Posts Tagged ‘psychological

17
Jul
12

Eikoh Hosoe : Photography Series

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“To me photography can be simultaneously a record and a ‘mirror’ or ‘window’ of self-expression. The camera is generally assumed to be unable to depict that which is not visible to the eye. And yet the photographer who wields it well can depict what lies unseen in his memory…” ~ Eikoh Hosoe

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“Man and Woman #31”
gelatin silver print
32.4 x 45.1 cm
1960
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“Kamaitachi #11”
gelatin silver print
32.4 x 45.1 cm
1965
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“Ordeal By Roses #16”
gelatin silver print
30.5 x 45.1 cm
1961
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“Kamaitachi #19”
gelatin silver print
32.4 x 45.1 cm
1965
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“Kamaitachi #17”
gelatin silver print
29.9 x 45.4 cm
1965
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“Kamaitachi #23”
gelatin silver print
30.4 x 45.3 cm
1965
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“Ordeal By Roses #6”
gelatin silver print
30.0 x 45.1 cm
1961
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Eikoh Hosoe is one of Japan’s most notable post-war photographers and film-makers. Hosoe was born in 1933 in Yamagata prefecture, as Toshihio Hosoe. He changed his name to Eikoh after the Second World War, to symbolize the new Japan he was photographing. Hosoe’s photography is often collaborative or linked to one of his artist acquaintances. The series ‘Bara-kei’ (Ordeal by Roses) was created in 1962 with the famous writer Yukio Mishima as a model, and the 1969 series ‘Kamaitachi’ was created with dancer Tatsumi Hijikata as the model. Hosoe has also been a part of many artist groups and co-operations like Demokrato, VIVO, and Jazz Film Laboratory, which he founded. [Extract : M.H.G.]

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Article : Utata

Eikoh Hosoe : Clair Gallery

Eikoh Hosoe : Toki-No-Wasuremono

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05
Jul
12

Shomei Tomatsu : Photography

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‘Untitled’ (Hateruma-jima, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
25 x 37.7 cm
1971
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‘Protest Series, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Kadena, Okinawa)
Gelatin silver print
29 x 41.3 cm
1969
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‘Steel Helmet, Nagasaki’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1963
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‘Coca-Cola, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
29.7 x 39.1 cm
1969
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‘Hairstyle, Tokyo’
Gelatin silver print
Shomei Tomatsu
1969
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‘Untitled’ (Eros Series)
Gelatin silver print
31 x 23 cm
1969
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Though still relatively unknown outside Japan, Tomatsu, is arguably the greatest and most influential of all the photographers that emerged during his country’s turbulent postwar era. Over a span of 50 years, his work has reflected, often obliquely, the changes in Japanese culture as the American military presence and then the unstoppable spread of American popular culture, helped shaped a new outward-looking, consumer-driven nation. Two series of photographs – Protest, Tokyo, 1969 and Eros, Tokyo, 1969 – record the often turbulent youth cultural changes of the time. His book, Oh! Shinjuku, named after a shopping district in central Tokyo, chronicles the rise of a young and rebellious Bohemianism that, as an older outsider, he saw, as he later put it – “through the eyes of a stray dog.”

Those words seem prophetic. Tomatsu was one of the giants of Japanese photography that a younger generation of photographers who came to prominence in the late 60s reacted against. Known as the Provoke Movement, after the magazine that published their work, it included Daido Moriyama, Takuma Nakahira and Koji Taki. In its founding statement of intent, Taki wrote: “We photographers must use our own eyes to grasp fragments of reality far beyond the reach of pre-existing language, presenting materials that actively oppose words and ideas … materials to provoke thought.” Forty years on, though, Tomatsu’s radical approach – his freeform, expressionist style, odd camera angles, strange cropping and framing – has been reappraised and he is now seen, ironically enough, as one of the pioneers of the Provoke era. He is famously reclusive and has never ventured outside Japan. [ Extract ]

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Shomei Tomatsu : Galerie Priska Pasquer

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07
Jan
12

Kristina Lerner : ‘Isolation’ Series (Photography)

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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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‘Isolation’ Series
Kristina Lerner
Photograph
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Any series – are, in one way or another, the reflection of the author’s personal experience. For the past couple of months I very rarely left the house, when I did it was only at night when I went to work or in case of an urgent matter. I did not answer the phone and rarely checked my e-mails. Most of the time was spent attempting to answer the questions which had accumulated over the past years.

Everything surrounding us today is progressively becoming faster; gaining momentum with each day the superfluous amount of information is becoming more unbearable to withhold; it forces a man to retreat inside, to close off, to seek confinement within himself as a kind of temporary relief — a Psychological Isolation, if you may.

In creating these series I first and foremost aspired to capture and to convey the moment of internal displacement, its separation in two spheres — the objective and the subjective. Submerged in isolation, be it only a temporary or even a deliberate one, the human mind begins to operate in a seesaw-like motion; the consciousness shifts from objective reality to internal images: associations and memories. As if rummaging through an old archive, the mind drifts from the present moment to projections of the found memories and the feelings associated with them and then back again and so forth. [Ex Isolation]

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Kristina Lerner : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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By Azurebumble

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