Posts Tagged ‘sublime

16
Sep
11

Stephen Holding : Ryoji Ikeda – The Transfinite (Installation)

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“As an artist/composer, my intention is polarized by concepts of the “beautiful” and the “sublime”.

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“To me, beauty is crystal: rationality, precision, simplicity, elegance, delicacy; the sublime is infinity: infinitesimal, immensity, indescribable, ineffable. To me, the purest beauty is the world of mathematics. Its perfect assemblage of numbers, magnitudes and forms persist, independent of us. The aesthetic experience of the sublime in mathematics is awe-inspiring. It is similar to the experience we have when we confront the vast magnitude of the universe, which always leaves us open-mouthed.

As a composer/artist, I compose music, visuals, materials, physical phenomena and abstract concepts. For this project, the invisible multi-substance of data is the subject of my composition. Three large-scale audiovisual installations are re-orchestrated into a single, symphonic work as the transfinite. This project explores the transfinite (the infinite that is quantitative and ordered) intersection that lies between such polarizations—the beautiful and the sublime; music and mathematics; performance and installation; composer and visual artist; black and white; 0s and 1s.”  Ryoji Ikeda

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Ryoji Ikeda : Website

Stephen Holding : Vimeo

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30
Nov
10

Dan Holdsworth : ‘Blackout’ Series (Photography)

Blackout 17
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

Blackout 07
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

Blackout 13
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

Blackout 08
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

Blackout 12
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

Blackout 01
C-type print
226 x 177 cm
2010

‘Blackout’, presented at BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art from Friday 12 November, brings together a remarkable new sequence of images taken in Iceland by British photographer Dan Holdsworth.

Occupying a space between documentary and the make-believe, these photographs, reproduced to a grand scale, transform the elemental terrain of giant Icelandic glaciers as they melt away into a strange, futuristic landscape. Blackout’s awe-striking photographs appear so otherworldly it is almost impossible to believe that these lunar-style landscapes actually exist.

The blue of the sky becomes the deep black of space, while the earth appears in negative, beyond imaginable human time and space. Reconstructing the notion of the romantic sublime for the 21st century, Holdsworth’s practice is consumed with investigating the unknown: pushing the peripheries of time, space, and consciousness beyond the limits of ordinary perception.

Since the late 90s, Holdsworth has developed a reputation as one of the most innovative British photographers currently working with landscape. While his early series concentrate on the quiet moments in everyday spaces: office buildings after work, car parks at night and deserted motorway flyovers his most recent work, as captured in Blackout, explore the natural world defining a modern spiritualism and a humbling reminder of the scope of things yet undiscovered.

[Extract : Dan Holdsworth – Exhibitions]

Dan Holdsworth : Projects

06
Jul
10

Mark Rothko : Red Abstracts

Mark Rothko. Orange, Red, Orange. Oil on paper.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. White stripe. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Mauve and Orange. Oil on canvas.

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York School, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting. Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained:

“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.”

Mark Rothko Web Feature




Ai : Series : Photography Book

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By Azurebumble

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