Posts Tagged ‘overlapping

10
May
12

Brandon Lattu : Photography (Conceptual)

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“Ultimately, Photography is subversive not when it frightens, repels or even
stigmatizes, but when it’s pensive, when it thinks” R Barthes, Camera Lucida

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‘Miracle Mile looking west, skyline view’
43 x 47 inches
inkjet print
2000
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‘Miracle Mile looking west, north side car view’
43 x 47 inches
inkjet print
2000
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‘Miracle Mile looking west, south side car view’
43 x 47 inches
inkjet print
2000
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‘Miracle Mile looking west, south side pedestrian view’
42 x 47 inches
inkjet print
2000
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‘Miracle Mile looking west, north side pedestrian view’
43 x 47 inches
inkjet print
2000
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Brandon Lattu is a conceptualist who uses photography, sculpture, and digitally based imagery, Lattu has carefully labored over the most intricate details of his images to produce works that seduce with a deceptively simple and elegant beauty. At the same time these images resonate on an equally powerful sentient level. The manipulation, clarity, and overload of information in these images triggers the recognition that we can visually imagine a scene such as this but we will never see in this way. In “Miracle Mile”, Lattu utilizes the extent of photographic technology to produce a series of views looking West down the length of ‘Wilshire Boulevard’ between ‘La Brea’ and ‘Fairfax Avenues’ in Los Angeles.

Presented on a pure field of black, the only images depicted are the illuminated signs. Contrasting this black field of nothingness, each sign is presented in its accurate place and scale in relation to the section depicted. Perspective is eliminated and some signs appear backwards as one might see them while looking in a side view mirror from a car at night. With careful inspection the viewer becomes aware that commercial competition is investigated in this piece through the presence of stores directly across the street from one another. For example, on the north side of the street, Rite Aid, Staples and Blockbuster vie with Sav-on, Office Depot and Hollywood video on the south side offering essentially the same products. Here and throughout Lattu’s oeuvre, the instinctual attraction of sublime visual pleasure becomes inseparable from intellectual engagement. [Extract : Leo Koenig Inc – April 13, 2004]

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Brandon Lattu : Monte Clark Gallery

Brandon Lattu : Leo Koenig Inc

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08
Dec
11

Mario Giacomelli : Photography

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“No image can be “reality” because reality it happens only once before my eyes.” Mario Giacomelli

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‘my whole life’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1997-00
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‘my whole life’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1997-00
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‘Happiness is reached walk’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1986-96
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‘past’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1986-96
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‘moon widow’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1986-96
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‘infinity’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1986-96
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‘my whole life’ series
mario giacomelli
photograph
1997-00
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“To be sure the landscape can’t run away, and yet I always fear that it may. [Sometimes] I must set up my tripod, so I worry that the landscape may disappear the next second and I don’t stop keeping an eye on it while I get prepared. Then, when pressing the shutter, I hold my breath. These moments are the greatest joys in my life, as if I were undressing the most beautiful woman in the world—that is, if she will allow herself be undressed. If the photo is a success, it means that she was willing. If not, it has been a lovely dream.” – Mario Giacomelli

“A photo isn’t only what you see, but also what your imagination adds to it. My own imagination may add something else, a third person’s something else again. But does it matter? What matters is the contact between us, the fact that we talk about trees losing their leaves, about objects we crush underfoot without realizing it, about that house dying gently, abandoned by its owner, even though it’s the house where he was born, where he learnt to cry and to laugh.” – Mario Giacomelli

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Mario Giacomelli : Website

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02
Nov
11

Liang Quan : Artworks (Collage on Linen)

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‘tranquil sea’
ink and rice paper
125 × 95 cm
2010

‘tranquil sea’
ink and rice paper
125 × 95 cm
2010

‘forbidden city’
ink and rice paper
125 × 95 cm
2010

‘sailing afar’
ink and rice paper
200 × 150 cm
2010

‘untitled’
ink and rice paper
125 × 95 cm
2010

‘sailing afar’
ink and rice paper
200 × 150 cm
2010

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He uses paper strips as the basic material. The basic color area is formed by dyeing, mounting, and adding tea color. Which method should be used to combine these dyeing or undying papers together? This method is the “abstract”, or “subtle infringe”. We can see the edges of lines and the color areas give us a feeling of repetition after being overlapped and processed by pencil. The existing “steel lines” or color areas with hard edges, seems to convert Rothko’s ragged colored edges and making them look softer. It is not simply a collage, but a way of mediation and prayer by heart.

Repeatedly adjusting the collage is constant, getting close to our breath. Painting refers to “adjusting painting” and it not only includes lines painted by a ruler, but also the rough lines surrounding the color areas and edges, either delicate or scattered. The blank spaces between the lines and colored areas create an inner space for the paintings; while wrinkles make the surface full of richness. Creation is an echo impacted among these color areas and is a free relation. This process of repetition is a kind of “polyphonic poetics”. Liang himself believes that this repeated adjustment is patient, calm and alert.

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[Extract : The Poetics of Surface and the Possibility of Abstract Naturalism – Dr. Kejun Xia]

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Liang Quan : Artworks

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21
Sep
10

Jenny Okun : Photography

Bergamot White Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Morphosis Beverly Building Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1988

Getty Shadows Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Getty Terrace Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1997

Carmy House Floor Triptych
Los Angeles, California, U.S.A.
Inkjet Print
1995

Okun records architectural structures through multiple exposures. Using a large-format Hasselblad camera, she takes a picture, then advances the film only slightly to achieve a layering effect. A single image may comprise six such overlays, which might then become part of a triptych. Okun’s background is in film, so it follows that the spatial information unfolds sequentially; the images are fragmented and superimposed, causing unexpectedly lyrical interpretations of buildings and space to emerge.

Yet for all their abstraction, what is also compelling about these images is their essentially traditional approach to the documentation of architecture. These days, architectural photography tends to consider circumstances beyond the built form:- climate, use, landscape, and human accessibility — to position the building in its social and environmental context. Okun, however, sticks to the structural facts; her images read as formal records and revelations of space, form, color, and light.

[Extract : Metropolis Magazine, May 1996 : Harmonious Fragments By Akiko Busch]

Craig Krull Gallery

Jenny Okun : Website

Kashya Hildebrand Gallery




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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