Posts Tagged ‘poetry

21
Sep
11

Y SIN EMBARGO magazine Last/s, #29 (new! published!)

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If communicating means to put something in common, is it possible, today, at the height of

the era of communication, putting something in common? Or all we got are monologues?

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Y SIN EMBARGO magazine Last/s, #29 (new! published!)

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ON PAPER / READ ONLINE

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About this issue………Seven years of a periodical and independent publication is perhaps both necessary and long enough a time to verify or put into practice a set of ideas, wishes and adventures.

YSE closes a cycle, but doesn’t close (neither literally nor metaforically). New situations, new circumstances and, most of all, new wishes and interests consume and demand the always limited well of time and energy. We have grown in this seven years without any kind of sponsoring, there was never a financial support or even modest underpinnings to give any logic of survival to the publication.

Everything has been done on breathhold, in a respiratory exercise, at times painful, even if oxygen (of course intangible) always managed to be there in the end. Nevertheless these are times of generalised asphyxia and sometimes – even though nostalgia or stubbornness exert their seduction- it is necessary to dry dock the boat, caulk and face different courses. We will go on…….but we will be other.

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edit, direc & comple by fernandoprats

art direc & desig by Estudi Prats

virtual soport by Rivera Valdez

biotranslations by Alicia Pallas

video by Raquel Barrera Sutorra

music by Albert Jordà / Nevus project

almostopen_by manuel alcaide mengual

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from

roman aixendri manuel alcaide mengual brancolina wilma eras oriol espinal ezook rosa delia guerrero manuel diumenjó h.o. kozology françoise lucas juan pablo sáenz graciela oses alicia pallas carlos pataca leonie polah fernandoprats miguel ruibal nirvana sq jef safi alain vaissiere dou_ble_you azure_b

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from

a coruña, amsterdam, antwerp, barcelona, bielefeld, buenos aires, campredó, dundee, grenoble irapuato london, mar del plata, méxico d.f. nijmegen seattle sevilla tarragona terrassa toronto toulouse

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Thanks to all those who have been reading and watching.
Thanks to all those who take and took part.
You’ll be hearing from us.

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ON PAPER / READ ONLINE

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16
Dec
10

Paul Chan : The 7 Lights

Fold into itself – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Crystal into network – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 3/4 x 3/4 in
2006

Chinese roof into pyramid – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 1/8 x 23 1/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Network into line – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
32 x 23 3.4 x 3/4 in
2006

Circle into spiral – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
31 7/8 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Point into labyrinth – (for 5th Light)
Paper and charcoal on Styrofoam
31 3/4 x 23 7/8 x 3/4 in
2006

Paul Chan’s complete series “The 7 Lights,” offers a unique occasion to explore the practice of a New York-based artist whose work engages such fundamental themes as politics, poetry, war, death, and desire. Begun in 2005, Chan’s ambitious cycle combines obsolete computer technology with hypnotic imagery to create a series of enigmatic encounters with light and darkness. In the title, the word “light” has been struck through, drawing attention to its dramatic absence.

Presented alongside a selection of works on paper, older videos, and a new projection, the Lights create a vast image of cyclical destruction and rebirth, spread across floors and walls like light falling through windows. Structured over the course of a day, each of the Lights begins peacefully, with the warm colors of dawn. Slowly the atmosphere changes: silhouettes of objects rise up through the air and are dismantled by obscure forces, while human shadows plummet towards the ground. Like a dream deteriorating into a nightmare, the sequence becomes increasingly horrific until it fades to dusk and peace returns, waiting for day to break again.

Just as a shadow cannot fully describe the object from which it emanates, “The 7 Lights” convey a narrative that is inevitably incomplete, yet rich with historical references, including ancient Greek mythology and Baroque painting. “The 7 Lights” can also be related to Biblical accounts of the origin of the world and its impending end, suggesting a possible reading of Chan’s cycle as an allegory of the seven days of creation. Furthermore, Chan’s work calls to mind contemporary tragedies such as 9/11, the war in Iraq, and the ongoing eruptions of terrorist violence around the globe. Unfolding like a present-day Last Judgment, a subjective and anonymous hand decides what rises and what falls; touching on the viewer’s own fears, the result is not as one might have imagined – worthless objects ascend while human life is cast aside like rainfall. However, caught as they are in an endless repetition, the Lights suggest that perhaps there is no end, just an eternal beginning. [Extract : New Museum]

Paul Chan : Video Projections

Paul Chan : Drawings

Paul Chan : Audio

Paul Chan : Text

28
Jul
10

Wassily Kandinsky : Klänge (Sounds)

Front Cover
from Klänge (Sounds)

Judgement Day
from Klänge (Sounds)

Black Spot
from Klänge (Sounds)

Improvisation 19
from Klänge (Sounds)

Riding path
from Klänge (Sounds)

Motif from Improvisation 25
from Klänge (Sounds)

Klänge (Sounds)

Sounds comprised thirty-eight prose poems which were accompanied by twelve colour and forty-four black and white woodcuts, each hand-printed under Kandinsky’s supervision. It was published in an edition of 345 c.1912.

The poems contained in the album draw attention to and manipulate the sounds of words in such a way as to destabilise their conventional meanings. ‘Words’, Kandinsky wrote in On the Spiritual in Art, ‘are inner sounds … Skilful use of a word (according to poetic feeling) – an internally necessary repetition of a word twice, three times – can lead [to] unrealised spiritual qualities of the word. Eventually, manifold repetition … makes it lose its external sense as a name’. With this quest for ‘inner meaning’, ‘great possibilities open up for the literature of the future’ as language breaks from the constraints of its traditional usage.

As we read the poems, acoustic rhythms couple with spatial ones to halt our progress through them: we find ourselves re-reading, our eyes moving around the poems, attempting to re-engage or re-enter the works. The sound of the words and the unconventional spacing of words across the page, as well as the remnants of narrative, both ‘articulate’ and ‘dis-articulate’ the whole. The process of re-reading and moving visually around the poem seems to make the text more open: syntax and narrative are lost; the spaces between and beyond words, lines and stanzas, appear to threaten the unity of the text; and – according to Kandinsky’s claims – the words may evoke psychological, synaesthetic or even spiritual associations beyond their literal meanings. [Extract : Tate Modern]

Tate Papers : A Consideration of the Album ‘Sounds’

08
Jul
10

Kurt Schwitters : Collage

“My name is Kurt Schwitters… I am an artist and I nail my pictures together.”

Mz 410 irgendsowas (something or other)
1922
Collage

(Difficult)
c. 1942-43
Collage

Blauer Vogel
1922
Collage

Oorlog
1930
Collage

(Pino Antoni)
c. 1933-34
Collage

Untitled
1939
Collage

Untitled
1929
Collage

“I could see no reason why used tram tickets, bits of driftwood, buttons and old junk from attics and rubbish heaps should not serve well as materials for paintings; they suited the purpose just as well as factory-made paints… It is possible to cry out using bits of old rubbish, and that’s what I did, gluing and nailing them together.” Kurt Schwitters

More Works at MoMa




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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