left in the world. The slower we live, the deeper we feel the world around us, ” he says. “I am not against globalization in general, but I am against the physical and spiritual uniformity of cities and towns being dominated by multinational corporations. Globalization turns us into passive consumers. It is not interested in our creativity or our individuality. We lose our happiness when we lose our sense of identity.” – Stanko Abadzic

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‘People Who Live in Glass Houses’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Boy on a Railing’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Berlin Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Fun Fair Ride’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Shadows and Beach Scene’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Adriatic Routes Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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‘Berlin Series’
Stanko Abadzic
Photograph
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One of the great ironies of globalization is that as people become more connected to technology–email, cell phones, Ipods–they often become less connected to one another. This growing rift in the social fabric has been duly noted by Croatia’s Stanko Abadzic, whose deeply humanistic photographs resonate with wistful regard for a time when people were in tune with each other spiritually and emotionally rather than electronically. This accounts for the seemingly “old- fashioned” aesthetic of his images, many of which, with their geometric composition, sensual atmosphere and telling detail, look as if they could have been made in the 1940s or earlier. [Ex : Black & White magazine’s March 2007 issue]

“The mass media bombard us with images of blood and tears, “he states.” It’s high time we showed interest in beauty and aesthetics, not just in wars and catastrophes. I still believe photography can touch people emotionally. I believe a photograph can be a testimony and a document of its time, and that it can inspire us to talk to each other and make a better world…”

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Stanko Abadzic : Website

Stanko Abadzic : Verve Gallery

Stanko Abadzic : Contemporary Works

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26
Nov
11

Arthur Ou : ‘Test Screens’ Series (Photo-Media)

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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2011
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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2008
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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2008
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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2008
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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2008
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Arthur Ou
‘Test Screens’
Archival pigment print
2010
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Arthur Ou is a Taiwanese artist currently living and working in New York. He is an Associate Professor of Photography at Parsons New School for Design in New York and is exhibiting in Sydney for the first time. He is showing a selection from his Test Screens series of innovative landscape photo-media works in which he intentionally interferes with the direct view by incorporating a layer of ‘drawing’ or ‘painting’ with light into the photographic space.

The artist manipulates the black and white film at negative stage with bleaching and masking techniques. After shooting the coastal locations for his Test Screen series, a bleach solution is applied to the black and white negative film. This removes the emulsion to form clear areas on the negative where the light goes through and which will appear as black in the finished print. In some works a stencil is prepared for the text or lines are masked out and bleach is applied through the mask for more defined edges. This is a subtractive process but these forms appear added or overlaid when printed.

His overall practice incorporates architecture, sculpture, ceramics and photo-media. East-West themes and aesthetics are a constant in his art; aligned with his personal cultural experience and history. While his works embody a notion of transience, operating within and expressive of the space where cultures meet, the pervading implication throughout his practice is the migration of ideas through art.

[Extract : Artereal Gallery]

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Arthur Ou : Website

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09
Feb
11

Adam Magyar : “Stainless” Series (Photography)

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“In the “Stainless” series I scan rushing subway trains arriving to stations. The images record a number of tiny details of this moment. We see people staring towards their destinations standing at the doors framed by the sliding door windows. They’re scrutinizing the uncertain future. Similarly to all my images, their main motivation is arrival. The darkness of the tunnels deep below the city turns these chemically clean mock-ups into fossils of our time.” A. Magyar

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#8191
New York
231 x 80 cm
2010

#6423
Tokyo
214 x 80 cm
2010

#03621
Tokyo
197 x 80 cm
2010

#26872
Tokyo
280 x 120 cm
2010

#7649
New York
270 x 120 cm
2010

#7258
New York
180 x 80 cm
2010

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While spending extensive time in cities like Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kolkata and New York, I was getting increasingly fascinated by man-made structures. I consider all man’s scientific achievements an integral part of human evolution. So, to me the city is not less of a natural environment than the rain forest. It is an ever-present human desire to go further and leave some trace behind in the fraction of the time we are given. My drive is not different. I aim to grasp the devices at hand, push towards new frontiers by converting already existing technologies for photography in the hope of coming up with something new, a new device, a new language, a new frontier.

The factor of time is essential both in our private history and for humanity as a community. I am more interested in the drama of our own transience. In my works I capture man’s finite time in infinity. In my images I “stage” a situation where people are seen from a distance and I depict them as particles in a system. The observer of this scene is an imaginary person, looking at the whole as an outsider, as if exempt from the laws of time. I also perceive time and events taking place subjectively, consequently inappropriately. I find particular events more important than others, so I would instinctively emphasize them in my compositions. To eliminate this problem, I’m experimenting with systems that relate to reality like watches and record series of events objectively. I build digital camera systems, adopt industrial machine-vision cameras and set up script-driven post processing methods. [artist statement]

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The images above and other series can be zoomed and magnified at the link below.

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Adam Magyar : Website

11
Jan
11

Stephen Inggs : Photography

“The photograph does not necessarily say what is no longer, but only and for certain what has been”
Roland Barthes, Camera Lucida, 1984

‘shears’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2009

‘horns 3’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2005

‘dividers’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2004

‘letters’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2002

‘measure’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2009

‘propeller’
silver gelatin emulsion
on 100% rag paper
2006

These works consists of powerful yet delicate large scale photographs, each one hand-coated with silver gelatin emulsion onto 100% cotton mould-made paper, using traditional techniques. The handmade, tactile and physical aspects of this process are used to underline the references to history, transience and the overlooked object. Each piece is therefore a unique and original work of art.

Stephen Inggs : More Works

Stephen Inggs : ‘Platteland’ Series

Stephen Inggs : HackelBury Fine Art

09
Jul
10

Richard Long : Textworks

Click Images For Text On  White Background

Nature has always been recorded by artists, from pre-historic cave paintings to 20th century landscape photography. I too wanted to make nature the subject of my work, but in new ways. I started working outside using natural materials like grass and water, and this evolved into the idea of making a sculpture by walking. Walking itself has a cultural history, from Pilgrims to the wandering Japanese poets, the English Romantics and contemporary long-distance walkers.

My first work made by walking, in 1967, was a straight line in a grass field, which was also my own path, going ‘nowhere’. In the subsequent early map works, recording very simple but precise walks on Exmoor and Dartmoor, my intention was to make a new art which was also a new way of walking: walking as art. Each walk followed my own unique, formal route, for an original reason, which was different from other categories of walking, like travelling. Each walk, though not by definition conceptual, realised a particular idea. Thus walking – as art – provided an ideal means for me to explore relationships between time, distance, geography and measurement. These walks are recorded or described in my work in three ways: in maps, photographs or text works, using whichever form is the most appropriate for each different idea. All these forms feed the imagination, they are the distillation of experience. Richard Long

TEXTWORKS

EXHIBITION WORKS

HEAVEN AND EARTH : TATE BRITAIN




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