Posts Tagged ‘metal

16
Aug
12

U-Ram Choe : ‘Custos Cavum’ (Sculpture Video)

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Custos Cavum, 2011
size : 220(h) x 360(w) x 260(d)cm
material : metallic material, resin, motor, gear, custom CPU board, LED

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Once upon a time, there were two worlds. Each connected to the other through a number of small holes, as if the worlds were breathing through these holes. However, the holes had a tendency to close up, so there were guardians next to each one to keep them open. The guardians were called “Custos Cavum.” They took the form of seals and had large front teeth, which they used to gnaw the holes to prevent them from closing up. Whenever a Custos Cavum felt the generation of a new hole somewhere, it fell into a deep sleep. From the body of the quietly sleeping Custos Cavum grew winged spores called “Unicuses.” These spores took flight and each flew to a new hole, giving rise to a new Custos Cavum. As time went on, the people of each world forgot about the other. The guardians lost their power and died. When the last Custos Cavum died, the last hole closed, separating the two worlds completely. The existence of the other world was entirely erased from people’s memories. – [X]

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U-Ram Choe : Website

U-Ram Choe : Vimeo

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17
Jan
12

Heidi Leverty : ‘Outbox’ Series (Photography)

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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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‘Outbox Series’
Heidi Leverty
Photograph
2009-10
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“This body of work is about recycled and discarded items that no longer perform the functions for which they were intended. What appears to be without value is in fact a source of inspiration, a bounty of objects d’art. Removed from their first use, these materials of paper, metal, plastic and fabric secrete an unexpected visual richness, the product of chance. My art focuses on items that are part of our daily lives, art that is integrated into the culture and community. My intention is to portray the unique and extraordinary in the seemingly ordinary.

Up close, these mundane and discarded objects become poetic abstractions of strength and emotion. As I see these objects condemned to destruction, I experience the conflict between human classification of uselessness, a sense of loss in wasted function and the unexpected attraction of sublime beauty in overlooked places. Bales of shredded paper, cartons, boxes of varied hues and metal sliced like luncheon meat give way to a collage of life in which we all take part.

Unique and ephemeral works, sculptured forms with an intense beauty, all emerge from piles of rusty metal objects and roll of sheet metal. Their colour markings suggesting comparisons with the splashes of Jackson Pollock. Although these images are abstracts in approach, they are documentary in their representation, and powerful enough to create public awareness and make one reflect on the eventual metamorphosis of these used and unwanted products. Simple objects retired from use in passage from refuse to trash to recycled material.” — Heidi Leverty

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Heidi Leverty : Website

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04
Dec
11

Peter Keetman : ‘Volkswagen Werk’ Series (Photography)

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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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‘Volkswagen werk’
gelatin silver print
peter keetman
1953
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In 1953, Peter Keetman spent a week at the Volkswagen plant in Wolfsburg. The result was a series of exceptionally clear, almost abstractly detailed photographs that document the entire production process of the VW Beetle. Storage stacks of shiny metal bumpers look like so many modernist sculptures; car bodies hovering above the assembly line retrospectively form a surreal Pop Art montage. This oversize publication reproduces the Volkswagenwerk series in full, in their original size, together with texts that refer both to this series and to Keetman’s greater oeuvre.

Keetman was known throughout his career as a photographer of systemically conceived picture series on themes that included close-ups of water and oil drops, a style of working he developed as a member of Fotoform. Fotoform, a German movement of the 1950s of which he was a primary proponent, and was critical in the development of German photography as it is today: the groups subjective photography combined scientific objectivity with abstraction. [P.Keetman : Book Synopsis]

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Peter Keetman : More Works

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

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By Azurebumble

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