Posts Tagged ‘minimalist

07
Dec
10

Lewis Baltz : Photography

‘The Prototype Works’ series
gelatin silver print
15.3 x 22.8 cm
1973

‘The Prototype Works’ series
gelatin silver print
15.3 x 22.8 cm
1973

‘The new Industrial Parks’ series
gelatin silver print
15.1 x 22.8 cm
1974

‘The new Industrial Parks’ series
gelatin silver print
15.1 x 22.8 cm
1974

‘The new Industrial Parks’ series
gelatin silver print
15.1 x 22.8 cm
1974

‘The new Industrial Parks’ series
gelatin silver print
15.1 x 22.8 cm
1974

Next to Bernd and Hilla Becher, Stephen Shore and Henry Wessel, Lewis Baltz is one of the most prominent representatives of the New Topographics movement, which was seminal to the development of conceptual photography.

Baltz’s photo series document the side effects of industrial civilization on the landscape, focusing on places that lie outside the bounds of canonical reception: urban wastelands, abandoned industrial sites, warehouses. His photographs uncover the correspondences between spatial forms that occur in the everyday world and advanced forms found in art. Baltz’s strategies imply a reflexive knowledge of the history of photography in that they deploy the photographer as a teacher of seeing who makes things visible through reductive gestures. He already turned in the mid-1960s towards a reduced, minimalist-style aesthetic, orienting himself on artists in the fields of painting, sculpture and Land Art.

The Prototype Works and the 25-piece The Tract Houses are among his earliest projects, which broke with mainstream photographic traditions to reveal pronounced modernist references. Baltz manages in his work to extend the notion of the documentary; he “emphasizes the paradoxical position of photography within the art history of its time” (Sheryl Conkelton).

Baltz’s minimalist and reduced image compositions explore the photographic style as a process, and refer not only to the art of photographers like Lee Friedlander or Robert Frank but also to painters and sculptors of his day such as Donald Judd, Frank Stella, Jasper Johns or Sol LeWitt. Convergences are to be found in his formal and aesthetic compositional patterns as well as in the content he fixes on, which Baltz subjects to a highly critical analysis, without however losing sight of essentials. The focus is on universal aspects instead of particularities, as expressed above all in his “Prototype Works”.

[Extract : Galerie Thomas Zander]

Interview : American Suburb X

Lewis Baltz : George Eastman House

07
Dec
10

Lewis Baltz : “New Topographic” (Slideshow)

14
Jul
10

Charlotte Posenenske : Artist

Series D
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series D
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series D
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series D
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series D
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series DW
(Square Tubes)
1967

Series DW
(Corrugated Cardboard)
1967

Charlotte Posenenske was among Germany’s leading artists in the 1960s, creating minimalist sculptures based on the industrial principles of modular reduction, seriality, and standardization. In an effort to limit individuality in her work, she restricted both her choice of materials and her color palette, using only sheet steel, cardboard, or aluminum painted with weatherproof RAL standard paint in black, blue, red, and yellow. The works were intended to be produced in unlimited series, distributed at cost, and presented in public, rather than gallery, contexts. In this way, Posenenske’s oeuvre is formally aligned with European Minimalism but fundamentally rooted in Conceptual Art as it engages issues of participation and institutional critique.

Charlotte Posenenske conceives of the series D and DW: quadrangular tubes rely on a modular system in which production, distribution, and consumerism, call into question industrial processes. Their manipulation is entrusted to the spectator (series DW) and their assemblage is delegated to the exhibition curator (series D). By leaving the final form of her works up to others’ imaginations and supervision, the artist celebrates societal cooperation and criticizes standardized work. Between perfection and disorder, imagination and impediments, vindication and powerlessness, fluid diversions and rational forms, Charlotte Posenenske imposes a poetry of improvised action.

“I make series because I do not want to make single pieces for individuals, in order to have elements combinable within a system, in order to make something which is repeatable, objective, and because it is economical. The series could be prototypes for mass production.” Charlotte Posenenske

Charlotte Posenenske : Works in Colour




Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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