Posts Tagged ‘physical

09
Mar
12

Berndnaut Smilde : ‘Nimbus’ Series (Probe – Exhibition)

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Probe is an exhibition space, with walls no higher then 1,10m and a surface of 6m2. It’s a test lab, an artistic skinner box. Its small and practical dimensions enables artists, to create works on scale, that are unthinkable in real life. The architecture of the space is flexible and wholly subservient to the exhibition: walls can be extended, doors can be removed, a floor made of glass, mirrors or wood, even the lighting situation can be fully controlled. Albeit a physical space, Probe is only accessible on the internet. The registration of the exhibition is the exhibition. Probe’s flexible dimensions proposes questions, as to the nature of space, seeing for example, that Probe can be wholly absorbed by the installation it contains. Exterior or interior, architecture or sculpture become relative notions. Probe can also be used as an exhibition making tool. The height, size and sequence of several works can be researched without having to drill a hole. Sketches used as dummies, scale warps achieved in seconds.

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Berndnaut is fascinated by anything in between… Corridors and clouds, not yet there
and not yet solid. What if a sculpture were to be nothing but thin air, smoke or scent?
We’d discuss the merits of one cloud over the other or would we just shut up in awe.

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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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::
‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
::

::
‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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::
‘Nimbus’ Series
Cloud in room, 2010
Lambda print, 75 x 112 cm
Probe#6, Suze May Sho, Arnhem
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Interview with Artist

1. How different was it to work in the space of Probe compared to other exhibition spaces?

I usually make a maquette of the space I’m going to work in. A maquette helps me to control and visualize an idea. It provides a clear overview. Probe itself is a model space, and worked for me in the same way: The manner of working is very direct and functional, and being so close to the subject changes the conception of materials and reality. The space is being emphasized. You create an ideal situation and therefore I think the model can stand for an idea. Working in Probe provides an additional point of view to exhibition making and that is an almost god-like position in which you have control over everything. I think it is similar to why people like model-train-landscaping. It’s having total power.

2. What did you want to create in Probe?

I imagined walking into a museum hall with just empty walls. The place even looked deserted. On the one hand I wanted to create an ominous situation. You could see the cloud as a sign of misfortune. You could also read it as an element out of the Dutch landscape paintings in a physical form in a classical museum hall. At the same time I wanted to make (for once) a very clear image, an almost cliché and cartoon like visualisation of having bad luck.

3. What obstacles did you run into?

The idea I had was going to be an ephemeral work. It would only exist as a photo. I thought this would work very well with the idea of Probe, as the exhibitions only exist in the form of documentation. I didn’t realize there is in fact a very physical aspect about Probe’s presentation. The 9 different perspectives of documentation make it possible for the spectator to wander around the space and create the opportunity of visiting the exhibition. Therefore with every shoot we had to make a new cloud and keep in account approximately the same lighting and position to create the illusion of physically walking through the space.

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Berndnaut Smilde : Website

Project Probe

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07
Mar
11

AVPD : Transparency White (D)

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“We define our spatial works as meta-architectures where the normal perception of the spectator is challenged and displaced and a new experience of space is made possible. In our works, we try to rethink the triangular constellation of the subject, the object and the context. We are interested in how spatial constructions effect the perception of the spectator and how she/he grasps the space in a cognitive, emotional and intellectual way. Our domain is reality and our artistic praxis is a spatial laboratory.” avpd

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Transparency White – TW01D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW02D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW03D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW04D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW05D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW06D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Transparency White – TW07D
film, cardboard, tape
39 x 52 x 3.5 cm
2009

Only by the use of A4 transparency film (which is normally used for overhead projectors) mounted in several layers in different combinations this series of works examines the perception of how the light penetrates the layered transparency film creating vibrant light differentiated surfaces/tones. The visibility of the works depends on the light angle which makes the perception of each work physical because the viewer has to move the body to find the right angle to make the work appear. [AVPD]

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AVPD : Website

AVPD : Galeria Leme

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16
Nov
10

Peter Lanyon : Paintings

‘Coast’
Watercolour on paper
466 x 620 mm
1953

‘Headwind’
Oil on canvas
1219 x 1981 mm
1961

‘Offshore’
Oil on canvas
1530 x 1842 mm
1959

‘Green Place’
Oil on canvas
760 x 1020 mm
1959

“All Lanyon’s forms derive, in a very strict sense, from sensory experience of his subject: and I do not limit this to visual experience, because he admits feeling, knowledge and experienced sensation from more than one of his senses. What he sees as he walks or rides on his motorbike through the landscape may constitute the larger part of what goes into a picture. But what he experiences physically – the up-and-downness of the path: the sliding pastness of house, rock or hill as he rides along: the going-throughness of a gap between the rocks – equally has a place in the amalgam of his painting, contributing to the totality of his awareness of the landscape … With Lanyon, every canvas recreates a particular hill (or harbour, or cliff) by merging the evidence gained through numerous channels from more than one viewpoint” Patrick Heron

Lanyon took up gliding in 1959 and this had a profound effect on his work as he translated the experiences that he encountered in the air into his paintings, collages and constructions.

‘This is why I do gliding myself, to get actually into the air itself and get a further sense of depth and space into yourself, as it were, into your own body, and then carry it through a painting. I think this is a further extension of what Turner was doing’. Peter Lanyon

Peter Lanyon : Tate Collection

Peter Lanyon : Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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