Posts Tagged ‘portals

23
Oct
10

James Pomerantz : Agua Sagrada (Photography)

“After hanging out for a little while, I noticed how people were drawn to the light and how they would interact with it. Some were clearly anxious about swimming in the dark water and looking for the security of the sun. Others seemed to seek out its warmth. Some would stare up into the light. Others would float face down, peering into water.” James Pomerantz

Agua 7
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Agua 1
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Agua 2
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Agua 3
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Agua 4
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Agua 5
‘Agua Sagrada’ Series
Mexico
2009

Much of James’ work reflects the world after war and disaster, but the images featured below were captured on a vacation. His series, Agua Sagrada, is otherworldly–calming and exquisite and a wonderful visual respite to our chaotic world. The photos were taken in Mexico at a cenote, which is a water-filled sinkhole, found mostly in the Yucatan, that the Mayans believed to be portals to another world. Today these cenotes are tourist destinations, though the otherworldly Mayan connotations are still plainly evident in their haunting, ethereal appearance.

They’re natural sinkholes that connect to subterranean bodies of water. For the Mayans, the cenotes were sources of water and were considered portals to the afterlife. They played an important role in Mayan religion and were often the location of sacrifices and offerings. Today they are frequented by tourists and locals who bathe in the cool water. Each ‘cenote’ has a pretty unique character, some have collapsed ceilings and are totally exposed, others are totally enclosed and lit by artificial lights. The cenote where these photos were made had a single hole in the cave roof. [Extract : Lenscratch]

James Pomerantz : Website

James Pomerantz : Interview (At Length Magazine)

06
Jul
10

Mark Rothko : Red Abstracts

Mark Rothko. Orange, Red, Orange. Oil on paper.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. White stripe. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Untitled. Oil on canvas.

Mark Rothko. Mauve and Orange. Oil on canvas.

One of the preeminent artists of his generation, Mark Rothko is closely identified with the New York School, a circle of painters that emerged during the 1940s as a new collective voice in American art. During a career that spanned five decades, he created a new and impassioned form of abstract painting. Rothko’s work is characterized by rigorous attention to formal elements such as color, shape, balance, depth, composition, and scale; yet, he refused to consider his paintings solely in these terms. He explained:

“It is a widely accepted notion among painters that it does not matter what one paints as long as it is well painted. This is the essence of academicism. There is no such thing as good painting about nothing.”

Mark Rothko Web Feature




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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