Posts Tagged ‘New York

23
Jun
12

Ezra Stoller : Architectural Photography

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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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TWA Terminal, Eero Saarinen, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1962
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Seagram Building, Mies van der Rohe, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1958
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Guggenheim Museum, Frank Lloyd Wright, New York
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1959
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Louis Isidore Kahn, Olivetti Underwood Factory, Harrisburg
Gelatin Silver Print
Ezra Stoller
1966-1970
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Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1963
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Milwaukee War Memorial, Eero Saarinen
Gelatin Silver Print
16″ × 20″
1952
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Ezra Stoller’s gelatin silver prints include images of architectural interiors and iconic landmarks. Based on his background in architecture and industrial design, Stoller used a large-format camera to photograph monumental 20th century buildings, including the Guggenheim Museum, the TWA terminal at Idlewild Airport (now John F. Kennedy International Airport), the Seagram Building, the Salk Institute, Yale Art and Architecture Building and Fallingwater. In addition to well-known photographs of these locations, these works also include lesser-known photographs of small homes and guest houses which provide a fresh look at the masterful eye that established Stoller as the preeminent photographer of modern architecture. A pioneer in the field of architectural photography, Ezra Stoller was commissioned by architects such as Frank Lloyd Wright, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, I.M. Pei, Marcel Breuer and Richard Meier, because of his unique ability to capture the building according to the architect’s vision and to lock it into the architectural canon. His photographs convey a three-dimensional experience of architectural space through a two-dimensional medium, with careful attention to vantage point and lighting condition, as well as line, color, form and texture. – [Extract : Press Release – Yossi Milo Gallery]

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Ezra Stoller : Yossi Milo Gallery

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07
Mar
12

Constantine Manos : ‘Times Square at Night’ (Photography)

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“The flow of people in a setting, their changing relationships to each other and their environment, and their ever changing expressions and movements – all combine to create dynamic situations that provide the photographer with limitless choices of when to push the button. By choosing a precise intersection between subject and time, he may transform the ordinary into the extraordinary and the real into the surreal.” – c.m.

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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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‘Times Square at Night’
New York City
Photograph
2002
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Magnum photographer Constantine Manos explores the dynamic intersection between subject and time, the real and the surreal. Manos captures the varied spectrum of contemporary life in all its offbeat and charming strangeness. These moments are elusive and varied, asking questions without giving ready answers. Ordinary people drift between technicolor landscapes and dark shadows, whilst Manos’s lens unleashes a cacophony of brilliant colours so often overlooked in day to day observation…

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Constantine Manos : Website

Constantine Manos : Magnum Photos

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28
Jan
12

Ernst Haas : Colour Photography

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“I never really wanted to be a photographer. It slowly grew out of the compromise of a boy who desired to combine two goals — explorer or painter. I wanted to travel, see and experience. What better profession could there be than the one of a photographer, almost a painter in a hurry, overwhelmed by too many constantly changing impressions? But all my inspirational influences came much more from all the arts than from photo magazines.” – Ernst Haas

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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1981’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1961’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1962’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1975’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘America, 1956’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘New York, 1952’
Colour Photography
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Ernst Haas
‘Utah, 1969’
Colour Photography
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Haas’s frustration with the limitations of technology pushed him at every turn to be slightly ahead of his time. He was a technological pioneer with the eye of a painter and the soul of a poet. It has been written that before Haas there was no color photography, only colored photographs. Haas’s first color essay was on New York, the city he would ultimately make his home. When the editors of LIFE magazine saw it, they gave it an unheard-of layout of 24 pages and called it “Magic Images of a City”.

Essays on Paris and Venice followed. Ten years later, when the Museum of Modern Art held their first color retrospective, it was the work of Haas they chose to feature. Though a Magnum photographer in the heyday of photojournalism, Haas was not interested in color as reportage. He was interested in the super-reality of dreams. To achieve this he gave commonplace objects and silhouettes new meaning. A reflection brought home the hidden depths underlying a conventional urban storefront; torn posters peeling off buildings shaped themselves into an art gallery. In his quest to produce feelings, he introduced hues and tones never before seen in printed color. And at all times his work was informed and enlightened by a guiding intelligence capable of great and quizzical humor. – [Essay by Inge Bondi]

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Ernst Haas : Website

Ernst Haas : Getty Images

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14
Oct
11

Alec Cheer : New York Series (Photography)

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“smoke + flags”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

“spectral L train”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

“brookyln chinese”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

“w bridge”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

“cold sun”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

“empire reflection”
photograph
alec cheer
2011

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Alec Cheer : More Works

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30
Mar
11

Azurebumble : “Retro-Furbished” (Andreas Feininger)

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A reworking of the 1940s ‘Andreas Feininger’ photograph “Rooftops, 42nd Street, New York”

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Original photograph can be viewed on this blog: here

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section ‘a’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

section ‘b’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

section ‘c’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

section ‘d’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

section ‘e’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

section ‘f’
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

full image
azurebumble
“retro-furbished”
(andreas feininger)

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Azurebumble : Website

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10
Mar
11

Michael Najjar : ‘Netropolis’ (Hybrid Photography)

hong kong
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

new york
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

são paulo
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

peking
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

berlin
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

dubai
‘netropolis’
lightjet-print
48 x 70 inches

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The series ‘Netropolis’ [2003 – 2006] is an exploration of the way global cities will develop in the future. In 1926 director Fritz Lang created the vision of a futuristic 21st Century megacity in his film ‘Metropolis’. Now that we’ve crossed the threshold of the 21st Century new sets of factors unthought of by Lang move to shape the future of our urban species. Of similar magnitude to the impact of the industrial revolution in the late 19th Century, it is now computer networks and the information society based on them which are the main vehicles for change, the key elements transforming the face of our urban living spaces. The complexity of a huge megacity is to be considered as material embodiment of information density. Telematic space endows the urban environment with a new form of structure, intermingling with it and giving birth to a completely unprecedented form of urban space.

The panoramic view transforms the reality of urban spacial structure into landscape. The digital fusion of panoramic views taken from different angles transforms the landscape into a woven fabric of relationships which is abstract and multi-layered yet still underpinned by a geographic reference point. Viewing the city from a distance inverses the perceptual order of objects viewed in close up. The view from afar is orientated on what is clearly visible from a distance and provides a context for objects which appear too close when viewed close up and thus retain their strangeness. In virtual space, however, distance and proximity lie on the selfsame level. The different cities and relationship strands need first to be combined and interwoven before they can give rise to a completely unprecedented and imaginary form of urbanity – the telematic netropolis. [michael najjar : series description]

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Michael Najjar : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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