Posts Tagged ‘large-format

11
Jul
12

Erwin Staeheli : “Gravel & Coal” Series (Photography)

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‘h422-11’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h422-08’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h422-07’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h412-03’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h409-11’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h409-07’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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‘h410-12’
gelatin silver print
60 x 60 cm
2003
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Erwin Staeheli studied art in Basel, Switzerland. After a period of painting he changed to photography. From 1980 to 1994 he worked as a civil engineer, planning and supervising roadwork, concrete constructions and water supply systems. Since 1995 he’s worked as an art photographer. He lives in Switzerland and four months out of the year in Australia where he digs for sapphires and also takes photographs. Physical work is essential for his artwork. That’s one of the reasons he prefers to use the medium and large format cameras and why he prints on fibre-based papers in his own laboratory. [bio]

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Erwin Staeheli : Website

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12
Feb
12

Eve Calingaert : Artworks (Calligraphy)

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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Eve Calingaert
Calligraphy
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Studied calligraphy with a Japanese master, for ten years,
who encouraged him to work the ground and in large format.

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Eve Calingaert : Galerie Faider

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12
Feb
12

Jeff Gaydash : Photography

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“I am drawn to the relationship between man and nature, and
humankind’s effects on the natural world around us.” Jeff Gaydash

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‘Architecture 1’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2010
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‘Refinery’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2010
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‘Flux’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2011
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‘Churning’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2010
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‘Pier: Study III’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2010
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‘Transmission Grid’
Jeff Gaydash
Photograph
2010
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My passion for B&W photography began years ago in a school darkroom. The first time I watched my print magically appear in the developer tray I was hooked. Captivated by the chemical process before me I felt an immediate sense of empowerment. I ended up majoring in photography in college and studied the work of master photographers Minor White, Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Weston, Paul Strand and Imogen Cunningham, among others. I gained an appreciation not only for the photographs they made but also for the craftsmanship of their prints. The image tonality, paper surface and archival properties were an object of art in themselves. My appreciation for the fine art print led me to start shooting with large format view cameras and contact printing on silver and platinum-based papers.

In the early to mid 1990’s, digital photographic imaging was still in its infancy and I embraced the new technologies with open arms. I was fascinated by the unbelievable control that was suddenly possible. A digital workflow consists of making the exposure (or exposures), post-processing using image editing software, then most often exporting the image to an online portfolio or website. While the internet has become an invaluable medium for sharing your work with others all over the world, sadly it seems that the fine art photographic print has lost its place as an integral part of the digital photographic process…

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Jeff Gaydash : Website

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23
Jan
12

Osheen Harruthoonyan: ‘Black Garden’ Series (Photography)

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“It’s easy to lose sight of exactly who you are while passing through the ‘Black Garden’. At the start, things are clear, there’s you and there’s the land, you each have your names and the division is simple.

Yet even from a peak within Nagorno-Karabakh you’re lost in the panorama. Mountain after mountain begets valley upon valley. A singular road runs through it all and though the end is too far to make out, you trust there’s an end. In your immediate vicinity at any given time you lose yourself in the intimacy of the trees, the overgrown foliage, the tombstones of an abandoned graveyard like fossilised crevices disintegrating in the wind. Voices buried beneath the moss, and cumulative silence, whisper about war.

There are small signs of life, a singular bird, a crucifix like a question mark that would cease to be seen if not for a blinking flame between the dripping walls of a crumbling cave. As night falls, shadows cannot be deciphered from leaves. Something floats by your eye, mouches volontes, a schism in the visual fabric, produced by your mind or the air, it does not matter. Your heart beats out what colour is left of the fading day and at once you are included and excluded from the landscape…” – Amy Pagnotta

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‘Black Garden’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Black Mirror’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Swan’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
28 x 35 inches
2011
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‘Wave’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Schism’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Tree of Garni’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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‘Mercury’
sepia, gold, selenium toned
gelatin silver print
25 x 25 inches
2011
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Born in Persia and raised in Athens, Greece and Vancouver B.C., Osheen Harruthoonyan is a Toronto based photographer and filmmaker. Drawing upon his rich experiences living in such diverse cities, he employs a multi-faceted approach towards his artistic practice, investigating memory, history and the deconstructive process of time. Osheen’s work has been featured on Bravo! Arts Channel and his exhibitions in Toronto have consistently been noted as a top show not to miss. Harruthoonyan has also worked as a cinematographer on numerous short films, music videos, and experimental films.

Osheen Harruthoonyan’s sumptuous photographic prints evoke the uncertain, fledgling flashes encountered at the threshold of a dream. Combining traditional large-format photography with a variety of analog photo-manipulation techniques, Harruthoonyan skillfully renders his subjects within ethereally illusive environments. The fastidious striations and cracks of his altered film negatives become esoteric anomalies that hearken to a unique and singular “subterranean realm”.

Harruthoonyan’s willingness to take risks within the confines of the traditional photographic process makes this representational capacity possible. Altering each negative by hand, his works crystallize midway between the calculable and the spontaneous, addressing both the systematic and the chaotic. His careful yet playful inventiveness unravels the mysteries of our collective irreconcilable reverie. Harruthoonyan’s creations conjure the lifetimes that exist within moments, and the glimmers of strangeness that give pause to our ever-evolving subconscious states. Within his work, we witness not only the captured image, but the very process of image-making laid bare. – [Ex : La Petite Mort Gallery]

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Osheen Harruthoonyan : Website

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06
Jan
12

William Eckersley : “Dark City” Series (Night Photography)

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Initially inspired by the stillness of London at night, photographer William Eckersley began experimenting in late 2007 and after four years of stunning large format photography, he’s published a book of these works called ‘Dark City’ which promise a compelling view of unseen London. –  view here

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‘Factory, Tree And Moon Behind Silhouette, RM9’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Spotlit Steps From Fire Exit, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Trolleys In Car Park, CR0’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Bridge Over Canal, E15’
(c-type print / 2009)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Bend In Pedestrian Tunnel, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Shopping Arcade, SE1’
(c-type print / 2008)
“Dark City” Series
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‘Lake And Four Housing Blocks, SE2’
(c-type print / 2010)
“Dark City” Series
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At night, a once flat world illuminated by dull, grey daylight is transformed under the cloak of darkness. Garish spotlighting casts deep shadows and silhouettes, with hues of pink, cyan and orange. The stage is devoid of its human players and seems to showcase the scenery’s forgotten beauty, revealing a stark and otherworldly aesthetic in a city drained of its occupants. The built environment, deliberately contrived to service the needs and desires of humanity, makes sense in the context of teeming human life – without this however, its inherent functionality no longer visible, our urban spaces appeared to stand forlorn, waiting to be judged on their genius or folly, beauty or ugliness… [Extract : Stucco Press]

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William Eckersley : Stucco Press

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14
Dec
11

Lynne Cohen : ‘Interior Spaces’ (Photography)

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Cohen is known for her photographs of domestic and institutional interior spaces, which have included living rooms, public halls, retirement homes, laboratories, offices, showrooms, shooting ranges, factories, spas, and military installations. Despite this interest in living and working spaces, Cohen’s photographs are usually devoid of human presence. She photographs using an 8 x 10″ view camera.

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‘SPA’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1993
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‘Untitled’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
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‘SPA’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1993
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‘Classroom, Police School’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1985
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‘Classroom, Flying School’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1980
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‘Military installation’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1994
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‘SPA’
Lynne Cohen
Photograph
1994
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Since the early 1970s, Cohen has lived and worked in no fewer than nine countries, photographing unpopulated interiors in public and private establishments such as schools, spas, and laboratories. Her practice has been informed by her nomadic lifestyle. Her mostly black-and-white images may seem to be documentations of specific awkward and cold, yet alluring, spaces. But are they? Cohen’s already complex imagery of the social fabric of contemporary cities is further complicated by her decision not to provide her viewers with information about where they were shot. Viewers are therefore faced with a panoply of found interiors that are as many testimonials to cultural and social environments situated throughout the Western world; none of them, however, can be attached to a specific culture.

The environments depicted warrant a questioning of the spaces that we inhabit. This interrogation shifts the discourse from one of tension between Self and Other to one of internal instability, which encourages a non-oppositional conception of cultural entities. The entirety of Cohen’s oeuvre consists of interior spaces, both private and public. They are shot with an 8 x 10 inch camera, which enables her to produce incredibly detailed and sharp images. The large format of her works and the unobstructed foreground seem to allow the viewers to step into the picture if they so desired. This is real space.

[Extract : (Un)framing Interior Views]

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Lynne Cohen : Website

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Ai : Series : Photography Book

aesthetic investig...
By Azurebumble

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