Posts Tagged ‘self

13
May
12

FUTURE SELF : Project Film

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FUTURE SELF studies human movement, mirroring interaction in dance, light and sound, while exploring the self, present and future. Bringing together a media artist collective, rAndom International, a choreographer, Wayne McGregor, and a composer, Max Richter in a unique interdisciplinary clash at MADE. The FUTURE SELF Project Film documents the creative working process, which began in London, England, continued in Berlin, Germany and culminated in three wonderful performances at MADE. Vimeo

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11
May
12

Graham Gillmore : Paintings (Works on Panel)

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‘Sunset Applause’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 60 in
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‘Answers To The Questions To The Answers’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘After You’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Trash the Planet’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 72 in
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‘Damp Wounds Sorely Mist’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
90 X 72 in
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‘Don’t be so Naive’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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‘Wash Away Yovr Tears’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
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The nature of my project has never been about boiling anything down, but rather exposing the complexities of human experience; particularly one’s self as subject and the world as object. The ‘self’ and the ‘other’ play a pivotal role as subject matter within my manipulations with language – locating, defining and ultimately obscuring any kind of singular ‘meaning’ behind or beneath the surfaces of the world. These games (self imploding sentences, misreadings , backfirings revisions, second thoughts etc.) offer access to the hope for authentic – if flawed – communication while confronting the indeterminacy of language, both literary and abstract. I use these self-conscious devices for a ‘defamiliarizing’ effect. Text allows the work to maintain a narrative thread while maintaining an allegiance to non-figurative imagery. I play the role of scavenger when it comes to the texts I use. I think of these selected fragments as a kind of linguistic ‘road kill’ – skeletons on which to hang the material of the painting. I am engaged with texts that evoke a certain prickliness or an emotional angle that is slightly askew, with an emphasis on themes rooted in an emotional or psychological realm rather than intellect. Sensation overides thought, just as fantasy takes the place of history. Statement

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Graham Gillmore : Monte Clark Gallery

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 1)

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Friedlander began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. His photographs bring to the surface the juxtapositions of everyday life that comprise our modern world. Beyond the vigorous outward eye he turns to the world around him, Lee is also recognized for his investigation of the self.

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Lee Friedlander is internationally recognized as one of America’s most important contemporary photographers. In the 1960’s his silver print photographs, described as “open-ended alternatives to normal seeing,” provided a shockingly new aesthetic of asymmetrical and fragmented images of the United States. Lacking defined borders and layered with a disjointed profusion of architectural and advertising elements, his photographs were visually equivalent to the broken, improvisational rhythms of jazz. Working within the tradition of Eugene Atget, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Robert Frank, Lee was one of the first modern photographers to portray the “social landscape” of America as a complex mixture of order and chaos, warmth and alienation, refinement, and commercialism. [Extract]

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Lee Friedlander : Atget Photography

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 2)

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Friedlander often included oblique references to himself by including his own reflection or shadow in the photographs. – “I suspect it’s for one’s self-interest that one looks at one’s surroundings and one’s self. This search is personally borne and is indeed my reason and motive for making photographs.”

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Lee Friedlander’s unique vision underscores the two-dimensionality of the picture plane and the potential for photographs to contain varying levels of reflection, opacity, and transparency. Like Atget’s photographs, Friedlander’s images of shop windows evoke a certain ambiguity, an oscillation between reflected and actual reality, that invite inspection of the space and the meaning of the image. Similar responses are encouraged by Friedlander’s street photographs, in which shadows of figures (usually Friedlander himself) and other subjects overlap in the photographic image. The projected outline of Friedlander’s body as within the picture frame implies the notion that the photographer can be both behind the camera and in front of it. Interpreted further, Friedlander’s shadow can be taken to represent the imposition of the photographer upon his world and his subject. [Extract : MoCP]

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Lee Friedlander : MoMA

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19
Oct
11

Hyunmee Lee : Paintings

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Life is about discovering our own identity. – Hyunmee Lee

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“My art practice crosses three continents over two decades. The works consider the images and ideas that mark my journey into the spiritual and cultural dimensions of painting as a creative activity. During a period when I have carried adventurous journeys across several different social and geographic divides, I began to search deeper for an understanding of who I am, and where I am. My paintings started to explore the idea of self as the most fundamental element of human nature; I tried to seek my identity as I examined human nature.

In the 80s by moving outside my Korean heritage, I became more aware of the traditions of thought that formed the basis of my life and work. I reflected on Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism: these are the principles of natural energy in my painting. In Taoism, the main concept is being in the middle, not being judgmental, and bringing forth spontaneously. It reflects my art process of meditation as an “abstract gaze”, which is a certain way of looking and thinking that prioritizes states of formlessness and energy (ch’i). For me, ch’i is the life force that animates and connects things. The resulting energy, or ch’I, helped to explore the idea of self.

The repetition of seeking a harmony between the conscious and unconscious mind is how I destruct the existing order to make formless space, I try to keep the rhythm continuous. This is where I find my creative mind; “In the immediacy of gesture,” especially the “moment when the gesture finds its own power.” As I have always been more interested in the substance of the brush stroke than its symbolism; I am concentrating on spontaneous gestures. At this time in my life, while I am not connected to the outside world, I have chosen to create a world of my own, where I can find the inspiration I am looking for. I find these moments of ‘making-earth’ at the time when the gesture finds its own power…” Hyunmee Lee

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Hyunmee Lee : Website

Hyunmee Lee : Cheryl Hazan Gallery

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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