Posts Tagged ‘scale

30
Nov
12

James Bourret : “Winter’s Veil” Series (Photography)

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“I seek to create richly evocative, emotional images from nature,
reflecting the mood, form, colors, and patterns of a scene.” J Bourret

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‘Winter’s Veil’ #10
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #26
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #28
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #27
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #2
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #7
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #6
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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‘Winter’s Veil’ #44
Giclée Print
8 x 10″
2009
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The water’s edge has been a source of fascination for me since I can remember. The changing landscape, the effects of current and water volume, light, and temperature all make the river’s edge different from day to day. Seasonal progression brings further changes, with winter bringing the growing and changing veil of ice along the bank, increasing until the surface is solid. Even then, the ice changes in shape and transparency on a daily basis, thinning, clearing, cracking, buckling, melting and freezing again, and eventually moving tectonically downstream.

These highly abstract images seek to transcend boundaries of formal and scale recognition. Flowing lines and curved forms in the ice are interrupted by spiky, angular forms and layered textures. The seemingly random crystalline forms and structures evoke associations with landforms (aerial photography) and microcrystalline structures (photomicrography) and leave room for endless possibilities of interpretation. Therefore, as a photographer, they offer the opportunity to find and make strongly graphic yet highly detailed, rich images. [artist statement]

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James Bourret : Portfolio

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21
Nov
11

Mattia Listowski : ‘Shorescape’ (Video & Stills)

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“My work analyses the creative process and the objects emerging from it. The time involved in this process is important when we observe these objects because time is slowed down in an accelerating world, warning us of our fragility and the contempt we bear for it. It is also the unpredictable emergence caused by creation: the result evolves with time. The probability of the unpredictable is a crucial element in the quality of the process, and is what makes it beautiful.”

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Shorescape
‘Perceptive Landscapes’
Digital Print
2010
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Shorescape
‘Perceptive Landscapes’
Digital Print
2010
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Shorescape
‘Perceptive Landscapes’
Digital Print
2010
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Shorescape
‘Perceptive Landscapes’
Digital Print
2010
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Flatlight Shorescape
Video
2010

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When someone is confronted by a natural phenomenon, which is alive and moving, the first though we have to understand this phenomenon is to associate it with a similar element representing something real, sometimes on a different scale, and most of the time that first impression is the one that permeates memory. Unless you have a need to go further, the viewer is held and stick to it.

‘Shorescape’ attempts to provide directly the second reading, the one that reveals a different reality than that offered by the model. By showing photographs of a selected event perceived as a moving one, the image reveals a figurative element invisible at the first reading. [Extract : Shorescape]

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Mattia Listowski : Website

Mattia Listowski : Vimeo

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07
Jul
10

Richard Serra : Sculpture : Forty Years

Band, 2006

Sequence, 2006

Sequence, 2006

Band, 2006

Band, 2006

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Torqued Torus Inversion, 2006.

Serra graduated from Yale University’s School of Art and Architecture in 1964, where he was primarily trained as a painter. After two years in Europe he started working as a sculptor; living in New York in 1966 he started to use non-traditional materials and techniques to transform traditional definitions of the genre. From his casts of rubber he moved onto metal, at one point even throwing spoonfuls of molten lead against a wall in a warehouse to not just create an object, but to create it through a very distinct, deliberate kind of action, an idea of process which he continued exploring through his subsequent ‘Verb List’ from 1967-8, playful prop pieces (such as ‘One Ton Prop – house of cards’ from 1969) and eventual larger transformations of existing space with his signature standing steel pieces.

I went straight for one of the most striking three new pieces specially made for the show – ‘Band’ from 2006 – letting my feet take me in and out of curves that always looked familiar yet endlessly new despite having seen the floorplan several times, and suddenly felt dizzy with perspectival vertigo (not just from the chanting), constantly thinking about that oft-quoted bit where Serra talks about a pivotal moment in his life, visiting his father working in a shipyard and seeing the large steel works hanging over his head as if about to fall. There’s a lot of steel hanging over your head at this show, whether it is a teetering curving wall or a slab of it attached to the ceiling (with something stronger than superglue i kept telling myself), and at times it can all feel a little claustrophobic, in contrast with his open-air works, but somehow at some point you forget about any sense of danger and become totally humbled and mesmerised with the beauty of aging texture, the artist’s revolutionary decision to present sculpture directly on walls and the ground bypassing pedestals still aglow with possibility, his ongoing, quest for always different, deeper and more abstract spatial experiences winning more converts by initiation. [extract : Lupe Nunez-Fernandez : Saatchi Gallery]

Richard Serra : Sculpture : Forty Years : MoMa Interactive

Video : A conversation with artist Richard Serra : Part 1

Video : A conversation with artist Richard Serra : Part 2




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