Posts Tagged ‘superimposed

03
Oct
10

Zaha Hadid : MAXXI National Museum of XXI Century Arts

The MAXXI National Museum of XXI Century Arts by Zaha Hadid Architects has won this
year’s RIBA Stirling Prize for the greatest contribution to British architecture in the past year.

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

Architect : Zaha Hadid
MAXXI National Museum
XXI Century Arts
Rome

“An interesting thing about the museum in Rome is that it is no longer an object, but rather a field, which implies that many programs could be attached to the museum. It’s no longer a museum, but a center. Here we are weaving a dense texture of interior and exterior spaces. It’s an intriguing mixture of permanent, temporary and commercial galleries, irrigating a large urban field with linear display surfaces. It could be a library; there are so many buildings that are not standing next to, but are intertwined and superimposed over one another. This means that, through the organizational diagram, you could weave other programs into the whole idea of gallery spaces. You can make connections between architecture and art – the bridges can connect them and make them into one exhibition. That gives you the interesting possibility of having an exhibition across the field. You can walk through a whole segment of a city to view spaces. In Rome, the organization will allow you to have exhibitions across the field, but they can also be very compressed, so you have a great variety.” Zaha Hadid

[Extract : Dezeen]

MAXXI : Website

Zaha Hadid : Website

Photographer : Luke Hayes

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21
Sep
10

Jenny Okun : Photography

Bergamot White Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Morphosis Beverly Building Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1988

Getty Shadows Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Getty Terrace Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Carmy House Floor Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1995

Okun records architectural structures through multiple exposures. Using a large-format Hasselblad camera, she takes a picture, then advances the film only slightly to achieve a layering effect. A single image may comprise six such overlays, which might then become part of a triptych. Okun’s background is in film, so it follows that the spatial information unfolds sequentially; the images are fragmented and superimposed, causing unexpectedly lyrical interpretations of buildings and space to emerge.

Yet for all their abstraction, what is also compelling about these images is their essentially traditional approach to the documentation of architecture. These days, architectural photography tends to consider circumstances beyond the built form:- climate, use, landscape, and human accessibility — to position the building in its social and environmental context. Okun, however, sticks to the structural facts; her images read as formal records and revelations of space, form, color, and light.

[Extract : Metropolis Magazine, May 1996 : Harmonious Fragments By Akiko Busch]

Craig Krull Gallery

Jenny Okun : Website

Kashya Hildebrand Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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