Posts Tagged ‘sombre

12
Jul
12

Masahisa Fukase : “The Solitude of Ravens” (Photography)

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Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII. Fukase growing up in a decade in which mannered self-control was not the ideal civic behavior. This new perspective, coupled with the effects of war, exploded into the avant-garde scene in Tokyo. Inelegant printing techniques emerged and the manic style of photography that he shared with his contemporaries, such as Eikoh Hosoe, Daidoh Moriyama, and Shomei Tomatsu, reflected the “reaction to a world turned upside down.”

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“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
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::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

::
“The Solitude of Ravens”
Gelatin silver print
Masahisa Fukase
16 x 20″
::

Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase’s expressionist photo series on the species of ravens represents a ten-year-obsession with the dark-edged worlds of ravens, shot on annual trips from Tokyo to Hokkaido, Fukase’s birthplace. Clearly the omen of misfortune, that has been traditionally assigned to ravens in almost all cultures, reigns over the sombre photographs taken. These display isolated or massive groupings of ravens, variously appearing at night or by day throughout a diverse Japanese landscape. Sitting on telephone poles, at the beach or on the edges of villages, the ravens’ immutable and terrifying presence permeates these photographs with signs of potential, impending or sure loss. The darkened nature of the pictures might not be coincidental regarding that they were taken in a period of personal pain and suffering after the photographer’s divorce in 1976. Fukase’s works are part of the Japanese new photography that is wrenched into different forms based on the spirit of personal experience and contrasting the earlier ideal of mannered self-control [Extract : Artnet]

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Masahisa Fukase : Wirtz Gallery

Masahisa Fukase : Robert Mann Gallery

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25
Nov
11

Laurent Millet : ‘Les Monolithes’ Series (Photography)

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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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‘Les Monolithes’
chromogenic dye print
20 x 24 in
2002
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The 2002 photography series ‘Les Monolithes’ is dark and imposing. To create it, Millet returned to the shoreline with pitch-black squarish shapes resting in the water. “I was looking for very minimalistic shapes,” he says, “that could be seen, on the one hand, as almost three-dimensional, and on the other hand, like a black hole in the picture.” The images were inspired by Richard Serra’s engravings, but he also had in mind the history of the beaches at Normandy, where the Canadians tried to disembark during World War II but were killed because their boats couldn’t land on the rocky shore.

“In my imagination,” says Millet, “I was seeing these engines, half-covered by the water, like geometric shapes.” It’s not necessary to know what he was thinking when he made these pictures to feel they have a somber quality. And yet there is a delicacy about them too, in the irregularity of their outside lines, and in the flimsiness of the shapes themselves. “I have a strong necessity to build things,” he says, “but now my constructions have become faster and lighter.” [Extract : Robert Mann Gallery]

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Laurent Millet : Photography

Laurent Millet : Cargo

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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