Posts Tagged ‘‘reality’

02
Aug
12

Isa Leshko : ‘Thrills & Chills’ (Photography Series)

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“Bracing for the Fall”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Girl on Tilt-a-Whirl”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Point Pleasant, NJ #1”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Offering to the Gods”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Pirate Ship, Topsfield Fair, MA”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Swing Ride at the Big E”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Among the Trees”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“The Wave”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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“Coaster at Dusk, Hershey Park, PA”
Gelatin silver print
Isa Leshko
2009
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Amusement park rides terrify me, which is why I began photographing them. I am fascinated by what compels people to surrender themselves to these mechanical beasts. The rides seem to challenge the very limitations of being human. We can’t fly; yet these vertigo-inducing machines allow us to soar through the open air. The experience combines elation with fear; thrills with chills. These images explore the fantastic and sinister place these rides hold in my imagination. With some of these images, I suspend disbelief and embrace the underlying fantasies of these rides. With other images, I examine the tensions that exist between fantasy and reality. I am interested in exploring the range of emotions—from anger to shock to exultation—that people exhibit in pursuit of the amusement these rides are supposed to provide. I create these images with a Holga camera to provide them with a vernacular feel and a sense of immediacy. The camera’s plastic lens distorts the scale of these rides, particularly when they are photographed against an open sky. I also find working with such an imprecise and flawed camera to be a frightening and liberating experience, akin to being on a roller coaster. Artist Statement

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Isa Leshko : Website

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30
Jul
12

Daido Moriyama : Photography Series

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“For me, photography is not a means by which to create beautiful art,
but a unique way of encountering genuine reality” ~ Daido Moriyama

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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.15”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Northern 3”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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“Record No.18”
Daido Moriyama
Photograph
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Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan’s leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence, strange worlds, and unusual characters, his work occupies a unique space between the objective and the subjective, the illusory and the real. Moriyama’s use of a small hand held automatic camera gives his images a loose and casual aesthetic, undermined by a forceful and decisive point of view. – Extract : Luhring Augustine

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Daido Moriyama : Website

Daido Moriyama : Luhring Augustine

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21
Apr
12

Ward Roberts : ‘Billions’ Series (Photography)

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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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‘Billions’ Series
Ward Roberts
Photography
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One may find the concepts explored in Ward Roberts’ Billions series confronting, given that the images within this series represent a fast-forming reality, predicted to be the dystopian future not so long ago. But the present is never perceived as the future we envisaged in the past. We move along the arrrow of time as stationary observers, watching the world transform before our very eyes, yet rarely aware of our transition into ‘the future’.

Billions removes us from this stationary reality for a brief moment, lifting us to the surface for air. From this detached place, these images allow us to see our world, yet we feel neither comfortable nor uncomfortable about it. We find the challenges of cognitive mapping, the loss of individualism, that theorists like Fredric Jameson were concerned with. But we seem not to feel alarm.

Perhaps we have evolved along with our ideas, with our effects on the world and its dynamic entropy. Our minds have unconsciously integrated what was, through past eyes, a forecast of chaos. In our times, the concept of a billion no longer overwhelms us. As these photographs show us, we can stay solid and identify connectedness between floating transparencies. We now recognize a new kind of whole. It’s work that allows you to recognize your world and your place within it that is truly effective. x

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Ward Roberts : Website

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05
Feb
12

Felice Varini : Site-Specific Installations (Paintings)

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‘Ellipse in red trapezoid’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Trapezoid in red ellipse’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2008
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‘Red ellipse for the window’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1995
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‘Eight eccentric circles No.1’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1998
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‘Three red triangles’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2001
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‘Ellipse on two points’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
1997
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‘Ellipse with six circular holes’
Site-specific installation
Felice Varini
2000
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“My field of action is architectural space and everything that constitutes such space These spaces are and remain the original media for my painting. I work “on site” each time in a different space and my work develops itself in relation to the spaces I encounter. I generally roam through the space noting its architecture, materials, history and function. From these spatial data and in reference to the last piece I produced, I designate a specific vantage point for viewing from which my intervention takes shape.

The vantage point is carefully chosen: it is generally situated at my eye level and located preferably along an inevitable route, for instance an aperture between one room and another, a landing… I do not, however, make a rule out of this, for all spaces do not systematically possess an evident line. It is often an arbitrary choice. The vantage point will function as a reading point, that is to say, as a potential starting point to approaching painting and space.

The painted form achieves its coherence when the viewer stands at the vantage point.When he moves out of it, the work meets with space generating infinite vantage points on the form. It is not therefore through this original vantage point that I see the work achieved; it takes place in the set of vantage points the viewer can have on it. If I establish a particular relation to architectural features that influence the installation shape, my work still preserves its independence whatever architectural spaces I encounter. I start from an actual situation to construct my painting. Reality is never altered, erased or modified, it interests and seduces me in its complexity. I work “here and now”. – Felice Varini

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Felice Varini : Website

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29
Jan
12

Matthieu Gafsou : Photography Series

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‘La Chaux-De-Fonds Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Extime Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Extime Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Ordinaires Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Ordinaires Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Ordinaires Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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‘Extime Series’
Matthieu Gafsou
Photograph
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Photography always implies a relationship between a body – the man with a camera – and the world. Even today, photographic gear remains heavy and cumbersome, an impediment. Landscapes, too, are related to the body: we are wandering somewhere about the world when suddenly, without any perceivable signal, reality emerges with force and becomes an image. Landscapes, wherever one might be, are disorienting. In front of a landscape, we are no longer somewhere. A landscape imposes itself through over exposition, through endless scrutinizing.

For a photographer, the hardest thing to convey is the outburst of reality. The emerging of an image, as opposed to its emergence, which would imply the existence of further development. Paradoxically, the burden of the gear and the mass of the body act as a means of access; only through effort can this first impact, this moment of dawning, be impressed onto film. Matthieu Gafsou’s pictures constantly bring us that exact moment when the image happens. [Extract : About the indefinite by Michael Jakob]

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Matthieu Gafsou : Website

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13
Dec
11

Lee Friedlander : Photography (Sequence 1)

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Friedlander began photographing the American social landscape in 1948. His photographs bring to the surface the juxtapositions of everyday life that comprise our modern world. Beyond the vigorous outward eye he turns to the world around him, Lee is also recognized for his investigation of the self.

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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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lee friedlander
photograph
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Lee Friedlander is internationally recognized as one of America’s most important contemporary photographers. In the 1960’s his silver print photographs, described as “open-ended alternatives to normal seeing,” provided a shockingly new aesthetic of asymmetrical and fragmented images of the United States. Lacking defined borders and layered with a disjointed profusion of architectural and advertising elements, his photographs were visually equivalent to the broken, improvisational rhythms of jazz. Working within the tradition of Eugene Atget, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Robert Frank, Lee was one of the first modern photographers to portray the “social landscape” of America as a complex mixture of order and chaos, warmth and alienation, refinement, and commercialism. [Extract]

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Lee Friedlander : Atget Photography

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