Posts Tagged ‘Tokyo

22
Jul
12

Martin Stavars : “Nightscapes – Tokyo” Series (Photography)

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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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“Nightscapes-Tokyo”
Martin Stavars
Photograph
2010
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I’ve always been fascinated by landscapes – places that are absolutely desolate, where I can stay one on one with nature. For me, the growing joy right before pressing the shutter button as well as the possibility of interacting with the world filled with inspiration is as important as the creative act itself. This initial fascination has rapidly grown into obsession that eventually took control over my life. Since the beginning of my adventure with photography, every landscape has been an unforgettable experience, thanks to which I’ve learned how to interpret light – the single most important (and the single most waited for) factor that shapes my images. On the other hand, lighting is directly connected with another key element of photography – luck. Proper weather, interesting cloud patterns or even a couple of sunrays breaking through the clouds, have many times decided that after a couple of failed attempts I was able to reach a satisfactory effect the moment nature displayed her unpredictable face.

Lately, my interests widened to cityscapes, where I pursue qualities characteristic to nature – harmony and peace. As it’s getting harder to find traits like that in our more and more hectic world, while taking pictures in the biggest European cities I had to develop the most important virtue of a photographer – patience. That’s one of the reasons why there are usually no people (or only their silhouettes) in most of my photographs. But such character of my work is also a result of other factors. Whereas taking pictures with the main focus on a person involves emotions that are relatively easy to define, depicting an empty street or portraying pulsing nature usually requires different feelings that have to fill in for the missing elements, thus making such photographs more than a simple document. – Artist Statement

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Martin Stavars : Website

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12
Jul
12

Masahisa Fukase : “The Solitude of Ravens” (Photography)

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Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII. Fukase growing up in a decade in which mannered self-control was not the ideal civic behavior. This new perspective, coupled with the effects of war, exploded into the avant-garde scene in Tokyo. Inelegant printing techniques emerged and the manic style of photography that he shared with his contemporaries, such as Eikoh Hosoe, Daidoh Moriyama, and Shomei Tomatsu, reflected the “reaction to a world turned upside down.”

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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase’s expressionist photo series on the species of ravens represents a ten-year-obsession with the dark-edged worlds of ravens, shot on annual trips from Tokyo to Hokkaido, Fukase’s birthplace. Clearly the omen of misfortune, that has been traditionally assigned to ravens in almost all cultures, reigns over the sombre photographs taken. These display isolated or massive groupings of ravens, variously appearing at night or by day throughout a diverse Japanese landscape. Sitting on telephone poles, at the beach or on the edges of villages, the ravens’ immutable and terrifying presence permeates these photographs with signs of potential, impending or sure loss. The darkened nature of the pictures might not be coincidental regarding that they were taken in a period of personal pain and suffering after the photographer’s divorce in 1976. Fukase’s works are part of the Japanese new photography that is wrenched into different forms based on the spirit of personal experience and contrasting the earlier ideal of mannered self-control [Extract : Artnet]

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Masahisa Fukase : Wirtz Gallery

Masahisa Fukase : Robert Mann Gallery

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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20
Apr
12

Paul Szynol : ‘Street Photography’ Series

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‘Natale Solum’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Thanks, Tokyo’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Here and There’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Here and There’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Natale Solum’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Here and There’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Thanks, Tokyo’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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‘Here and There’ Series
Paul Szynol
Photo
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“I look for short stories; I think they’re everywhere. Then I frame them in a way that I think is visually interesting and compelling, both in terms of form and in terms of content. Lautreamont defined beauty as “the random meeting of an umbrella and a sewing machine on an operating room table.” I think that’s what makes a good photograph too — the random meeting of form and content, caught by the photographer in a way that tells a compelling story in a compelling way. That’s what I try to do in any case. Out of all the photos I’ve taken, I think I’ve only succeeded a handful of times, but that’s my objective anyway…” ~ [ Paul Szynol : Interview – Leica Camera Blog ]

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Paul Szynol : Website

Interview : Leica Camera Blog

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29
Mar
12

Ikko Narahara : Photography

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One of the co-founders of the legendary photo agency VIVO ( Shomei Tomatsu, Eikoh Hosoe, Kikuji Kawada, and others ), which was to be the epicenter for a new generation of Japanese photographers.

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‘Hibiya’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1959
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‘Aoyama’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Shinjuku’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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Dress: Hanae Mori, Model: Hiroko Matsumoto
from the series: ‘Fashion’
silver print
1968
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‘Yurakucho’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Engraved arrow, Arizona’
‘Where Time Has Vanished’ Series
silver print
1972
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‘Shimbashi’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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In his early work Narahara focused on people who were living in isolation from the everyday world, such as monks in a Trappist monastery or the inmates of a women’s prison. His work aimed at creating a ‘personal document’, he aspired to ‘a process of laying bare the inner form by thoroughly depicting the exterior’ (Ikko Narahara). Walking a tightrope between description and abstraction, objectivity and a personal narrative, Narahara transcended the journalistic documentary photography then prevalent in Japan. Furthermore, Narahara displayed a particular facility for abstraction and the staging of everyday scenes in strict graphic compositions as in, for example, the series ‘Tokyo, the ‘50s’…

At the beginning of the 1970s Narahara went to the USA. This was the location of his best-known series ‘Where Time Has Vanished’. During extensive trips across the country he photographed the mythic sites of the American Dream, vast landscapes, Indian reservations, automobiles, motels and casinos. In contrast to fellow photographers Gary Winogrand and Robert Adams, Ikko didn’t take a critical approach to the American scene. Ikko Narahara’s work is primarily poetic with surreal elements

‘As I drove across the land in Arizona and Utah and New Mexico, I began to have hallucinations that this was not the earth at all and that I had been thrown onto some other planet…’  ~ (Ikko Narahara)

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Ikko Narahara : Galerie Priska

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09
Feb
11

Adam Magyar : “Stainless” Series (Photography)

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“In the “Stainless” series I scan rushing subway trains arriving to stations. The images record a number of tiny details of this moment. We see people staring towards their destinations standing at the doors framed by the sliding door windows. They’re scrutinizing the uncertain future. Similarly to all my images, their main motivation is arrival. The darkness of the tunnels deep below the city turns these chemically clean mock-ups into fossils of our time.” A. Magyar

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#8191
New York
231 x 80 cm
2010

#6423
Tokyo
214 x 80 cm
2010

#03621
Tokyo
197 x 80 cm
2010

#26872
Tokyo
280 x 120 cm
2010

#7649
New York
270 x 120 cm
2010

#7258
New York
180 x 80 cm
2010

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While spending extensive time in cities like Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kolkata and New York, I was getting increasingly fascinated by man-made structures. I consider all man’s scientific achievements an integral part of human evolution. So, to me the city is not less of a natural environment than the rain forest. It is an ever-present human desire to go further and leave some trace behind in the fraction of the time we are given. My drive is not different. I aim to grasp the devices at hand, push towards new frontiers by converting already existing technologies for photography in the hope of coming up with something new, a new device, a new language, a new frontier.

The factor of time is essential both in our private history and for humanity as a community. I am more interested in the drama of our own transience. In my works I capture man’s finite time in infinity. In my images I “stage” a situation where people are seen from a distance and I depict them as particles in a system. The observer of this scene is an imaginary person, looking at the whole as an outsider, as if exempt from the laws of time. I also perceive time and events taking place subjectively, consequently inappropriately. I find particular events more important than others, so I would instinctively emphasize them in my compositions. To eliminate this problem, I’m experimenting with systems that relate to reality like watches and record series of events objectively. I build digital camera systems, adopt industrial machine-vision cameras and set up script-driven post processing methods. [artist statement]

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The images above and other series can be zoomed and magnified at the link below.

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Adam Magyar : Website




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