Posts Tagged ‘mysterious

04
Jul
12

Issei Suda : Photography

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‘Untitled (Sunflower)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Girl on swing)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Clouds)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kuroishi, Aomori, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Eyes and bicycles)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Kanda, Tokyo, Japan’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Woman behind flowers)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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‘Untitled (Skirt)’
Vintage silver print
Late 70s – 1981
Issei Suda
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Issei Suda’s complex portraits and street scenes reveal his intense interest in the mysterious side of everyday life and otherworldliness. His first notable book and exhibition ‘Fushi Kaden’ (transmission of the flower of acting style} was a series based on the fifteenth-century treatise by ‘Zeami’ on the principles of ‘No theatre.’ Suda, a devout student of Zeami, translates the treatise in photographs that return to an emotional landscape that predates the rise of cities produced on his trips to remote locations in Japan from 1971 – 1978. Often his photographs are suspended in time, either one moment too soon or too late, allowing for an unsettling effect on the viewer. His fascination continues in photographic scenes remembered from days past and preserved regardless of time. His series include people who dress up for festivals, dreamlike landscapes and studies of pattern, texture and beauty. [X]

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Issei Suda : Higher Pictures

Issei Suda : Charles A Hartman

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02
May
12

Ben Ali Ong : Photography Series

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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Refluent Hours’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Black Sun (The Art of Dying)’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Ballads of the Dead and Dreaming’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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‘Songs for Sorrow’
Photography Series
Ben Ali Ong
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Throughout my work I have been primarily interested in the suggestive possibilities between the images, and the open narrative I can create by juxtaposing the interior and exterior world beside each other. Portraits next to landscape, for example, and the tension between these two environments. Whilst there are reoccurring motifs and symbols that appear throughout, the importance is on mood, metaphor and emotion, and how different subjects can both carry these feelings and somehow come together, creating my own ambiguous black and white world – similar in a way to the surrealist 1920’s film noir. Birds are frequent symbols that appear throughout the work. Inspired by mythology, they assume a variety of roles. They have been symbols of power and freedom throughout the ages, and are seen to link the human world to the divine. Silhouetted birds in the cloud scape, brooding vistas, faces emerging from darkness, all come together in an attempt to produce an imaginative and mysterious landscape. Early visual influences for me have been Caravaggio and Francis Bacon, beginning with a general attraction to the darker sensibilities of each artists work and it’s sometimes macabre nature. The use of stark, direct lighting and heavy shadows in Caravaggio’s paieces, as well Bacon’s apparent painted ‘blur’ have both made their technical influences. By shooting 35mm black and white film and layering negatives together during the scanning stage, as well as the use of surface scratching and inscriptions to the negative, I try evoke a dream like detachment of an earlier age. BAO

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Ben Ali Ong : Website

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23
Apr
12

Azurebumble : ‘AI : Series’ (Photography Book)

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Recently, I’ve curated a number of image series by photographers from ‘Flickr’ on my blog ‘Aesthetic Investigations’. Subsequently, I thought it would be interesting to document these works in a book. Therefore, i’ve arranged a collection of ’39’ abstract and minimal photographic series by these ’32’ artists. A selection of pages from the book can be viewed below, a full book preview can be seen: HERE

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Thank you to everyone who contributed their images to this project.

All graphic content and curations by : Alan Wilson ( azurebumble )

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Book Cover
Front & Back Pages
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Introductory Pages
Copyright & Contents
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Introductory Pages
Tags, Artists & Series Thumbnails
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Photography Series
Gianni Galassi
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Photography Series
Teresa (Colourful Life) & roB_meL
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Photography Series
Camilo Todemann & Olli Kekäläinen
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Photography Series
Brancolina & Barbara Stumm
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Photography Series
Françoise Lucas & Leonie Polah
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Photography Series
Julian Gomez & Tom Mclaughlan
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Artists

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Alec Cheer……………………Annemie Hiele……………………..Azurebumble……………………Barbara Stumm

Brancolina………………….Camilo Todemann…………………..Daniel Molina…………………….Fernandoprats

Françoise Lucas…………….Gianni Galassi…………………….James Withey……………….John Kosmopoulos

Julian Gomez……………Krystina Stimakovits…………………Leonie Polah………………………….Lillykeeper

Lord Jezzer…………………..Lucie Bourassa…………………..Mark Valentine…………………..Olli Kekäläinen

Peter Moons…………………..Phédia Mazuc……………………..Rita Vita Finzi…………………………….roB_meL

Shari Baker……………………Steffen Tuck………………..Teresa (Colourful life)…………..Tom McLaughlan

Visualisarium…………………..Wilma Eras……………………Wouter Hogendorp……………………….Zel Nunes

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VIEW FULL BOOK PREVIEW AND PURCHASE HERE

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05
Apr
12

Dirk Braeckman : Photography

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‘N.P.-P.O.-04’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘C.O.-I.S.L.-94’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘R.P.-B.X.-00’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘NN’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘S.H.-L.O.-05’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘NN’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘S.H.-S.A.-05’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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‘N.P.-E.D.-04’
Dirk Braeckman
Photograph
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When we see photographs by the Belgian artist Dirk Braeckman installed in museums, we seem to be looking at photographs that aspire to the condition of painting. They’re large (he likes them to be life-size.) They’re unglazed (he wants no interruption to the eye.) They demand as slow an act of looking as any painting. They’ve the same richness and variety of tones of grey as works by Richter or Celmins. Indeed, Braeckman’s most famous photograph, C.O.-I.S.L.-94, is of a painting. Before printing he re-cropped it so we see nothing of the frame or surroundings. But this is no normal reproduction of a painting: the light catches the bumpiness of the painting, the lines made by the vertical stretcher bar.

Every scratch or nail is as clear as a blemish or mole on a person’s face. A banal painting becomes a beautiful photograph, at once meditative and haunting. Yet Braeckman is seeking neither to be a painter manqué nor to supplant painting. When he talks about photography, he could easily be talking about painting: A photograph is, in fact, nothing more than a surface made up of blacks, whites and greys. This entirely abstract vision for me dovetails with what is pictured in the photo: a portrait, an anecdote. … It fluctuates, in my own work too, between abstraction and representation; between the object, the material and the representation, the reality behind it, the so-called real image.

“There are few photographers more committed to the specifics of their own medium. Rather, his antipathy to easy snapshots, his concern with the mysteriousness of banal things and rooms, with letting a place reveal itself slowly through time, means his work runs in parallel with certain kinds of painting but retains its photographic status. Like some other recent photographic works, they hang more comfortably alongside paintings than many photographs in the past.” ~ Tony Godfrey (2009)

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Dirk Braeckman : Website

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16
Mar
12

Junku Nishimura : Street Photography

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“Don’t think. Feel” ~ Bruce Lee ~ (Enter the Dragon)

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‘Solo’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2012
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‘Workshop in Bangkok’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2012
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‘Hand’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2011
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‘Flame’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2011
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‘Untitled’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2010
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‘Bus Terminal’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2009
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‘We, all, ainu’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2010
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‘Ja!’
Junku Nishimura
Photograph
2010
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Junku Nishimura is a Japanese street photographer. Looking through Junku’s pictures is like discovering an old dusty attic album of beautiful, vintage photographs taken in another time, another surreal place. His subjects are mysterious, alluring, and appear trapped within a moment in a timeless tale – traits which seem to reflect the very man behind the lens that froze them, as revealed in an interview with Invisible Photographer Asia. Welcome to the vintage funky voyeuristic world of Junku Nishimura. ~ [IPA]

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Junku Nishimura : More Works (Flickr)

Junku Nishimura : Invisible Interview & Photo Essay

Short Film: Junku Nishimura, A Japanese Street Photographer in Singapore

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14
Feb
12

Bernard Reyboz : Sculptures

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‘Sculpture’
Acrylic resin, Wood
50 x 42 x 20 cm
2004
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‘Sculpture’
Acrylic resin, Wood
120 x 120 x 39 cm
2005
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‘Sculpture’
Acrylic resin, Wood
100 x 100 x 10 cm
1998-99
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‘Sculpture’
Acrylic resin, Wood
53 x 53 x 44 cm
1998-99
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‘Sculpture’
Acrylic resin, Wood
42 x 50 x 20 cm
2002
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‘Tripods’
Acrylic resin
155 x 400 x 300 cm
2004
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“My attraction to pebbles was so strong that it led me to their close study. It was then translated into a series of paintings and drawings realised with the best trompe-l’œil technique my hands were capable of at the time.’ Year after year, this work on pebbles reveals itself in 3 dimensions and offers us ‘volumes covered with signs, writings, and ‘organic signs’… volumes that have become graphic mediums destined to be closer to expression, interpretation and fantasy “. Over that period of time, the object that first inspired me with mystery, patience and respect, became an invitation to play. Later, these volumes lost there signs and became “dead mineral objects”, “burnt” objects, “blackened” by the depths of the Earth and then rejected on it to create new landscapes”. B.R. – [Extract : Pebbles Series]

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Bernard Reyboz : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
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