Posts Tagged ‘oils

11
May
12

Graham Gillmore : Paintings (Works on Panel)

::

::
‘Sunset Applause’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 60 in
::

::
‘Answers To The Questions To The Answers’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
::

::
‘After You’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
::

::
‘Trash the Planet’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
80 X 72 in
::

::
‘Damp Wounds Sorely Mist’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
90 X 72 in
::

::
‘Don’t be so Naive’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
::

::
‘Wash Away Yovr Tears’
Oil and enamel on panel
Graham Gillmore
72 X 60 in
::

The nature of my project has never been about boiling anything down, but rather exposing the complexities of human experience; particularly one’s self as subject and the world as object. The ‘self’ and the ‘other’ play a pivotal role as subject matter within my manipulations with language – locating, defining and ultimately obscuring any kind of singular ‘meaning’ behind or beneath the surfaces of the world. These games (self imploding sentences, misreadings , backfirings revisions, second thoughts etc.) offer access to the hope for authentic – if flawed – communication while confronting the indeterminacy of language, both literary and abstract. I use these self-conscious devices for a ‘defamiliarizing’ effect. Text allows the work to maintain a narrative thread while maintaining an allegiance to non-figurative imagery. I play the role of scavenger when it comes to the texts I use. I think of these selected fragments as a kind of linguistic ‘road kill’ – skeletons on which to hang the material of the painting. I am engaged with texts that evoke a certain prickliness or an emotional angle that is slightly askew, with an emphasis on themes rooted in an emotional or psychological realm rather than intellect. Sensation overides thought, just as fantasy takes the place of history. Statement

::

Graham Gillmore : Monte Clark Gallery

::

Advertisements
29
Apr
12

Nazafarin Lotfi : Paintings

::

::
‘Painting’
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
65″ x 55″
2010
::

::
‘Painting’
Spray Paint and Acrylic on Canvas
40″ x 40″
2010
::

::
‘Painting’
Oil and Acrylic on Canvas
40″ x 40″
2010
::

::
‘Painting’
Acrylic and Flashe Paint on Canvas
40″ x 40″
2010
::

::
‘Painting’
acrylic and paper on canvas
30″ x 30″
2012
::

::
‘Painting’
acrylic and paper on canvas
18″ x 18″
2012
::

::
‘Painting’
spray paint, acrylic, fishing line
12″ x 12″
2012
::

Nazafarin’s work performs as a stage for an event to happen where she searches for a particular moment, one that has passed or is to come. She empties out her thinking by refusing to let any one thought dominate in its visibility… almost everything is left out to compose a world exhausted of life. bio

::

Nazafarin Lotfi : Website

::

17
Apr
12

Robert Olsen : Paintings

::

::
‘untitled’
gesso on canvas
11 x 19.5 in
2009
::

::
‘untitled’
oil on panel
11 x 19.5 in
2010
::

::
‘untitled’
gesso on canvas
11 x 19.5 in
2009
::

::
‘untitled’
oil on panel
11 x 19.5 in
2010
::

::
‘untitled’
gesso on canvas
11 x 19.5 in
2009
::

::
‘untitled’
oil on panel
11 x 19.5 in
2010
::

::
‘untitled’
gesso on canvas
11 x 19.5 in
2009
::

Robert Olsen : Website

::

22
Feb
12

Daniel Hutchinson : Paintings

::

::
‘Stadium North’
Oil and mylar on birch panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
::

::
‘Stadium North’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
::

::
‘Bandshell and Shadows’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
::

::
‘Conifers’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2010
::

::
‘Natural Amphitheatre, Parlee Brook II’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2011
::

::
‘Natural Amphitheatre, Parlee Brook, N.B’
Oil and drafting film on panel
Daniel Hutchinson
2011
::

My paintings address the subject of performance and the different architectural typologies that influence the exchange between audience and performer. I am interested in the ways in which architecture shapes the complex phenomena associated with the performer-audience transaction. In a complimentary fashion, my paintings have been made to shape reciprocal painting-observer interaction through light responsive surfaces that engage audiences in an expression analogous to performance.

I render each oil painting with a variety of grey and black hues on drafting film mounted onto panel. The result is a near monochrome picture that largely avoids traditional modeling of light and dark in the painting; rather the image emerges where actual light is caught in the grooves and reflected from the ridges of each carefully executed brushstroke. The viewer’s movement enables light to shift across the surface, simultaneously revealing and concealing parts of the subject.

My images are constantly on the verge of disintegration, as the indeterminate movement of light over the surface plunges areas into deep, endless blackness while bringing other areas into the brilliant, hard-edged focus of reflected light. Devoid of dramatic tableaux, my works suggest meaning through connotation, metaphor and through formal composition and presentation. My paintings gain further interest from the interchange of physical/optical experience and the non-locality of their depicted virtual topologies. At issue in my two-dimensional pictures is the reconciliation they offer between our three-dimensional, corporeal world and the zero dimensions of digital space. It is my aim to render, as real and palpable, indeterminate zones of infinite possibility – monochrome paintings that are as surprisingly unfixed, ephemeral and unpredictable as performance itself. – [Statement : D Hutchinson]

::

Daniel Hutchinson : Website

::

20
Sep
10

Francis Bacon : Paintings (Triptych)

Second Version of Triptych 1944
oil on canvas
198.1 x 147.3 cm (each)
1988

Second Version of Triptych 1944
oil on canvas
198.1 x 147.3 cm
1988

Second Version of Triptych 1944
oil on canvas
198.1 x 147.3 cm
1988

Second Version of Triptych 1944
oil on canvas
198.1 x 147.3 cm
1988

Francis Bacon is internationally acknowledged as among the most powerful painters of the twentieth century. His vision of the world was unflinching and entirely individual, encompassing images of sensuality and brutality, both immediate and timeless. When he first emerged to public recognition, in the aftermath of the Second World War, his paintings were greeted with horror. Shock has since been joined by a wide appreciation of Bacon’s ability to expose humanity’s frailties and drives.

Bacon sought to express what it was to live in a world without God or afterlife. By setting sensual abandon and physical compulsion against hopelessness and irrationality, he showed the human as simply another animal. As a response to the challenge that photography posed for painting, he developed a unique realism which could convey more about the state of existence than photography’s representation of the perceived world. In an era dominated by abstract art, he amassed and drew upon a vast array of visual imagery, including art of the past, photography and film. [Tate Britain]

Francis Bacon : Estate

Explore Francis Bacon : Tate Britain




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

email address

Join 492 other followers

Advertisements