Posts Tagged ‘silence

14
Jul
13

Robert Adams :: Photography

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Are there affirmable days or places in our deteriorating world? Are there scenes in life, right now, for which we might conceivably be thankful? Is there a basis for joy or serenity, even if felt only occasionally? Are there grounds now and then for an unironic smile?” ~ Robert Adams

For four decades Adams has photographed the changing landscape of the American West, finding there a fragile beauty that endures despite our troubled relationship with nature, and with ourselves. His photos are distinguished not only by their economy and lucidity, but also by their mixture of grief and hope. [Ext]

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‘Colorado Springs, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘A backyard, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1968
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‘The New West series’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Pikes Peak, Colorado Springs’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1979
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‘Eden, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1969
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‘Longmont, Colorado’
Robert Adams
photograph
1976-1982
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‘Untitled’
Robert Adams
photograph
1978
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Robert Adams was born in New Jersey in 1937. He was a professor of English literature for several years before turning his full attention to photography in the mid 1970s. His work is largely concerned with moments of regional transition: the suburbanization of Denver, a changing Los Angeles of the 1970s and 1980s, and the clear-cutting in Oregon in the 1990s. His many books, well-known to those concerned with the American Landscape, include The New West, From the Missouri West, Summer Nights, Los Angeles Spring, To Make It Home, Listening to the River, West From the Columbia, What We Bought, Notes for Friends, California, Summer Nights, Walking, What Can We Believe Where? and The Place We Live. [Ext]

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Robert Adams :: The Place We Live

Robert Adams :: Fraenkel Gallery

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26
Aug
12

Mårten Lange : “Anomalies” Series (Photography)

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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“Untitled”
Mårten Lange
Photograph
2009
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“There is an optimal size of things,” Mårten Lange says. Lange believes in the power of the index. When viewed in sequence, his stark, black-and-white photographs of both natural and manmade phenomena resemble a meticulously assembled catalogue of objects whose common quality remains tantalizingly obscure, despite the undeniable sense that they are, somehow, related. Lange’s work underscores photography’s empiricism, its liberation from the subjectivity of other media. In his work, form is stripped of meaning and allowed to stand unadorned, ready for contemplation. Lange explains, “You’ve got this lens, which sees everything, but it understands nothing.” Perhaps his best-known work is Anomalies, his third self-published book. The format of the photos in Anomalies is very strict: all the images are squares (that most static and inert shape) with an object centered in the composition…

Shot in Sweden and Japan, the images in Anomalies are deliberately de-contextualized. Lange notes. “It’s not about a place. If you leave the place out of the story, the images can take on different weights. Places are really loud.” The objects that populate Anomalies, on the other hand, are suffused with a deep, seemingly impenetrable silence. Lange photographed most of the images in Anomalies with a medium format camera equipped with a large Metz flash that he hoped would help combat the inky darkness of the long Swedish winter. It had an even more powerful effect, he recalls. “The whole town became my studio,” he says. In many of the images in Anomalies, the harsh blanket of light effectively cleaves figure from ground, and a scalelessness pervades. An overturned bus, an origami crane, and a distant house could all be the same size, and all resonate with an uncanny strangeness…

Lange’s early interest in photography had more to do with the equipment than the images it could yield. “I was fixated on the machine,” he recalls. As a boy, he visited his grandfather, who had a darkroom in his basement. Lange took photographs of small birds amid the Swedish landscape using his grandfather’s telephoto lens. Traces of those early experiments remain in his current work, which resonates with the power of a focal object emerging from a scanned void. “Complexity resembles chaos,” Lange notes, adding, “Like reverse science, I’m creating the kind of evidence I need to prove my point.” Anomalies has in fact been compared to Mike Mandel and Larry Sultan’s seminal Evidence (1977), which similarly strips the context from the images it indexes. – [Extract : The Last Magazine #8]

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Mårten Lange : Website

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16
Jul
12

Martin Usborne : “MUTE: the silence of dogs in cars” Series

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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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“Dogs in Cars” Series
Martin Usborne
Photograph
2010
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I was once left in a car at a young age. I don’t know when or where or for how long, possibly at the age of four, perhaps outside Tesco’s, probably for fifteen minutes only. The details don’t matter. The point is that I wondered if anyone would come back. It seems trivial now but in a child’s mind it is possible to be alone forever. Around the same age I began to feel a deep affinity with animals – in particular their plight at the hands of humans. I remember watching television and seeing footage of a dog being put in a plastic bag and being kicked. What appalled me most was that the dog could not speak back. It’s muteness absolutely terrified me. I should say that I was a well-loved child and never abandoned and yet it is quite clear that both these experiences arose from the same place deep inside me: a fear of being alone and unheard. Perhaps this is a fear we all share on some level, I am not sure.

The images in this series explore that feeling, both in relation to myself and to animals in general. The camera is the perfect tool for capturing a sense of silence and longing: the shutter freezes the subject for ever and two layers of glass are placed between the viewer and the viewed: the glass of the lens, the glass of the picture frame and, in this instance, the glass of the car window further isolates the animal. The dog is truly trapped. When I started this project I knew the photos would be dark. What I didn’t expect was to see so many subtle reactions by the dogs: some sad, some expectant, some angry, some dejected. It was as if upon opening up a box of grey-coloured pencils I was surprised to see so many shades inside. I hope that these pictures are engaging and perhaps a little amusing. I want to show that there is life in the dark places within us. I will stop writing now and you can stop reading. Words can only get us so far. After all, we are all animals. – Martin Usborne, September, 2010.

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Martin Usborne : Website

The Making of ‘Dogs in Cars’ : Vimeo

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25
Apr
12

George Ramms : ‘Long Exposures’ Series (Photography)

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‘My passion is to capture the world around us in a way that reduces the object to its true appearance, with photographs of ordinary subjects enhanced by lines, contrasts and light, or absence of it.’ ~ G.R

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‘Diving Platform’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Swiss Lake’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Before Season’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Fish Trap’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Venice Morning’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Viewing Balcony’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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‘Baywatch Tower’
George Ramms
Photograph
2011
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By using long exposures, George Ramms directs the viewers attention to the still object of the picture. Things and places that are not obvious, or even mostly ignored to be photographed, unveil their beauty in monochrome pictures with a smooth skin of light. Jetties, stones and rocks stand out among the constantly moving environment and disclose a powerful silence. [ Extract : George Ramms – About ]

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George Ramms : Website

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29
Sep
10

Friederike von Rauch : Photography

Friederike von Rauch
Gent #20
Pigment print
2009

Friederike von Rauch
Berlin #5
C-print mounted on aluminium
2002

Friederike von Rauch
Brussels #2
C-print mounted on aluminium
2006

Friederike von Rauch
Brussels #6
C-print mounted on aluminium
2006

Friederike von Rauch
Dienerkammer #3
Pigment print
2008

Friederike von Rauch photographs buildings. A complete building or merely a detail. The building on its own, or within its surroundings. The interior or the exterior. Her photographs are meticulously stylized. The framing and the angle are chosen with care. She describes herself as an intuitive photographer. Her work is not so much about buildings. It’s about spaces. She looks for spots that to her are exceptional, but that most people walk by without even a glance.

In her photographs the silence is the first thing that strikes you. The silence, however, does not equal quiet. There is a tension to the silence. This tension grows from the absence of people; despite the unbreakable link between buildings and human beings. Buildings are made by people and are used by them. The lack of a human presence deprives the buildings of their functionality. The buildings in her photographs are no longer buildings, but monumental sculptures. [Extract : Gallery 51]

Friederike von Rauch : Website

Kunstagenten Gallery

Fifty One




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