Posts Tagged ‘surreal

08
Jul
12

Reiko Imoto : ‘Visions of The Other Side’ Series (Photography)

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These images are straight and non-staged. I used traditional 35mm camera with Tri-X 400 film,
whilst all of the images are printed as silver gelatin on 16″x 20″ Agfa classic fiber base paper.

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‘Feather’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Déjà vu’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘The Edge of a Memory’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Still Alive’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Mannequins Dream’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Vegetation’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Eclipse’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Civilisation’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Cloudy Room’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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‘Secret’
Gelatin silver prints
16 x 20 inches
2011
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These images represent surreal moments that I see in everyday life. On the street, or wherever I go, the hidden side of ordinary things attract my eye. To me, photography is a tool to expand ways of seeing the mysteries that I used to see easily when I was a little child. I am not interested in a documentation of reality, but I recognize my photography as its own imaginative reality. As adults, we are forced to face to one big reality that everybody shares in the society. Our life styles with advanced technologies have taken away the abilities to see the everyday magic.; we are too busy to play with our own inner realities. With my body of work, I have tried to collect and portray my inner reality of the subconscious world. I have never been able to use words to explain or express the unexpected feelings that I get from the visions of mysteries. My own reality takes place between the outside world and my imaginary world. I have to catch the “visions of the other side” carefully with my camera before they disappear. If we open mind’s eye widely, it is possible to see surreal moments that bring a fresh air into everyday life; poetic mysteries can be everywhere. [Artist Statement : Visions of the Other Side]

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Reiko Imoto : Website

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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04
Jul
12

Issei Suda : Photography

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‘Untitled (Sunflower)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Girl on swing)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Clouds)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kuroishi, Aomori, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Eyes and bicycles)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kanda, Tokyo, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Woman behind flowers)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Skirt)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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Issei Suda’s complex portraits and street scenes reveal his intense interest in the mysterious side of everyday life and otherworldliness. His first notable book and exhibition ‘Fushi Kaden’ (transmission of the flower of acting style} was a series based on the fifteenth-century treatise by ‘Zeami’ on the principles of ‘No theatre.’ Suda, a devout student of Zeami, translates the treatise in photographs that return to an emotional landscape that predates the rise of cities produced on his trips to remote locations in Japan from 1971 – 1978. Often his photographs are suspended in time, either one moment too soon or too late, allowing for an unsettling effect on the viewer. His fascination continues in photographic scenes remembered from days past and preserved regardless of time. His series include people who dress up for festivals, dreamlike landscapes and studies of pattern, texture and beauty. [X]

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Issei Suda : Higher Pictures

Issei Suda : Charles A Hartman

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09
May
12

Morozov Anatoly : ‘Constructions’ (Photography)

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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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‘Untitled’
Morozov Anatoly
Photograph
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Morozov Anatoly : Website

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19
Apr
12

Maite Guerrero : ‘Minuscule’ Series (Photography)

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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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‘Minuscule’ Series
100 x 70 cm
Photo
2011
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Maite Guerrero : Website

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29
Mar
12

Ikko Narahara : Photography

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One of the co-founders of the legendary photo agency VIVO ( Shomei Tomatsu, Eikoh Hosoe, Kikuji Kawada, and others ), which was to be the epicenter for a new generation of Japanese photographers.

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‘Hibiya’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1959
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‘Aoyama’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Shinjuku’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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Dress: Hanae Mori, Model: Hiroko Matsumoto
from the series: ‘Fashion’
silver print
1968
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‘Yurakucho’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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‘Engraved arrow, Arizona’
‘Where Time Has Vanished’ Series
silver print
1972
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‘Shimbashi’
‘Tokyo the ’50s’ series
silver print
1954-1958
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In his early work Narahara focused on people who were living in isolation from the everyday world, such as monks in a Trappist monastery or the inmates of a women’s prison. His work aimed at creating a ‘personal document’, he aspired to ‘a process of laying bare the inner form by thoroughly depicting the exterior’ (Ikko Narahara). Walking a tightrope between description and abstraction, objectivity and a personal narrative, Narahara transcended the journalistic documentary photography then prevalent in Japan. Furthermore, Narahara displayed a particular facility for abstraction and the staging of everyday scenes in strict graphic compositions as in, for example, the series ‘Tokyo, the ‘50s’…

At the beginning of the 1970s Narahara went to the USA. This was the location of his best-known series ‘Where Time Has Vanished’. During extensive trips across the country he photographed the mythic sites of the American Dream, vast landscapes, Indian reservations, automobiles, motels and casinos. In contrast to fellow photographers Gary Winogrand and Robert Adams, Ikko didn’t take a critical approach to the American scene. Ikko Narahara’s work is primarily poetic with surreal elements

‘As I drove across the land in Arizona and Utah and New Mexico, I began to have hallucinations that this was not the earth at all and that I had been thrown onto some other planet…’  ~ (Ikko Narahara)

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Ikko Narahara : Galerie Priska

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