Posts Tagged ‘lithographs

16
Apr
12

El Lissitzky : ‘Prouns’ Series

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the station where one changes from painting to architecture.” ~ El Lissitzky

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‘Announcer’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Globetrotter in Time’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Neuer (New Man)’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Untitled’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Tatlin at Work’
El Lissitzky
1921
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‘Proun G7’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’
El Lissitzky
1923
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‘Proun’ was essentially El Lissitzky’s exploration of the visual language of suprematism with spatial elements, utilizing shifting axes and multiple perspectives; both uncommon ideas in suprematism. Suprematism at the time was conducted almost exclusively in flat, 2D forms and shapes, and El Lissitzky, with a taste for architecture and other 3D concepts, tried to expand suprematism beyond this. His Proun works spanned over a half a decade and evolved from straightforward paintings and lithographs into fully three-dimensional installations. They would also lay the foundation for his later experiments in architecture and exhibition design. While the paintings were artistic in their own right, their use as a staging ground for his early architectonic ideas was significant. In these works, the basic elements of architecture – volume, mass, color, space and rhythm – were subjected to a fresh formulation in relation to the new suprematist ideals. Through his Prouns, utopian models for a new world were developed. This approach, in which the artist creates art with socially defined purpose, could aptly be summarized with his edict “das zielbewußte Schaffen” – “task oriented creation.” ~ [Ext]

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El Lissitzky : More Works

El Lissitzky : Russian Constructivists

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13
Feb
12

Masanari Murai : ‘Lithographs’

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‘Three Faces’
lithograph on paper
65.7 x 50.5 cm
1958
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‘Mother and Child’
lithograph on paper
51 x 38 cm
1956
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‘Singing’
lithograph on paper
64 x 45.7 cm
1956
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‘Collection of Japanese Lithographs’
lithograph on paper
45 x 64 cm
1954/56
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‘Girl’
lithograph on paper
63.5 x 45.2 cm
1957
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‘Man’
lithograph on paper
54 x 39 cm
1956
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Masanari Murai graduated from university in 1928 and almost immediately left for France with the intention of further developing his skills as a landscape painter. In Paris, the impact of direct contact with abstract art was such that Murai began to simplify his landscapes, exploring his own approach to abstract painting. After returning to Japan in 1932, Murai became one of Japan’s pioneers in the area of abstract art; he was a leader in its promotion, exhibition and education. It was Murai’s dying wish that the bulk of his works be entrusted to the Setagaya Art Museum, although some donations were also made to The Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo and Kyoto. [Ext : Masanari Murai Memorial Museum of Art]

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Masanari Murai : More Works

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16
Jan
12

Nathan Oliveira : ‘Edgar Allan Poe porfolio’ (Lithographs)

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‘Edgar Allan Poe V’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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‘Edgar Allan Poe VII’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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‘Edgar Allan Poe I’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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‘Edgar Allan Poe III’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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‘Edgar Allan Poe II’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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‘Edgar Allan Poe VI’
Nathan Oliveira
Lithograph
1971
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Nathan Oliveira : Smithsonian Institution

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08
Oct
11

Toko Shinoda : Lithographs (Prints 2)

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“The most important element is my heart, that I try to express through my body and my hands. When I take a brush in my hand, my heart searches for lines, and tries to create forms.” Toko Shinoda

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‘Tamayura’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1996

‘Simile’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Rippling’
lithograph
15-3/4 x 11-1/4″
1983

‘Blessing’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/4″
1983

‘Snow’
lithograph
13-1/4 x 10-1/2″
1982

‘Fete’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1997

‘Maiden’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1985

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Toko zealously studied traditional calligraphy and “waka” poetry. She began teaching calligraphy, and had her first one-woman exhibition in Tokyo just before the war. During the war she tended toward abstract work, which she developed to international exhibition level over the next period. After two years’ residence in New York, in Tokyo again she turned to lithographs. She became the first female artist to collaborate with architects and with interior designers. Her versatility extended to producing textiles for theater curtains, ceramic reliefs in buildings, etchings in stainless steel for elevator decor.

[Extract : The Japan Times]

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Toko Shinoda : Castle Fine Arts

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04
Oct
11

Toko Shinoda : Lithographs (Prints)

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In an interview in the 1960s, artist Toko Shinoda said it was both wonderful and terrible to be driven by something inside. She quoted Japan’s woodblock print artist Hokusai. “I know what he meant when he said that at 75 he could understand a little. If he lived to be 90 he would understand more. And if he could live to be 120, then maybe he could understand.” Toko Shinoda

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‘Brief Note’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Snow’
lithograph
15-3/4″ x 11-1/4″
1983

‘An Ode’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1988

‘Rihaku’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Nocturne’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

‘Winter Green B’
lithograph
15 x 11″
1990

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Sometimes, in suggestions of the gentleness of her own nature, she used fragile wisps of brushes for her delicate work. Sometimes, acknowledging her certainty and inner strength, in both hands she wielded heavy mops of brushes made from special strands of sheep’s wool. Sometimes she used paper that was made by hand 300 years ago. She gave two sources for the force that drove her, “My family environment, and something in my own heart.” [Extract : The Japan Times]

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Toko Shinoda : Castle Fine Arts

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14
Jul
10

Georges Braque : Birds

“Reality only reveals itself when it is illuminated by a ray of poetry” Georges Braque

Georges Braque
October bird
1962
Lithograph

Georges Braque
If I died over there
Wood Engraving
1962

Georges Braque
Birds
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
Birds on Blue
Lithograph
1955

Georges Braque
The white bird
1961
Lithograph

Georges Braque
The Library is on fire
1956
Etching

Georges Braque
Night Flight
1957
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two birds on blue background
1960
Lithograph

Georges Braque
Two Birds
1958
Serigraph

Georges Braque
The Duck
1956
Oil and gouache on panel

Throughout his life, Braque produced numerous prints, mastering the techniques of etching, lithography, aqua-tint and woodcut. Unlike etching however, which relies more on the technique of drawing, lithography leans more toward painting allowing the artist to use color in his compositions. Braque’s lithographs however are not merely imitations of his paintings. In his early lithographs he reacted to the possibilities offered by the medium and achieved a texture that was foreign to his etchings and a transparency quite different from the density of his oil paintings.

In 1945, after a short hiatus, Braque returned to lithography and he continued to pursue this until the end of his life. This time his approach to the medium is different in that he no longer allows the grain but only the color to speak. He rejects the accurate capabilities of the line and instead deliberately thickens his strokes to give them a more painterly feel. The stroke is sufficiently thick so that even when black is used, it will have the impact of a color. This unusual quality of line should not be mistaken for mishandling or inexperience but rather a shift to a more painterly style and point of view.

Georges Braque Prints

Georges Braque Lithographs




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